20 Mar 2019

feedPlanet Gentoo

Agostino Sarubbo: Install Gentoo in less than one minute

I'm pretty sure that the title of this post will catch your attention…and/or maybe your curiosity.

Well..this is something I'm doing since years…and since did not cost too much to make it in a public and usable state, I decided to share my work, to help some people to avoid waste of time and to avoid to be angry when your cloud provider does not offer the gentoo image.

So what are the goals of this project?

  1. Install gentoo on cloud providers that do not offer a Gentoo image (e.g Hetzner)
  2. Install gentoo everywhere in few seconds.

To do a fast installation, we need a stage4….but what is exactly a stage4? In this case the stage4 is composed by the official gentoo stage3 plus grub, some more utilities and some file already configured.

So since the stage4 has already everything to complete the installation, we just need to make some replacement (fstab, grub and so on), install grub on the disk………..and…..it's done (by the auto-installer script)!

At this point I'd expect some people to say…."yeah…it's so simply and logical…why I didn't think about that" - Well, I guess that every gentoo user didn't discover that just after the first installation…so you don't need to blame yourself 🙂

The technical details are covered by the README in the gentoo-stage4 git repository

As said in the README:

So what's more? Just a screenshot of the script in action 🙂

# Gentoo hetzner cloud
# Gentoo stage4
# Gentoo cloud

20 Mar 2019 6:35pm GMT

22 Feb 2019

feedPlanet Gentoo

Thomas Raschbacher: Postgresql major version upgrade (gentoo)

Just did an upgrade from postgres 10.x to 11.x on a test machine..

The guide on the Gentoo Wiki is pretty good, but a few things I forgot at first:

First off when initializing the new cluster with "emerge --config =dev-db/postgresql-11.1" making sure the DB init options are the same as the old cluster. They are stored in /etc/conf.d/postgresql-XX.Y so just make sure PG_INITDB_OPTS collation ,.. match - if not delete the new cluster and re-run emerge --config ;)

The second thing was pg_hba.conf: make sure to re-add extra user/db/connection permissions again (in my case I ran diff and then just copied the old config file as the only difference was the extra permissions I had added)

The third thing was postgresql.conf: here I forgot to make sure listen_addresses and port are the same as in the old config (I did not copy this one as there are a lot more differences here. -- and of course check the rest of the config file too (diff is your friend ;) )

other than that pg_upgrade worked really well for me and it is now up and running agian.

22 Feb 2019 10:37am GMT

20 Feb 2019

feedPlanet Gentoo

Michał Górny: gen-revoke: extending revocation certificates to subkeys

Traditionally, OpenPGP revocation certificates are used as a last resort. You are expected to generate one for your primary key and keep it in a secure location. If you ever lose the secret portion of the key and are unable to revoke it any other way, you import the revocation certificate and submit the updated key to keyservers. However, there is another interesting use for revocation certificates - revoking shared organization keys.

Let's take Gentoo, for example. We are using a few keys needed to perform automated signatures on servers. For this reason, the key is especially exposed to attacks and we want to be able to revoke it quickly if the need arises. Now, we really do not want to have every single Infra member hold a copy of the secret primary key. However, we can give Infra members revocation certificates instead. This way, they maintain the possibility of revoking the key without unnecessarily increasing its exposure.

The problem with traditional revocation certificates is that they are supported for the purpose of revoking the primary key only. In our security model, the primary key is well protected, compared to subkeys that are totally exposed. Therefore, it is superfluous to revoke the complete key when only a subkey is compromised. To resolve this limitation, gen-revoke tool was created that can create exported revocation signatures for both the primary key and subkeys.

Technical background

The OpenPGP key (v4, as defined by RFC 4880) consists of a primary key, one or more UIDs and zero or more subkeys. Each of those keys and UIDs can include zero or more signature packets. Those packets bind information to the specific key or UID, and their authenticity is confirmed by a signature made using the secret portion of a primary key.

Signatures made by the key's owner are called self-signatures. The most basic form of them serve as a binding between the primary key and its subkeys and UIDs. Since both those classes of objects are created independently of the primary key, self-signatures are necessary to distinguish authentic subkeys and UIDs created by the key owner from potential fakes. Appropriately, GnuPG will only accept subkeys and UIDs that have valid self-signature.

One specific type of signatures are revocation signatures. Those signatures indicate that the relevant key, subkey or UID has been revoked. If a revocation signature is found, it takes precedence over any other kinds of signatures and prevents the revoked object from being further used.

Key updates are means of distributing new data associated with the key. What's important is that during an update the key is not replaced by a new one. Instead, GnuPG collects all the new data (subkeys, UIDs, signatures) and adds it to the local copy of the key. The validity of this data is verified against appropriate signatures. Appropriately, anyone can submit a key update to the keyserver, provided that the new data includes valid signatures. Similarly to local GnuPG instance, the keyserver is going to update its copy of the key rather than replacing it.

Revocation certificates specifically make use of this property. Technically, a revocation certificate is simply an exported form of a revocation signature, signed using the owner's primary key. As long as it's not on the key (i.e. GnuPG does not see it), it does not do anything. When it's imported, GnuPG adds it to the key. Further submissions and exports include it, effectively distributing it to all copies of the key.

gen-revoke builds on this idea. It creates and exports revocation signatures for the primary key and subkeys. Due to implementation limitations (and for better compatibility), rather than exporting the signature alone it exports a minimal copy of the relevant key. This copy can be imported just like any other key export, and it causes the revocation signature to be added to the key. Afterwards, it can be exported and distributed just like a revocation done directly on the key.

Usage

To use the script, you need to have the secret portion of the primary key available, and public encryption keys for all the people who are supposed to obtain a copy of the revocation signatures (recipients).

The script takes at least two parameters: an identifier of the key for which revocation signatures should be created, followed by one or more e-mail addresses of signature recipients. It creates revocation signatures both for the primary key and for all valid subkeys, for all the people specified.

The signatures are written into the current directory as key exports and are encrypted to each specified person. They should be distributed afterwards, and kept securely by all the individuals. If a need to revoke either a subkey or the primary key arises, the first person available can decrypt the signature, import it and send the resulting key to keyservers.

Additionally, each signature includes a comment specifying the person it was created for. This comment will afterwards be displayed by GnuPG if one of the revocation signatures is imported. This provides a clear audit trace as to who revoked the key.

Security considerations

Each of the revocation signatures can be used by an attacker to disable the key in question. The signatures are protected through encryption. Therefore, the system is vulnerable to the key of a single signature owner being compromised.

However, this is considerably safer than the equivalent option of distributing the secret portion of the primary key. In the latter case, the attacker would be able to completely compromise the key and use it for malicious purposes; in the former, it is only capable of revoking the key and therefore causing some frustration. Furthermore, the revocation comment helps identifying the compromised user.

The tradeoff between reliability and security can be adjusted by changing the number of revocation signature holders.

20 Feb 2019 1:18pm GMT