23 Nov 2020

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Mike Blumenkrantz: Don’t Call It A Comeback

I've Been Here For…

I guess I never left, really, since I've been vicariously living the life of someone who still writes zink patches through reviewing and discussing some great community efforts that are ongoing.

But now I'm back living that life of someone who writes zink patches.

Valve has generously agreed to sponsor my work on graphics-related projects.

For the time being, that work happens to be zink.

Ambition

I don't want to just make a big post about leaving and then come back after a couple weeks like nothing happened.

It's 2020.

We need some sort of positive energy and excitement here.

As such, I'm hereby announcing Operation Oxidize, an ambitious endeavor between me and the formidably skillful Erik Faye-Lund of Collabora.

We're going to land 99% of zink-wip into mainline Mesa by the end of the year, bringing the driver up to basic GL 4.6 and ES 3.2 support with vastly improved performance.

Or at least, that's the goal.

Will we succeed?

Stay tuned to find out!

23 Nov 2020 12:00am GMT

22 Nov 2020

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Mike Blumenkrantz: Roundup 20201122

Another Brief Review

This was a (relatively) quiet week in zink-world. Here's some updates, once more in no particular order:

Stay tuned for further updates.

22 Nov 2020 12:00am GMT

21 Nov 2020

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Hans de Goede: Acer Aspire Switch 10 E SW3-016's and SW5-012's and S1002's horrible EFI firmware

Recently I acquired an Acer Aspire Switch 10 E SW3-016, this device was the main reason for writing my blog post about the shim boot loop. The EFI firmware of this is bad in a number of ways:


  1. It considers its eMMC unbootable unless its ESP contains an EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi file.
  2. But it will actually boot EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi ! (wait what? yes really)
  3. It will only boot from an USB disk connected to its micro-USB connector, not from the USB-A connector on the keyboard-dock.
  4. You must first set a BIOS admin password before you can disable secure-boot (which is necessary to boot home-build kernels without doing your own signing)
  5. Last but not least it has one more nasty "feature", it detect if the OS being booted is Windows, Android or unknown and it updates the ACPI DSDT based in this!

Some more details on the OS detection mis feature. The ACPI "Device (SDHB) node for the MMC controller connected to the SDIO wifi module contains:

Name (WHID, "80860F14")
Name (AHID, "INT33BB")


Depending on what OS the BIOS thinks it is booting it renames one of these 2 to _HID. This is weird given that it will only boot if EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi exists, but it still does this. Worse it looks at the actual contents of EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi for this. It seems that that file must be signed, otherwise it goes in OS unknown mode and keeps the 2 above DSDT bits as is, so there is no _HID defined for the wifi's mmc controller and thus no wifi. I hit this issue when I replaced EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi with grubx64.efi to break the bootloop. grubx64.efi is not signed so the DSDT as Linux saw it contained the above AML code. Using the proper workaround for the bootloop from my previous blog post this bit of the DSDT morphes into:

Name (_HID, "80860F14")
Name (AHID, "INT33BB")


And the wifi works.

The Acer Aspire Switch 10 E SW3-016's firmware also triggers an actual bug / issue in Linux' ACPI implementation, causing the bluetooth to not work. This is discussed in much detail here. I have a patch series fixing this here.

And the older Acer Aspire Switch 10 SW5-012's and S1002's firmware has some similar issues:


  1. It considers its eMMC unbootable unless its ESP contains an EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi file
  2. These models will actually always boot the EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi file, so that is somewhat more sensible.
  3. On the SW5-012 you must first set a BIOS admin password before you can disable secure-boot.
  4. The SW5-012 is missing an ACPI device node for the PWM controller used for controlling the backlight brightness. I guess that the Windows i915 gfx driver just directly pokes the registers (which are in a whole other IP block), rather then relying on a separate PWM driver as Linux does. Unfortunately there is no way to fix this, other then using a DSDT overlay. I have a DSDT overlay for the V1.20 BIOS and only for the v1.20 BIOS available for this here.

Because of 1. and 2. you need to take the following steps to get Linux to boot on the Acer Aspire Switch 10 SW5-012 or the S1002:


  1. Rename the original bootmgfw.efi (so that you can chainload it in the multi-boot case)
  2. Replace bootmgfw.efi with shimia32.efi
  3. Copy EFI/fedora/grubia32.efi to EFI/Microsoft/Boot

This assumes that you have the files from a 32 bit Windows install in your ESP already.

21 Nov 2020 8:58pm GMT

10 Nov 2011

feedPlanet GNOME

Brad Taylor: Reports of Snowy’s death have been greatly exaggerated

Browsing foundation-list recently, I was honored to see Snowy (and Tomboy Online) hosting mentioned as one of the GNOME CEO goals (scroll to the bottom) for 2010! Unfortunately, the pace of Snowy's development has slowed in the last few months, due in part to both Sandy and my schedules. Despite that, we wouldn't want Stormy to get a bad reputation because of our slacking, so we're going to change that.

We're hosting an IRC meeting in the #snowy channel on irc.gimp.net on Saturday, 23 Jan 2010 at 11:00 AM EDT (16:00 GMT, other time zones) to get ourselves organized, and to recruit your help.

So, if you are a graphic designer that wants to help beautify an awesome open source project, if you're a hacker who knows or wants to learn Django, or even if you're just interested in Snowy, stop on by!

See you there!

10 Nov 2011 4:55am GMT

Brad Taylor: Mono Accessibility 2.0 unleashed!

Today, I'm proud to announce the 2.0 release of the Mono Accessibility project. Spanning a year of intensive work and fixing over 500 bugs, this is truly our best release ever.

This release enables all types of users to access System.Windows.Forms and Silverlight applications from Linux using Orca and other ATK-based Assistive Technologies (ATs), as well as access Linux applications from UI Automation (UIA) based ATs.

What's changed since version 1.0?

Added:

What is Mono Accessibility:

The Mono Accessibility project enables Winforms and Silverlight applications to be fully accessible on Linux, and allows Assistive Technologies (ATs) like screen readers and test automation tools that depend on UI Automation APIs to work on Linux.

Mono Accessibility is released under the MIT/X11 license.

Get it!

Mono Accessibility is available for a variety of Linux distributions, including:

A Note About at-spi2

Accessing GTK+ applications with the UIA Client API requires the most recent development version of the new dbus-based at-spi2, which is known to cause system instability.

In Fedora, at-spi2 repeatedly causes GDM to segfault. If you do not need this feature, do not install the latest at-spi2 and atk, or our packages which depend on them, which are at-spi-sharp and AtspiUiaSource.

We are working hard to identify these issues and hope to aid the GNOME Accessibility Team in stabilizing at-spi2 in the near future.

Find out more

Navigate to our homepage for all the latest information, and ways to contact us.

10 Nov 2011 4:55am GMT

Calum Benson: What’s new on the Solaris 11 desktop?

This entry is cross-posted from my Oracle blog… clearly, seasoned GNOME blog readers will be less excited about GNOME 2.30, compiz and Firefox 6 than my audience over there, many of whom have been using GNOME 2.6 on Solaris 10 for the past 7 years :)

Much has been written today about the enterprise and cloud features of Oracle Solaris 11, which was launched today, but what's new for those of us who just like to have the robustness and security of Solaris on our desktop machines? Here are a few of the Solaris 11 desktop highlights:

Solaris 11 is free to download and use for most non-commercial purposes (but IANAL, so do check the OTN License Agreement on the download page first - it's short and sweet, as these things go), and you can download various flavours, including a Live CD and a USB install image, right here.

10 Nov 2011 12:08am GMT

09 Nov 2011

feedPlanet KDE

Cool new stuff in CMake 2.8.6 (2): pkg-config compatible mode added for use e.g. with autotools

After introducing the automoc feature in my last blog, here comes the next part of this series. More will follow.

The new --find-package mode of CMake

Typically, in projects which are built using autotools or handwritten Makefiles, the tool pkg-config is used to find whether and where some library, used by the software, is installed on the current system, and prints the respective command line options for the compiler to stdout.

Since CMake 2.8.6, also CMake can be used additionally to or instead of pkg-config in such projects to find installed libraries.

With version 2.8.6 CMake features the new command line flag --find-package. When called in this mode, CMake produces results compatible to pkg-config, and can thus be used in a similar way.

E.g. to get the compiler command line arguments for compiling an object file, it can be called like this:

   $ cmake --find-package -DNAME=LibXml2 -DLANGUAGE=C -DCOMPILER_ID=GNU -DMODE=COMPILE
   -I/usr/include/libxml2
   $

To get the flags needed for linking, do

   $ cmake --find-package -DNAME=LibXml2 -DLANGUAGE=C -DCOMPILER_ID=GNU -DMODE=LINK
   -rdynamic -lxml2
   $

As result, the flags are printed to stdout, as you can see.

The required parameters are

So, you can insert calls like the above in your hand-written Makefiles.
For using CMake in autotools-based projects, you can use cmake.m4, which is now also installed by CMake.
This is used similar to the pkg-config m4-macro, just that it uses CMake internally instead of pkg-config. So your configure.in could look something like this:

   ...
   PKG_CHECK_MODULES(XFT, xft >= 2.1.0, have_xft=true, have_xft=false)
    if test $have_xft = "true"; then
        AC_MSG_RESULT(Result: CFLAGS: $XFT_CFLAGS LIBS: $XFT_LIBS)
    fi

   CMAKE_FIND_PACKAGE(LibXml2, C, GNU)
   AC_MSG_RESULT(Result: CFLAGS: $LibXml2_CFLAGS LIBS: $LibXml2_LIBS)
   ...

This will define the variables LibXml2_CFLAGS and LibXml2_LIBS, which can then be used in the Makefile.in/Makefiles.

What does that mean for developers of CMake-based libraries ?

You don't have to install pkg-config pc-files anymore, just install a Config.cmake file for CMake, and both CMake-based and also autotools-based or any other projects can make use of your library without problems.
Documentation how this is done can be found here:

What does that mean for developers working on e.g. autotools-based projects, and using a project built with CMake ?

Take a look at the cmake_find_package() m4-macro installed since CMake 2.8.6 in share/aclocal/cmake.m4, it contains documentation, and will help you using that library.
Thanks go to Matthias Kretz of Phonon fame, now working on HPC stuff, who wrote the cmake.m4 from scratch (which was necessary since it had to be BSD-licensed in order to be included in CMake).

Internals

Internally, CMake basically executes a find_package() with the given name, turns the results into the command line options for the compiler and prints them to stdout.
This means it works basically for all packages for which a FindFoo.cmake file exists or which install a FooConfig.cmake file.
There is one issue though: FindFoo.cmake files, which execute try_compile() or try_run() commands internally, are not supported, since this would required setting up and testing the compiler toolchain completely.
It works best for libraries which install a FooConfig.cmake file, since in these cases nothing has to be detected, all the information is already there.

All this stuff is still very new, and has not yet seen wide real world testing.
So, if you use it and find issues, or have suggestions how to improve it, please let me know.

Alex

09 Nov 2011 9:15pm GMT

Debugging nepomuk/virtuoso’s CPU usage

There was a lot of bug fixing regarding nepomuk and its indexing. However you might still get a high CPU-usage. Reporting this is a bit useless unless you can at least give some info about what's happening.

So what you can do is query virtuoso's status. On openSUSE it works like this: first find the .ini file currently in usage to get the port virtuoso is using, connect to virtuoso and finally query virtuoso for its status and running statements. The latter are unfortunately truncated so I would appreciate some hint on how to get around that.

ps aux | grep virtuoso

finds /usr/bin/virtuoso-t +foreground +configfile /tmp/virtuoso_T18122.ini +wait

cat /tmp/virtuoso_T18122.ini | grep Port

finds ServerPort=1111

isql-vt -H localhost -P 1111 -U dba -P dba

which connects to virtuoso

status();

which shows you some info and which queries are keeping the process busy. isql-vt is part of the virtuoso-server package but it might be that only recent packages have it compiled and older packages lack the tools.

Further you can do the following:

If you have any other hints regarding this piece of software feel free to mention them and I will add them to the post.


09 Nov 2011 3:10pm GMT

Help KDE e.V. secure funding for a sprint with just a few clicks

Some weeks ago Lydia blogged about a German bank giving away 1000 euros for each 1000 associations who can get the most votes. Well, until four days ago we were at postion 320, now we are at 735 and falling. Please, read Lydia's post about how to vote and help KDE e.V., it is just a few clicks.

It surprises me KDE e.V. have had only 3652 votes so far. If each people voted three times, which is allowed by the rules, it would give ~1218 people. Is there only 1218 people using KDE in the world?

Just the poll page is in German, but the poll is not limited to German citizens. Anybody can vote and according to the rules you can vote three times with your e-mail.

09 Nov 2011 12:22pm GMT