22 Jul 2018

feedSimply Recipes

How to Do a New England Clambake at Home

When I was growing up in New Jersey, my dad enlisted us kids to dig up clams down at the shore. It was usually a multi-family affair. The grownups built a fire on the beach and filled a new aluminum garbage can with seawater. They set the can over the fire, and once the water was at a boil, the clams went in.

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22 Jul 2018 2:00pm GMT

21 Jul 2018

feedSimply Recipes

Lemon Icebox Pie

Pie IS nostalgia. And this particular Lemon Icebox Pie represents my own personal stroll down memory lane, complete with sighs and happy feelings.

There's just something about a creamy, dense lemon filling topped with sour cream, settled on top of a graham cracker crust. It's one of those old-fashioned desserts that takes you back in time. It makes your cheeks pucker and your eyes roll with pleasure.

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21 Jul 2018 2:05pm GMT

Graham Cracker Crust

Do you love pie, but stress about the crust? Welcome to a very large club.

Never fear. Homemade pies aren't just for those people who were born with the domestic gene. After making this graham cracker crust, you will be able to start your very own new club called "Look, Ma, I Made a Pie!"

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21 Jul 2018 2:02pm GMT

19 Jul 2018

feedCooking with Amy: A Food Blog

Indo Fijian Food

I'm fascinated by the Pacific Islands, maybe it's because the San Francisco Bay Area is home to one of the largest populations of Pacific Islanders outside of the Pacific Islands. While I've spent a fair amount of time in Hawaii most of the other islands in the region are on my bucket list including Fiji. I was lucky enough to meet some Fijians recently and here is what I learned.

1. Fijians put family ahead of everthing else and are known for being very talented health care workers who say "caregiving is in our blood."

2. Fijians are passionate about rugby and were the world champtions in the Rugby World Cup Sevens twice and won the gold medal at the 2016 Summer Olympics.

3. Fijians partake in drinking kava made from the root of the Piper methysticum plant. It's has sedative, anesthetic and euphoric properties and relieves anxiety. Originally used in ceremonites, it's now enjoyed socially and served out of a bowl, if you're lucky by a charming and handsome Fijian.

4. Fiji was formerly a British colony, over 40% of their population is Indo Fijian. So much of their cuisine is influenced by Indian food.

5. Just as the Hawaiian word aloha means many things and is used as a greeting, Fijians use the word bula (boo-lah) which means life but implies good health.

In addition to meeting Fijians, I got to try some Indo-Fijian food. Here are a few dishes made by James Raven Chand, proprietor of Curryous? Catering. The food was outstanding and if you're looking for something a little out of the ordinary, James is your man.


First off, crunchy fried cassava served with pineapple cilantro chutney. In the middle are some of the tastiest meatballs, made from a combination of beef for flavor and chicken for tenderness, marinated in a spice paste and coated with a red pepper coconut glaze. Finally on the right, some classic samosas, filled with potatoes and peas. Light and crisp and delicious served with a tamarind chutney.

Last but not least, the Fijians are in San Francisco for their beloved rugby so if you'd like to meet them, head to the Rugby World Cup Sevens Welcome Ceremony at Embarcadero Plaza at 5 pm on Thursday July 19, 2018 or get tickets to see them play at AT&T Park. Or learn more about visiting Fiji.
©2018 Cooking with Amy. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

19 Jul 2018 2:37am GMT

18 Jul 2018

feedCooking with Amy: A Food Blog

Asian Night Markets coming to San Francisco

The San Francisco Bay Area has an incredibly diverse food scene. You can dine at Michelin star restaurants with elaborate tasting menus, or grab something on the go at a food truck and there's no shortage of options in between. Over the past 10 years street food events have provided a new option. But we've been missing something that's common in Asia, the night market. There have been a few pop-ups, but Off the Grid at Fort Mason is perhaps the closest thing we have to it on a regular basis. With music, drinks and almost 30 food vendors it's a fun and tasty way to spend a Friday night.

But if you've been to a night market in Asia, you know it offers much more than just food and music. It usually includes different kinds of entertainment, vendors and artisans selling their wares and sometimes even activities for kids. Night markets are fun but also a way to discover and connect with different people and cultures in a most delicious way. I'm happy to share two different night market events in San Francisco - one more geared towards adults and the other is all ages.


July 19th, 2018 from 7 - 10 pm
Chef's Hawker Centre Festival

Local chef Tu David Phu is the organizer of Chef's Hawker Centre style pop-ups including a ticketed event taking place at the Asian Art Museum this week. Guests will get unlimited access to food booths and two drink tickets to try cocktails by Kevin Diedrich of Pacific Cocktail Haven and Jack Daniels Cocktail Champ Adam Brogan.

Participating chefs include newly minted SF Chronicle Rising Star Chef Francis Ang of Pinoy Heritage, Jason Angeles of FK Frozen Custard, Reem Assil of Reem's California, Richgail Enriquez of Astig Vegan, Deuki Hong of Sunday at the Museum, Jake Rosenbush of Hardwood Bar & Smokery, Hanif Sadr of Komaaj, and Nite Yun of Nyum Bai.

I'm really excited about this event! I can vouch for the food from Francis Ang, Jason Angeles, Reem Assil, and Jake Rosenbush and am eager to try the rest. It's a great opportunity to explore some of the Bay Area's most exciting food all under one roof. Tickets start at $65


July 21st, 2018 (August 18th, September 15th, October 20th) from 4 -10 pm
Undiscovered SF Creative Night Market

Despite its fairly low profile, food writers like me have been saying Filipino food is the next big thing for ages and maybe it finally is coming true. This Summer and into the Fall there will be a Filipino night market taking place one Saturday a month, behind the SF Chronicle building at 401 Minna St. I recently went to a preview and loved every bite.

The line up of talent is amazing-lots of terrific chefs including Alex Retodo of The Lumpia Company who makes unbelievable fillings for his lumpia like bacon cheeseburger! Deanna Sison Foster of Mestiza, Chef JP of The Sarap Shop who makes complex and flavorful Laing rice bowls with succulent braised taro leaves with ginger and shrimp paste, Hannah Huyoa of Adobos and More who could find no Filipino food in Santa Rosa and began making her own scrumptious adobo tacos, Dennis Villafranca aka Jeepney Guy who makes crispy skin pork lechon, and Reina Montenegro of Nick's Kitchen who will blow you away with her vegan versions of everything from flan to sisig and caldereta, her food is really unbelievable. I'm leaving out the desserts (there's got to be some surprises).
©2018 Cooking with Amy. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

18 Jul 2018 1:08am GMT

14 Jun 2018

feedCooking with Amy: A Food Blog

Roasted Fioretto Recipe

It's not often that you come across a new vegetable. The first time I saw Fioretto at a market in Chinatown I thought it must be some kind of weird overgrown cauliflower. It turns out it's a relatively new hybrid that combines the best of broccoli and cauliflower. In addition to Fioretto, it's also called stick cauliflower, flowering cauliflower, Chinese cauliflower and kaurifurore. It has thinner sweeter tops than cauliflower, and stems similar to broccoli which are sometimes white and other times pale green. The stems deepen in color when cooked.

The hybrid was developed in Japan in 2012 by a seed company and I started noticing it the past year or so but couldn't find much information about it. Once I tried cooking it, I became a fan. Because it's less dense, it's easy to cook and lends itself well to raw, steamed or stir fried recipes. One of the ways I particularly like preparing it is by roasting it with olive oil, salt and garlic. Like traditional cauliflower it develops a very appealing sweet flavor when cooked. It's a great side dish, but also good tossed with pasta or in a roasted vegetable salad served either warm or at room temperature.

I've seen Fioretto at both farmer's markets and frequently in Asian produce markets and it's also distributed by Melissa's and Specialty Produce. Like other brassicas it's high in vitamin C, dietary fiber and potassium. If you've tried it, let me know in the comments.

Roasted Fioretto
Serves 4

Ingredients

1 head of Fioretto broken into small pieces, about 4 cups when sliced
2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
Pinch of kosher salt

Instructions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Break the vegetable into bite sized florets and toss in a bowl with olive oil, garlic and salt. Place on a foil lined rimmed baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes or until tender and brown in spots.


Enjoy!
©2018 Cooking with Amy. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

14 Jun 2018 3:09pm GMT