11 Nov 2011

feedCI News

Reportula

What can you tell us about the team that built reportula.org?

The Team that made reportula.org is just one person. Pedro Oliveira, started Reportula when he needed a clean and fast web application that reported the Bacula Backups software of the company he works for. He has decided to open the project, and let it grow to full web application that is able to manage the Bacula Backups.

Reportula Website Screen Shot

What can you tell us about the site in general? What are the goals of the site and the main audience?

Reportula is a php based web program that provides you a summarized output of jobs that have already run. It obtains its information from the Bacula's database. Aside from a nice graphical display, it provides summaries of your jobs, as well as graphs of job usage. This is a fairly high level bacula management tool.

The main goals were to create a web reporting tool for the bacula backups system, as I got further into the project it developed into something more than that. Right know it calculates average of bacula backups, it has time line history of backups. Imagine this scenario for example, if you use the crontab feature of reportula, you can see in time by how much data your backups infrastructure is growing.

Example. in 2011.05.01 if backups infrastructure stores 500 Tera bytes, in 2011.12.30 it stores 510 terabytes. This is very handy for us because with this feature you can predict the storage needs of your backups for the future.

What was your major consideration in using CodeIgniter for this?

I chose codeigniter because I needed an easy, fast, and supported PHP development framework. I found that with Codeigniter I could achieve that. This project was made in less than month.

Another nice thing about Codeigniter is that you don't have to "re-invent the wheel". Codeigniter has most of the thing that you need for an application already developed. All you have to do is connect the blocks which is very easy.

What is next on the plate for reportula.org? Any additional functionality you can tell us about?

On the plate for Reportula is user registrations, acls, and managing Bacula Backups like "bconsole".

Do you have any other information you'd like to share with the community? Tips from this project you'd like to share? Lessons you've learned?

First of all i think that Codeigniter is one of the best frameworks on the internet. I've tried them all (Cake, Yii, Symfony, Zend) they are all too complicated, too big, with lots of features and slow. They all had one problem BIG, STEEP LEARNING CURVE.

Codeigniter has less features than the others but you start making an application in less than 30 minutes. And what it does it does well! Even if you think you need a big framework after starting with codeigniter it cames to you that you don't need another framework to develop some applications. The lessons I learned are don't re-invent the wheel, Codeigniter does it and does it well, the community are nice, and always had support on the forum.

11 Nov 2011 10:19pm GMT

02 Nov 2011

feedCI News

GoCart

Every week we hear of really awesome places that CodeIgniter is being used. I want to start sharing those with the community-at-large. I will start by posting them here under a new Showcase Category with the hopes that any future revisions of CI.com will have a section for stuff like this. You guys and gals make some really cool stuff and deserve a platform to show it off.

So without further ado…

This showcase is an interview with Kyle Roseborrough about GoCart

What can you tell us about the GoCart team?

We have a pair of PHP developers who knew there was a better way to build a shipping cart. Noah (lead developer) has 6 years experience in PHP development and 4 years in CodeIgniter. Gabe has about 10 years experience in web application development. Kyle has been working in UI and management for 10 years.
GoCart Website Screen Shot

What can we tell about the site in general?

GoCartdv.com was built to showcase GoCart and offer some basic information on the system.

What are the goals of the site and the main audience?

The main audience is CodeIgniter developers who are wanting a simple, scalable, CodeIgniter shopping cart. The goal is to get people involved in development to improve the cart and allow it to fully embody the goal of the project. To be easy to customize for developers and easy to use for end users/customers

What was your major consideration in using CodeIgniter for this?

CodeIgniter has great documentation and is easy to learn. We build lot of custom projects on CodeIgniter and it only made sense for us to build our cart on it. When looking for commerce solutions, we never found a suitable solution built on CodeIgniter so we decided to set out to do it on our own.

What is next on the plate for GoCart?

We really want GoCart to foster a great community of people contributing back to the roadmap and path the project will take. We want the focus to remain the same though "Easy to Customize, Easy to Use". It would be great if we could get enough people using.

Any additional functionality you can tell us about?

Well, not really. GoCart is intended to be a shopping cart, plain and simple. It does have some basic page and banner management and a whole slew of cart related features, but ultimately it's an ecommerce platform.

Do you have any other information you'd like to share with the community?

We built GoCart to be simple and scalable. As time goes on, we want the software to become easier and easier to use. We want GoCart to be scalable and to be able to work with new platforms as they come out. We feel that CodeIgniter and the CodeIgniter community is a huge benefit here. It enables developers to tie into a whole plethora of libraries, helpers and applications easily and support each other in the endeavor to make CodeIgniter better. Essentially, what's good for CodeIgniter is good for GoCart.

Tips from this project you'd like to share?

If you really want something, do it yourself. If it doesn't happen then you probably don't want it as bad as you think.

Lessons you've learned?

- Not every idea is a good one. Generally you need someone else around to discuss ideas and methods with. Collaboration is the best way to build a good application.
- No one knows what the next trend will be. Having a scalable platform that will adjust to a new set of tools and user demands is very important.


If you have a project that you would like to see in our showcase email me

02 Nov 2011 7:31pm GMT

05 Oct 2011

feedCI News

New User Guide in Development

We are happy to announce today that the user guide has had some significant improvements, and the first commit of these changes were just pushed today.

As many of you likely heard at CICON 2011, the Reactor team has had an internal project going on for some time to move the user guide to Sphinx. In addition to handling the tedium of generating page and document tables of contents, or maintaining internal links and references, the documentation is now easier to write, as you can simply focus on the content instead of markup and presentation. Don't forget syntax highlighting of PHP, HTML, CSS, and JavaScript in code samples. Based on ReStructured Text, it's also more human readable in a text editor than HTML is, which is likely where you spend most of your time. As an added benefit, Sphinx can output HTML, PDF, and even EPUB formats all from the same source files. We will likely be taking advantage of that at a later date.

But we didn't stop there, we also enlisted the thunderous powers of EllisLab's Chief Creative Officer, James Mathias for a style redesign. They are clean, easy to read, and beautiful.

Setting up your dev environment to work with Sphinx (if you want to render and output locally) is very easy, and takes about five minutes. For those that want to geek out, we have added a readme file to the user guide source folder so the step by step instructions are available right from GitHub.

Today marks the first commit with the new user guide to the unreleased develop branch, so you may encounter some bumps. Most notably are the code blocks, which pandoc lost our line breaks on, and some navigation issues as we experiment with different table of contents presentation and depth. We'll be cleaning these up prior to the next release (much is as simple as some line breaks and tabs), but feel free to pitch in and submit some pull requests if you see anything out of whack.

And lastly, for the first time ever, we have live nightly builds of documentation for the develop branch available at the CodeIgniter web site. Enjoy!

05 Oct 2011 7:23pm GMT