15 Dec 2017

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Christian Schaller: Some predictions for 2018

So I spent a few hours polishing my crystal ball today, so here are some predictions for Linux on the Desktop in 2018. The advantage of course for me to publish these now is that I can then later selectively quote the ones I got right to prove my brilliance and the internet can selectively quote the ones I got wrong to prove my stupidity :)

Prediction 1: Meson becomes the defacto build system of the Linux community

Meson has been going from strength to strength this year and a lot of projects
which passed on earlier attempts to replace autotools has adopted it. I predict this
trend will continue in 2018 and that by the end of the year everyone agrees that Meson
has replaced autotools as the Linux community build system of choice. That said I am not
convinced the Linux kernel itself will adopt Meson in 2018.

Prediction 2: Rust puts itself on a clear trajectory to replace C and C++ for low level programming

Another rising start of 2017 is the programming language Rust. And while its pace of adoption
will be slower than Meson I do believe that by the time 2018 comes to a close the general opinion is
that Rust is the future of low level programming, replacing old favorites like C and C++. Major projects
like GNOME and GStreamer are already adopting Rust at a rapid pace and I believe even more projects will
join them in 2018.

Prediction 3: Apples decline as a PC vendor becomes obvious

Ever since Steve Jobs died it has become quite clear in my opinion that the emphasis
on the traditional desktop is fading from Apple. The pace of hardware refreshes seems
to be slowing and MacOS X seems to be going more and more stale. Some pundits have already
started pointing this out and I predict that in 2018 Apple will be no longer consider the
cool kid on the block for people looking for laptops, especially among the tech savvy crowd.
Hopefully a good opportunity for Linux on the desktop to assert itself more.

Prediction 4: Traditional distro packaging for desktop applications
will start fading away in favour of Flatpak

From where I am standing I think 2018 will be the breakout year for Flatpak as a replacement
for gettings your desktop applications as RPMS or debs. I predict that by the end of 2018 more or
less every Linux Desktop user will be at least running 1 flatpak on their system.

Prediction 5: Linux Graphics competitive across the board

I think 2018 will be a breakout year for Linux graphics support. I think our GPU drivers and API will be competitive with any other platform both in completeness and performance. So by the end of 2018 I predict that you will see Linux game ports by major porting houses
like Aspyr and Feral that perform just as well as their Windows counterparts. What is more I also predict that by the end of 2018 discreet graphics will be considered a solved problem on Linux.

Prediction 6: H265 will be considered a failure

I predict that by the end of 2018 H265 will be considered a failed codec effort and the era of royalty bearing media codecs will effectively start coming to and end. H264 will be considered the last successful royalty bearing codec and all new codecs coming out will
all be open source and royalty free.

15 Dec 2017 8:53pm GMT

Bastien Nocera: More Bluetooth (and gaming) features

In the midst of post-release bug fixing, we've also added a fair number of new features to our stack. As usual, new features span a number of different components, so integrators will have to be careful picking up all the components when, well, integrating.

PS3 clones joypads support

Do you have a PlayStation 3 joypad that feels just a little bit "off"? You can't find the Sony logo anywhere on it? The figures on the face buttons look like barbed wire? And if it were a YouTube video, it would say "No copyright intended"?


Bingo. When plugged in via USB, those devices advertise themselves as SHANWAN or Gasia, and implement the bare minimum to work when plugged into a PlayStation 3 console. But as a Linux computer would behave slightly differently, we need to fix a couple of things.

The first fix was simple, but necessary to be able to do any work: disable the rumble motor that starts as soon as you plug the pad through USB.

Once that's done, we could work around the fact that the device isn't Bluetooth compliant, and hard-code the HID service it's supposed to offer.

Bluetooth LE Battery reporting

Bluetooth Low Energy is the new-fangled (7-year old) protocol for low throughput devices, from a single coin-cell powered sensor, to input devices. What's great is that there's finally a standardised way for devices to export their battery statuses. I've added support for this in BlueZ, which UPower then picks up for desktop integration goodness.

There are a number of Bluetooth LE joypads available for pickup, including a few that should be firmware upgradeable. Look for "Bluetooth 4" as well as "Bluetooth LE" when doing your holiday shopping.

gnome-bluetooth work

Finally, this is the boring part. Benjamin and I reworked code that's internal to gnome-bluetooth, as used in the Settings panel as well as the Shell, to make it use modern facilities like GDBusObjectManager. The overall effect of this is, less code, less brittle and more reactive when Bluetooth adapters come and go, such as when using airplane mode.

Apart from the kernel patch mentioned above (you'll know if you need it :), those features have been integrated in UPower 0.99.7 and in the upcoming BlueZ 5.48. And they will of course be available in Fedora, both in rawhide and as updates to Fedora 27 as soon as the releases have been done and built.

GG!

15 Dec 2017 3:57pm GMT

11 Dec 2017

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Eric Anholt: 2017-12-11

It's been a while since I posted a TWIV update, so this one will be big:

For VC5 GL features:

While running DEQP tests on all this (which unfortunately don't complete yet due to running out of memory on my 7268 without swap), I've also rebased my Vulkan series and started on implementing image layout for it.

I also tested Timothy Arceri's gallium NIR linking pass. The goal of that is to pack and dead-code eliminate varyings up in shared code. It's a net ~0 effect on vc4 currently, but it will help vc5, and I may be able to dead-code eliminate some of the vc4 compiler backend now that the IR coming in to the driver is cleaner.

On the VC4 front, Boris has posted a series for performance counter support. This was a pretty big piece of work, and our hope is that with the addition of performance counters we'll be able to dig into those workloads where vc4 is slower than the closed driver and actually fix them. Unfortunately he hasn't managed to build frameretrace yet, so we haven't really tested it on its final intended workload.

For VC4 GL, I did a bit of work on minetest performance, improving the game's fps from around 15 to around 17. Its desktop GL renderer is really unfortunate, using a lot of immediate-mode GL, but I was completely unable to get its GLES renderer branch to build. It also lacks a reproducable/scriptable benchmark mode, so most of my testing was against an apitrace, which is very hard to get useful performance data from.

I debugged a crash in vc4 with large vertex counts that a user had reported, landed a fix for a kernel memory leak, and landed Dave Stevenson's HVS format support (part of his work on getting video decode into vc4 GL).

Finally, I did a bit of research and work to help unblock Dave Stevenson's unicam driver (the open source camera driver). Now that we have an ack for the DT binding, we should be able to get it merged for 4.16!

11 Dec 2017 12:30am GMT