21 Oct 2019

feedTalkAndroid

Google says they’ll fix the security of the Pixel 4’s facial unlock in the next few months

Google brought a new form of facial recognition to the Pixel 4, allowing users to unlock their device with a scan of their face. That's generally a more secure way to handle device unlocking, at least compared to a fingerprint scanner, even if it's a little less convenient. But there's a catch; it was pretty […]


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21 Oct 2019 6:30pm GMT

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Google working on Pixel 4 face unlock issue “in the coming months”

One thing that will probably stop some people from buying the Pixel 4 right now is that the face unlock feature is not as secure as Google is touting it to be. It seems that even if you have your eyes closed, your face can still unlock the device. Google has already said they're working […]

21 Oct 2019 6:00pm GMT

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Choetech Wireless Car Charger Review: High speed, low price

Wireless charging is incredibly convenient, but it can be a little tougher to get it working in your car. And if you travel a lot, or you have a long commute to work, charging in your car might be a bigger deal than charging your phone overnight. There are tons of wireless car chargers in […]


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21 Oct 2019 5:23pm GMT

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Android Automotive OS updates for developers

Posted by Madan Ankapura, Product Manager, Android

Google's vision is to bring a safe and seamless connected experience to every car. Since 2017, we have announced collaborations with vehicle manufacturers like Volvo Car Group, General Motors and others to power infotainment systems with Android Automotive OS, Google's open-source Android platform, and to enable integration of Google technology and services. Now with the reveal of Volvo's XC40 Recharge and the previously announced Polestar 2, we are making progress on our vision with these brand new, customized infotainment systems that feature real-time updates to the Google Assistant, Google Maps and automotive apps created by Google, and the global developer community.

Volvo XC40 carVolvo XC40 infotainment unit

Volvo XC40 Recharge & its infotainment unit

With more manufacturers adding Android Automotive OS based infotainment systems to their vehicles, app developers have an opportunity to reach even more users with innovative, and drive optimized experiences.

Concept image from GM on Maps & Media integration

Concept image from GM on Maps & Media integration

Developing & testing media apps on emulator

At Google I/O 2019, we published design guidelines for developing media apps for cars, added wizard support to Android Studio, updated emulator to have car specific controls and the Android Automotive OS emulator system image. These latest features helped Android developers start to design, as well as develop and test their existing media apps to run on Android Automotive OS (review developer documentation here).

Today, we're announcing that developers can download an updated Android Automotive OS emulator system image that includes the Google Play Store. This means developers no longer have to wait to get their hands on a vehicle, but can design, develop, run apps right within the emulator, and can now test distribution via Play Console by requesting access.

In addition to the apps announced at Google I/O, more media app developers, including Amazon Music, Audioburst and YouTube Music, are adapting their apps for Android Automotive OS. The process of porting existing media apps that support Android Auto to this platform is simple and requires minimal development resources.

Audioburst, Amazon Music and YouTube Music running on the Android Automotive OS emulator

Audioburst, Amazon Music and YouTube Music running on the Android Automotive OS emulator

And if you want to learn more about creating apps for Android Automotive OS - join us at Android Dev Summit 2019. Come talk to us in our sandbox, tune in via livestream on YouTube, or post on the automotive-developers Google Group or Stack Overflow using android-automotive tags.

We hope to see you there!

21 Oct 2019 5:13pm GMT

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OPPO is gearing up to launch a Qualcomm-powered dual-mode 5G smartphone before the end of 2019

It was just last week that OPPO launched its new Reno 2 and Reno 2z handsets in the UK, and now the brand has revealed it is partnering up with Qualcomm to develop a dual-mode 5G handset. The partnership was announced during the recent Qualcomm 5G summit, with OPPO planning on launching the device before […]


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21 Oct 2019 5:06pm GMT

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Android 10 update now lets 3rd party launchers access gesture navigation

One of the new things that come with the Android 10 has been the gesture navigation system. While it has been pretty divisive among users and tech writers, one of the foremost criticism is that it did not work with third-party launchers like Nova, Action Launcher, etc. Google promised that they would fix this in […]

21 Oct 2019 4:30pm GMT

LG Stylo 5+ available on AT&T as an enhanced Stylo 5

The LG Stylo 5 was first made available on Cricket Wireless and then a few months later, it hit Metro and T-Mobile. The phone is getting a minor upgrade and follow up in the form of the LG Stylo 5+. This time, it's AT&T releasing the new Android smartphone that boasts a large 6.2-inch FHD+ […]

21 Oct 2019 3:00pm GMT

17 Oct 2019

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Introducing NDK r21: our first Long Term Support release

Posted by Dan Albert, Android NDK Tech Lead

Android NDK r21 is now in beta! It's been a longer than usual development cycle (four months since NDK r20), so there's quite a lot to discuss for this release.

We have the usual toolchain updates, improved defaults for better security and performance, and are making changes to our release process to better accommodate users that need stability without hindering those that want new features.

New Minimum System Requirements

This release comes with new minimum system requirements. Following Android Studio and the SDK, 32-bit Windows is no longer supported. While this change will not affect most developers, this change does have an impact if you use 32-bit versions of Microsoft® Windows®. Linux users must have glibc 2.17 or newer.

Release Cycle Changes and LTS

One release a year will be our Long Term Support (LTS) release for users that want stability more than they need new features. The release will undergo a longer beta cycle before being released, and will receive bug fixes as backports until next year's LTS release. Generally releasing in Q4, our first LTS release will be NDK r21.

The non-LTS releases each year, which we call the "rolling" release, will be similar to our current process. These will be approximately quarterly releases of our latest set of features, which will only be patched later for critical toolchain fixes. If you want the latest features from Clang and libc++, this is the release for you.

More detail, including the criteria we will use to determine what will be backported, what kinds of bugs will trigger a point release, and the bar we hold each release to can be found documented on our GitHub Wiki.

New Features and Updates

There are quite a lot of new things in this release, resolving bugs and helping you write better, safer code.

We've updated GNU Make to version 4.2, which enables --output-sync to avoid interleaving output with error messages. This is enabled by default with ndk-build. This also includes a number of bug fixes, including fixing the pesky CreateProcess errors on Windows.

GDB has been updated to version 8.3, which includes fixes for debugging modern Intel CPUs.

Updated LLVM

As always, we've updated LLVM and all of its components (Clang, lld, libc++, etc) which includes many improvements.

The toolchain has been updated to r365631 (the master branch as of 10 July 2019). This includes fixes for quite a few bugs in the previous release, perhaps most importantly LLD no longer hangs when using multithreaded linking on Windows. OpenMP is now available as a dynamic library (and this is the new default behavior, so link with -static-openmp if you want to stick with the static runtime).

A handful of driver improvements have been made to reduce the amount of compiler configuration required by each build system as well. Build system owners should check the updated Build System Maintainers guide.

libc++ has been updated to r369764.

Fortify

Fortify is now enabled by default when using ndk-build or the CMake toolchain file (this includes ExternalNativeBuild users). Fortify enables additional checks in the standard library that can help catch bugs sooner and mitigate security issues. For example, without fortify the following code compiles fine:

    const char src[] = "this string is too long";
    char dst[10];
    strcpy(dst, src);

With fortify, the buffer overflow is diagnosed at compile-time:

    test.cpp:10:18: error: 'strcpy' called with string bigger than buffer
      strcpy(dst, src);
                     ^

It is not always possible for the compiler to detect this issue at compile-time. In those cases, a run-time check will be used instead that will cause the program to abort rather than continue unsafely.

If you're using a build system other than ndk-build or CMake via the NDK's toolchain file, this will not be enabled by default. To enable, simply define _FORTIFY_SOURCE=2. The most reliable way to do this is by adding -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2 to your compiler flags.

Clang can also statically detect some of these issues by using -Wfortify-source (also new in r21). This is on by default, but it's recommended to enforce fixing issues with -Werror=fortify-source. Use this in addition to the C library features, not instead of, since the warnings do not cover the same cases as the C library extension, nor can it add run-time checks.

Note that because run-time support is required for fortify and the feature was gradually added to Android over time, the exact set of APIs protected by fortify depends on your minSdkVersion. Fortify is an improvement, but it is not a replacement for good tests, ASan, and writing safe code.

See FORTIFY in Android for an in-depth explanation of fortify.

Other updates

64-bit requirement

Since August 2019, all existing and new apps are now required to support 64-bit before they can be released to Google Play; there's an extension for a limited set of apps. For more information and help on adding support for 64-bit, see our guide.

Neon by default

Arm code is now built with Neon by default. In a previous release we enabled it conditionally based on minSdkVersion, but given the very small number of devices that don't support Neon we now enable it unconditionally. This offers improved performance on all 32-bit Arm devices (64-bit Arm always had this, and it does not affect Intel ABIs).

As before, this behavior can be disabled for apps that need to continue supporting devices without Neon. Alternatively, those devices can be blacklisted in the Play Console. See https://developer.android.com/ndk/guides/cpu-arm-neon for more information.

Up Next

Have a look at our roadmap to see what we're working on next. The next few big things coming up are package management and better CMake integration.

17 Oct 2019 5:25pm GMT

09 Oct 2019

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Previewing #AndroidDevSummit: Sessions, App, & Livestream Details

Posted by The #AndroidDevSummit team

In two weeks, we'll be welcoming Android developers from around the world at Android Dev Summit 2019, broadcasting live from the Google Events Center (MP7) in Sunnyvale, CA on October 23 & 24. Whether you're joining us in person or via the livestream, we've got a great show planned for you; starting today, you can read more details about the keynote, sessions, codelabs, sandbox, the mobile app, and how online viewers can participate.

The keynote, sessions, sandbox and more, kicking off at 10AM PDT

The summit kicks off on October 23 at 10 a.m. PDT with a keynote, where you'll hear from Dave Burke, VP Engineering for Android, and others on the present and future of Android development. From there, we'll dive into two days of deep technical content from the Android engineering team, on topics such as Android platform, Android Studio, Android Jetpack, Kotlin, Google Play, and more.

The full agenda is now available, so you can start to plan your summit experience. We'll also have demos in the sandbox, hands-on learning with codelabs, plus exclusive content for those watching on the livestream.

Get the Android Dev Summit app on Google Play!

The official app for Android Dev Summit 2019 has started rolling out on Google Play. With the app, you can explore the agenda by searching through topics and speakers. Plan your summit experience by saving events to your personalized schedule. You'll be able to watch the livestream and find recordings after sessions occur, and more. (By the way, the app is also an Instant app, so with one tap you can try it out first before installing!)

2019 #AndroidDevSummit app


A front-row seat from your desk, and #AskAndroid your pressing questions!

We'll be broadcasting live on YouTube and Twitter starting October 23 at 10 a.m. PDT. In addition to a front row seat to over 25 Android sessions, there will be exclusive online-only content and an opportunity to have your most pressing Android development questions answered live, broadcast right from the event.

Tweet us your best questions using the hashtag #AskAndroid in the lead-up to the Android Dev Summit. We've gathered experts from Jetpack to Kotlin to Android 10, so we've got you covered. We'll be answering your questions live between sessions on the livestream. Plus, we will share updates directly from the Google Events Center to our social channels, so be sure to follow along!

09 Oct 2019 10:45pm GMT