18 Sep 2018

feedPlanet Debian

Daniel Pocock: What is the relationship between FSF and FSFE?

Ever since I started blogging about my role in FSFE as Fellowship representative, I've been receiving communications and queries from various people, both in public and in private, about the relationship between FSF and FSFE. I've written this post to try and document my own experiences of the issue, maybe some people will find this helpful. These comments have also been shared on the LibrePlanet mailing list for discussion (subscribe here)

Being the elected Fellowship representative means I am both a member of FSFE e.V. and also possess a mandate to look out for the interests of the community of volunteers and donors (they are not members of FSFE e.V). In both capacities, I feel uncomfortable about the current situation due to the confusion it creates in the community and the risk that volunteers or donors may be confused.

The FSF has a well known name associated with a distinctive philosophy. Whether people agree with that philosophy or not, they usually know what FSF believes in. That is the power of a brand.

When people see the name FSFE, they often believe it is a subsidiary or group working within the FSF. The way that brands work, people associate the philosophy with the name, just as somebody buying a Ferrari in Berlin expects it to do the same things that a Ferrari does in Boston.

To give an example, when I refer to "our president" in any conversation, people not knowledgeable about the politics believe I am referring to RMS. More specifically, if I say to somebody "would you like me to see if our president can speak at your event?", some people think it is a reference to RMS. In fact, FSFE was set up as a completely independent organization with distinct membership and management and therefore a different president. When I try to explain this to people, they sometimes lose interest and the conversation can go cold very quickly.

FSFE leadership have sometimes diverged from FSF philosophy, for example, it is not hard to find some quotes about "open source" and one fellow recently expressed concern that some people behave like "FSF Light". But given that FSF's crown jewels are the philosophy, how can an "FSF Light" mean anything? What would "Ferrari Light" look like, a red lawnmower? Would it be a fair use of the name Ferrari?

Some concerned fellows have recently gone as far as accusing the FSFE staff of effectively domain squatting or trolling the FSF (I can't link to that because of FSFE's censorship regime). When questions appear about the relationship in public, there is sometimes a violent response with no firm details. (I can't link to that either because of FSFE's censorship regime)

The FSFE constitution calls on FSFE to "join forces" with the FSF and sometimes this appears to happen but I feel this could be taken further.

FSF people have also produced vast amounts of code (the GNU Project) and some donors appear to be contributing funds to FSFE in gratitude for that or in the belief they are supporting that. However, it is not clear to me that funds given to FSFE support that work. As Fellowship representative, a big part of my role is to think about the best interests of those donors and so the possibility that they are being confused concerns me.

Given the vast amounts of money and goodwill contributed by the community to FSFE e.V., including a recent bequest of EUR 150,000 and the direct questions about this issue I feel it is becoming more important for both organizations to clarify the issue.

FSFE has a transparency page on the web site and this would be a good place to publish all documents about their relationship with FSF. For example, FSFE could publish the documents explaining their authorization to use a name derived from FSF and the extent to which they are committed to adhere to FSF's core philosophy and remain true to that in the long term. FSF could also publish some guidelines about the characteristics of a sister organization, especially when that organization is authorized to share the FSF's name.

In the specific case of sister organizations who benefit from the tremendous privilege of using the FSF's name, could it also remove ambiguity if FSF mandated the titles used by officers of sister organizations? For example, the "FSFE President" would be referred to as "FSFE European President", or maybe the word president could be avoided in all sister organizations.

People also raise the question of whether FSFE can speak for all Europeans given that it only has a large presence in Germany and other organizations are bigger in other European countries. Would it be fair for some of those other groups to aspire to sister organization status and name-sharing rights too? Could dozens of smaller FSF sister organizations dilute the impact of one or two who go off-script?

Even if FSFE was to distance itself from FSF or even start using a new name and philosophy, as a member, representative and also volunteer I would feel uncomfortable with that as there is a legacy of donations and volunteering that have brought FSFE to the position the organization is in today.

That said, I would like to emphasize that I regard RMS and the FSF, as the original FSF, as having the final authority over the use of the name and I fully respect FSF's right to act unilaterally, negotiate with sister organizations or simply leave things as they are.

If you have questions or concerns about this topic, I would invite you to raise them on the LibrePlanet-discuss mailing list or feel free to email me directly.

18 Sep 2018 11:21pm GMT

Jonathan McDowell: Using ARP via netlink to detect presence

If you remember my first post about home automation I mentioned a desire to use some sort of presence detection as part of deciding when to turn the heat on. Home Assistant has a wide selection of presence detection modules available, but the easy ones didn't seem like the right solutions. I don't want something that has to run on my phone to say where I am, but using the phone as the proxy for presence seemed reasonable. It connects to the wifi when at home, so watching for that involves no overhead on the phone and should be reliable (as long as I haven't let my phone run down). I run OpenWRT on my main house router and there are a number of solutions which work by scraping the web interface. openwrt_hass_devicetracker is a bit better but it watches the hostapd logs and my wifi is actually handled by some UniFis.

So how to do it more efficiently? Learn how to watch for ARP requests via Netlink! That way I could have something sitting idle and only doing any work when it sees a new event, that could be small enough to run directly on the router. I could then tie it together with the Mosquitto client libraries and announce presence via MQTT, tying it into Home Assistant with the MQTT Device Tracker.

I'm going to go into a bit more detail about the Netlink side of things, because I found it hard to find simple documentation and ended up reading kernel source code to figure out what I wanted. If you're not interested in that you can find my mqtt-arp (I suck at naming simple things) tool locally or on GitHub. It ends up as an 8k binary for my MIPS based OpenWRT box and just needs fed a list of MAC addresses to watch for and details of the MQTT server. When it sees a device it cares about make an ARP request it reports the presence for that device as "home" (configurable), rate limiting it to at most once every 2 minutes. Once it hasn't seen anything from the device for 10 minutes it declares the location to be unknown. I have found Samsung phones are a little prone to disconnecting from the wifi when not in use so you might need to lengthen the timeout if all you have are Samsung devices.

Home Assistant configuration is easy:

device_tracker:
  - platform: mqtt
    devices:
      noodles: 'location/by-mac/0C:11:22:33:44:55'
      helen: 'location/by-mac/4C:11:22:33:44:55'

On to the Netlink stuff…

Firstly, you can watch the netlink messages we're interested in using iproute2 - just run ip monitor. Works as an unpriviledged user which is nice. This happens via an AF_NETLINK routing socket (rtnetlink(7)):

int sock;
sock = socket(AF_NETLINK, SOCK_RAW, NETLINK_ROUTE);

We then want to indicate we're listening for neighbour events:

struct sockaddr_nl group_addr;
bzero(&group_addr, sizeof(group_addr));
group_addr.nl_family = AF_NETLINK;
group_addr.nl_pid = getpid();
group_addr.nl_groups = RTMGRP_NEIGH;
bind(sock, (struct sockaddr *) &group_addr, sizeof(group_addr));

At this point we're good to go and can wait for an event message:

received = recv(sock, buf, sizeof(buf), 0);

This will be a struct nlmsghdr message and the nlmsg_type field will provide details of what type. In particular I look for RTM_NEWNEIGH, indicating a new neighbour has been seen. This is of type struct ndmsg and immediately follows the struct nlmsghdr in the received message. That has details of the address family type (IPv6 vs IPv4), the state and various flags (such as whether it's NUD_REACHABLE indicating presence). The only slightly tricky bit comes in working out the MAC address, which is one of potentially several struct nlattr attributes which follow the struct ndmsg. In particular I'm interested in an nla_type of NDA_LLADDR, in which case the attribute data is the MAC address. The main_loop function in mqtt-arp.c shows this - it's fairly simple stuff, and works nicely. It was just figuring out the relationship between it all and the exact messages I cared about that took me a little time to track down.

18 Sep 2018 7:18pm GMT

Joey Hess: censored Amazon review of Sandisk Ultra 32GB Micro SDHC Card

★ counterfeits in amazon pipeline

The 32 gb card I bought here at Amazon turned out to be fake. Within days I was getting read errors, even though the card was still mostly empty.

The logo is noticably blurry compared with a 32 gb card purchased elsewhere. Also, the color of the grey half of the card is subtly wrong, and the lettering is subtly wrong.

Amazon apparently has counterfiet stock in their pipeline, google "amazon counterfiet" for more.

You will not find this review on Sandisk Ultra 32GB Micro SDHC UHS-I Card with Adapter - 98MB/s U1 A1 - SDSQUAR-032G-GN6MA because it was rejected. As far as I can tell my review violates none of Amazon's posted guidelines. But it's specific about how to tell this card is counterfeit, and it mentions a real and ongoing issue that Amazon clearly wants to cover up.

18 Sep 2018 6:03pm GMT