24 Jun 2018

feedPlanet KDE

This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24

After a light week, we're now roaring back with a veritable avalanche of Usability and Productivity! Look at all this cool stuff:

New Features

Bugfixes

UI Polish & Improvement

See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn't all that tough, and there's lots of support available. Give it a try today! It's easy and fun and important.

If my efforts to perform, guide, and document this work seem useful and you'd like to see more of them, then consider becoming a patron on Patreon, LiberaPay, or PayPal. Also consider making a donation to the KDE e.V. foundation.

24 Jun 2018 4:44am GMT

23 Jun 2018

feedPlanet GNOME

Matthias Clasen: A GTK+ 3 update

Plans

When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we've stuck to this for a while.

I has served us reasonably well - GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.

Reality

But, GTK+ 4 is taking its time to mature (more on that in another post), and some nice new features (such as font variation support, or Emoji completion) languish unused in master. We also get requests for critical APIs from some of the ported applications.

Therefore, we have decided that it is better to change course and allow a limited amount of new features and API in GTK+ 3.x, by doing a GTK+ 3.24 release in September.

There is now a gtk-3-24 branch in git. GTK+ 3.x maintenance has moved to that branch, and we won't be doing any further 3.22.x releases.

Highlights

The first release off this new branch is GTK+ 3.23.0, which can be found here:

https://download.gnome.org/sources/gtk+/3.23/gtk+-3.23.0.tar.xz

The highlights of this release include new font chooser features,

new Emoji features,

gdk_window_move_to_rect as public API,

and the Wayland backend using anonymous shared memory on FreeBSD.

Numerology

A side-effect of doing one more 3.x cycle is that we will have GTK+ 3.24 to be the final GTK+ 3, which is a pleasant parallel to GTK+ 2.24 being the final GTK+ 2.

23 Jun 2018 11:36pm GMT

feedPlanet KDE

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages.

( Read more... )

Donate using Liberapay



comment count unavailable comments

23 Jun 2018 7:53pm GMT

Latte Dock, Beta 1 for v0.8 (v0.7.95)


Hello everyone Latte Dock v0.7.95 which is the first beta of v0.8 is here. Latte v0.8 is a huge release and one of its main goals is to make the user feel with it very natural and comfortable.


Plasma 5.12 with Latte v0.7.95 *

"A powerful and intuitive panel/dock manager that provides an elegant Plasma experience"


To use it you should build it yourself from download.kde.org or ask your distro packagers to provide it for you.

Summer came in south Europe and Latte is moving forward. The first beta of an extreme major release is here. Latte has been updated a lot both for internals and user-side. Feel free to join evolution in dock and panel management and report back any issues.

Important for contributors: Beta1 will last 10 days, during these days translators will be able to report string improvements at bugs.kde.org. English isnt my native language, (proof reading / simpler expanations) might be necessary. When Beta2 is released around 3 to 5 July the string freeze will take place. Beta2 period will last 10 more days. So v0.8 is scheduled for 13 to 15 Jully. During all these days improvements and fixes can be landed through review process at kde phabricator.

Dont hesitate, just take part and participate if you feel so. I am the single developer of Latte for a few months now and fully open to discuss new implementations, code improvements and new features.


new layouts editor with locked and borderless layouts

No more talking, what v0.8 brings and why is it so important?


Videos for new features


New Features from v0.7.79 to Beta1
  • Filter Windows by Launchers, show only windows that there is already a launcher present for the current running activity
  • Improve Separators behavior
  • Lock/Unlock Layouts, different layouts can become read-only and writeable
  • Ungroup tasks of the same application
  • Borderless maximized windows per layout, the user can use that setting in order to replicate a Unity-style layout and a Plasma one at the same time.

Landed Features in v0.8

---------
* Wallpaper: https://www.webolution.gr/wp-content/uploads/october-2560x1600.jpg

* Archive has been signed with gpg key: 325E 97C3 2E60 1F5D 4EAD CF3A 5599 9050 A2D9 110E

23 Jun 2018 7:09am GMT

22 Jun 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Bastien Nocera: Thomson 8-bit computers, a history

In March 1986, my dad was in the market for a Thomson TO7/70. I have the circled classified ads in "Téo" issue 1 to prove that :)



TO7/70 with its chiclet keyboard and optical pen, courtesy of MO5.com


The "Plan Informatique pour Tous" was in full swing, and Thomson were supplying schools with micro-computers. My dad, as a primary school teacher, needed to know how to operate those computers, and eventually teach them to kids.

The first thing he showed us when he got the computer, on the living room TV, was a game called "Panic" or "Panique" where you controlled a missile, protecting a town from flying saucers that flew across the screen from either side, faster and faster as the game went on. I still haven't been able to locate this game again.

A couple of years later, the TO7/70 was replaced by a TO9, with a floppy disk, and my dad used that computer to write an educational software about top-down additions, as part of a training program run by the teachers schools ("Écoles Normales" renamed to "IUFM" in 1990).

After months of nagging, and some spring cleaning, he found the listings of his educational software, which I've liberated, with his permission. I'm currently still working out how to generate floppy disks that are usable directly in emulators. But here's an early screenshot.


Later on, my dad got an IBM PC compatible, an Olivetti PC/1, on which I'd play a clone of Asteroids for hours, but that's another story. The TO9 got passed down to me, and after spending a full summer doing planning for my hot-dog and chips van business (I was 10 or 11, and I had weird hobbies already), and entering every game from the "102 Programmes pour..." series of books, the TO9 got put to the side at Christmas, replaced by a Sega Master System, using that same handy SCART connector on the Thomson monitor.

But how does this concern you. Well, I've worked with RetroManCave on a Minitel episode not too long ago, and he agreed to do a history of the Thomson micro-computers. I did a fair bit of the research and fact-checking, as well as some needed repairs to the (prototype!) hardware I managed to find for the occasion. The result is this first look at the history of Thomson.



Finally, if you fancy diving into the Thomson computers, there will be an episode coming shortly about the MO5E hardware, and some games worth running on it, on the same YouTube channel.

I'm currently working on bringing the "Teo" TO8D emulator to Flathub, for Linux users. When that's ready, grab some games from the DCMOTO archival site, and have some fun!

I'll also be posting some nitty gritty details about Thomson repairs on my Micro Repairs Twitter feed for the more technically enclined among you.

22 Jun 2018 3:06pm GMT

feedPlanet GNOME

Bastien Nocera: Thomson 8-bit computers, a history

In March 1986, my dad was in the market for a Thomson TO7/70. I have the circled classified ads in "Téo" issue 1 to prove that :)



TO7/70 with its chiclet keyboard and optical pen, courtesy of MO5.com


The "Plan Informatique pour Tous" was in full swing, and Thomson were supplying schools with micro-computers. My dad, as a primary school teacher, needed to know how to operate those computers, and eventually teach them to kids.

The first thing he showed us when he got the computer, on the living room TV, was a game called "Panic" or "Panique" where you controlled a missile, protecting a town from flying saucers that flew across the screen from either side, faster and faster as the game went on. I still haven't been able to locate this game again.

A couple of years later, the TO7/70 was replaced by a TO9, with a floppy disk, and my dad used that computer to write an educational software about top-down additions, as part of a training program run by the teachers schools ("Écoles Normales" renamed to "IUFM" in 1990).

After months of nagging, and some spring cleaning, he found the listings of his educational software, which I've liberated, with his permission. I'm currently still working out how to generate floppy disks that are usable directly in emulators. But here's an early screenshot.


Later on, my dad got an IBM PC compatible, an Olivetti PC/1, on which I'd play a clone of Asteroids for hours, but that's another story. The TO9 got passed down to me, and after spending a full summer doing planning for my hot-dog and chips van business (I was 10 or 11, and I had weird hobbies already), and entering every game from the "102 Programmes pour..." series of books, the TO9 got put to the side at Christmas, replaced by a Sega Master System, using that same handy SCART connector on the Thomson monitor.

But how does this concern you. Well, I've worked with RetroManCave on a Minitel episode not too long ago, and he agreed to do a history of the Thomson micro-computers. I did a fair bit of the research and fact-checking, as well as some needed repairs to the (prototype!) hardware I managed to find for the occasion. The result is this first look at the history of Thomson.



Finally, if you fancy diving into the Thomson computers, there will be an episode coming shortly about the MO5E hardware, and some games worth running on it, on the same YouTube channel.

I'm currently working on bringing the "Teo" TO8D emulator to Flathub, for Linux users. When that's ready, grab some games from the DCMOTO archival site, and have some fun!

I'll also be posting some nitty gritty details about Thomson repairs on my Micro Repairs Twitter feed for the more technically enclined among you.

22 Jun 2018 3:06pm GMT

Suhas Nayak: Behind the GESSourceClip rate

Initial Approach

GES has an effects infrastructure for adding and managing GStreamer elements. Since the rate property uses videorate and pitch elements to work, the idea was to use this existing infrastructure but to the hide the effects from the user as they are required only internally.

Step 1: Use effects

All media elements are truly set on a clip only when it is added to a layer, this involves the construction of GESAudioSource and/or GESVideoSource of the clip. An effect can be added only after these sources have been added to the clip. As a result, the rate property was configured to add pitch and/or videorate as effects only after the sources were added.

Step 2: Hide the effects

To hide the effects from the user - accommodate the hidden effects in GESClip by mimicing the behaviour of a normal effect and maintain a reference to the 'hidden' rate changing effects to not display them as top effects.

A GESClip is a subclass of GESContainer - which gives it the ability to hold the source track elements and the effects. Many operations in GES call the GES_CONTAINER_CHILDREN (clip) method when required to retrieve and make changes to the children of a clip - effects/sources contained in the clip. Since the rate changing effects were not truly hidden, they are contained in the clip and hence showed up as the container's children.

Step 3: Start from scratch

Although the above approach of maintaining hidden effects works to hide them from the user, to hide and make GES sometimes ignore and sometimes utilise the effect API was not only difficult but required making a lot of ugly changes to many parts of GES. It became obvious that a rework of the way things worked was required when running tests on the branch resulted in most of the existing tests failing.

Current Implementation

Mathieu suggested that instead of using the effect API, we should dig a little deeper and add the videorate and pitch elements to the sources of the clip ourself. This genius and simple solution eliminated many of the problems faced in the initial approach.

pitch is simply added to the audiosrcbin- a GstBin of GESAudioSource, while videorate was already in place in a GESVideoSource to adjust frames, as a result, rate is now added as a child property of the audio and video source in GES. The parent GESSource handles creating, linking and managing the audiosrcbin and videosrcbin. Rate property added to GESSourceClip - base class for sources of a GESLayer, changes the rate child property of its sources to function.

The pitch element being from the gst-plugins-bad didn't behave so well and required some fixes for bug 796603 by Matheiu and a followup fix for bug 796613 by myself after which all existing tests of GES passed! (hurray)

While pushing new tests, I realised that since we no longer rely on the effect API, the rate property had to be serialised and deserialised by adding to the xges xml formatter.

Same functionality with ges-launch holds, simply adding rate to command changes speed of a clip.

ges-launch-1.0 +clip ~/path/to/video.mp4 inpoint=10 duration=20 rate=2.0

The above command plays the 20 seconds of the input video from the 10 second mark at a rate of 2.0, that is, for 10 seconds.

The project can saved and loaded back-in using the following commands,

ges-launch-1.0 +clip ~/path/to/video.mp4 inpoint=10 duration=20 rate=2.0 --save project.xges

ges-launch-1.0 --load project.xges

The primary focus of work has been on the getting the GES implementation right. I'm yet to try out a few suggestions I got from GNOME design on the Pitivi UI side of things.

This has been the story so far. You can find my work here and follow issue 2202 for updates. Until next time.

22 Jun 2018 1:31pm GMT

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Robert Foss: Twistyplexing: A Charlieplexing variety

Alt text

The above layout has N = 7, yielding 42 LEDs.

Apart from the symmetry being visually pleasing compared to the normal row & column Charlieplexing layouts, it's relatively easy to spot errors in the schematic.

Avoiding lookup tables

The major advantage of twistyplexing is the ability to avoid lookup tables and replace them with some relatively straight forward arithmetic.

row = led_number / (N - 1)
column = led_number % (N - 1)
anode = (row + column + 1) % N

Of course the cathode still has to be controlled, but its pin id already defined by the row variable above.

Thanks

The Twistyplexing concept was created by Tom Yu, and defined in this blog post.

22 Jun 2018 10:26am GMT

19 Jun 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Eric Anholt: 2018-06-19

Most of the past few weeks have been focused on improving the V3D driver's dEQP/VK-GL-CTS conformance rates. The piglit infrastructure for the conformance tests is strange, and there doesn't seem to be a way in tree to do an approximation of a proper conformance run, so I've had to glue together the deqp and khr_gles profiles, with some overrides for generating the khr_gles test list to be run (since we don't seem to have a way to run a conformance mustpass list). There were lots of deqp failures when I started, due to not having run that suite before, but I'm down to a <.5% failure rate on simulation now.

On the testing front, thanks to Maxime we now have a vc4 testlist in the i-g-t suite. Hopefully the Raspberry Pi foundation can start using that to get some coverage of the vc4 driver when they update their kernel - as is, it seems my PRs mostly languish until Dom has time to hand-test them, which is absurd.

Boris has been working on supporting plane X/Y offsets (panning) with the T tiling format. He has it working on every other tile row, and I'm concerned that the HW may just be broken, since T scanout didn't see a whole lot of testing as far as I know.

I wrote a patchset to core DRM to let drivers control the ordering of calling into bridges, which is important for DSI where you want to have the bridge prepare be before video packets are scanned out, but after the module is ready to send DSI transactions. This should let more DSI panels work with the Raspberry Pi, but the patch needs a rework after review.

19 Jun 2018 12:30am GMT