23 May 2019

feedPlanet GNOME

Andy Wingo: bigint shipping in firefox!

I am delighted to share with folks the results of a project I have been helping out on for the last few months: implementation of "BigInt" in Firefox, which is finally shipping in Firefox 68 (beta).

what's a bigint?

BigInts are a new kind of JavaScript primitive value, like numbers or strings. A BigInt is a true integer: it can take on the value of any finite integer (subject to some arbitrarily large implementation-defined limits, such as the amount of memory in your machine). This contrasts with JavaScript number values, which have the well-known property of only being able to precisely represent integers between -253 and 253.

BigInts are written like "normal" integers, but with an n suffix:

var a = 1n;
var b = a + 42n;
b << 64n
// result: 793209995169510719488n

With the bigint proposal, the usual mathematical operations (+, -, *, /, %, <<, >>, **, and the comparison operators) are extended to operate on bigint values. As a new kind of primitive value, bigint values have their own typeof:

typeof 1n
// result: 'bigint'

Besides allowing for more kinds of math to be easily and efficiently expressed, BigInt also allows for better interoperability with systems that use 64-bit numbers, such as "inodes" in file systems, WebAssembly i64 values, high-precision timers, and so on.

You can read more about the BigInt feature over on MDN, as usual. You might also like this short article on BigInt basics that V8 engineer Mathias Bynens wrote when Chrome shipped support for BigInt last year. There is an accompanying language implementation article as well, for those of y'all that enjoy the nitties and the gritties.

can i ship it?

To try out BigInt in Firefox, simply download a copy of Firefox Beta. This version of Firefox will be fully released to the public in a few weeks, on July 9th. If you're reading this in the future, I'm talking about Firefox 68.

BigInt is also shipping already in V8 and Chrome, and my colleague Caio Lima has an project in progress to implement it in JavaScriptCore / WebKit / Safari. Depending on your target audience, BigInt might be deployable already!

thanks

I must mention that my role in the BigInt work was relatively small; my Igalia colleague Robin Templeton did the bulk of the BigInt implementation work in Firefox, so large ups to them. Hearty thanks also to Mozilla's Jan de Mooij and Jeff Walden for their patient and detailed code reviews.

Thanks as well to the V8 engineers for their open source implementation of BigInt fundamental algorithms, as we used many of them in Firefox.

Finally, I need to make one big thank-you, and I hope that you will join me in expressing it. The road to ship anything in a web browser is long; besides the "simple matter of programming" that it is to implement a feature, you need a specification with buy-in from implementors and web standards people, you need a good working relationship with a browser vendor, you need willing technical reviewers, you need to follow up on the inevitable security bugs that any browser change causes, and all of this takes time. It's all predicated on having the backing of an organization that's foresighted enough to invest in this kind of long-term, high-reward platform engineering.

In that regard I think all people that work on the web platform should send a big shout-out to Tech at Bloomberg for making BigInt possible by underwriting all of Igalia's work in this area. Thank you, Bloomberg, and happy hacking!

23 May 2019 12:13pm GMT

22 May 2019

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary

Thank you all for the large amount of feedback I have received after my previous Wayland Itches blog post. I've received over 40 mails, below is an attempt at summarizing all the mails.

Highlights

1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here.

2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.

We need some sort of transition period. So when I find some time for this, I plan to submit a merge-requests which optionally makes gnome-shell/mutter start Xwayland with an xauth file, like how it is done when running in GNOME on Xorg mode. This will be controlled by a gsettings option, which will probably default to off upstream and then distros can choice to override this for now, giving us a transition period

Requests for features implemented as external programs on X11

There are various features which can be implemented as external programs
on X11, but because of the tighter security need to be integrated into the
compositor with Wayland:

App specific problems

Miscellaneous problems

Hard to fix issues

Problems with other compositors then GNOME3 / mutter

I've also received several reports about issues when using another Wayland compositor as GNOME / mutter (Weston, KDE, Sway). I'm sorry but I have not looked very closely into these reports. I believe that it is great that Linux users have multiple Desktop Environments to choose from and I wish for the other DEs to thrive. But there are only so many hours in a day so I've chosen to mainly focus on GNOME.

22 May 2019 7:01pm GMT

Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)

First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).

As I see it there are currently 2 big issues when running games under Wayland:

1. Many games show as a smal centered image with a black border (letterbox) around the image when running fullscreen.

For 2D games this is fixed by switching to SDL2 which will transparently scale the pixmap the game renders to the desktop resolution. This assumes that 2D games in general do not demand a lot of performance and thus will not run into performance issues when introducing an extra scaling step. A problem here is that many games still use SDL1.2 (and some games do not use SDL at all).

I plan to look into the recently announced SDL1.2 compatibility wrapper around SDL2. If this works well this should fix this issue for all SDL1.2 2D games, by making them use SDL2 under the hood.

For 3D games this can be fixed by rendering at the desktop resolution, but this might be slow and rendering at a lower resolution leads to the letterbox issue.

Recently mutter has has grown support for the WPviewport extension, which allows Wayland apps to tell the compositor to scale the pixmap the app gives to the compositor before presenting it. If we add support to SDL2's Wayland backend for this then, this can be used to allow rendering 3D apps at a lower resolution and still have them fill the entire screen.

Unfortunately there are 2 problems with this plan:


  1. SDL2 by default uses its x11 backend, not its wayland backend. I'm not sure what fixes need to be done to change this, at a minimum we need a fix at either the SDL or mutter side for this issue, which is going to be tricky.
  2. This only helps for SDL2 apps, again hopefully the SDL1.2 compatibility wrapper for SDL2 can help here, at least for games using SDL.

2. Fullscreen performance is bad with many games.

Since under Wayland games cannot change the monitor resolution, they need to either render at the full desktop resolution, which can be very slow; or they render at a lower resolution and then need to do an extra scaling step each frame.

If we manage to make SDL2's Wayland backend the default and then add WPviewport support to it then this should help by reducing an extra memcpy/blit of a desktop-sized pixmap. Currently what apps which use scaling do is:


  1. render lower-res-pixmap;
  2. scale lower-res-pixmap to desktop-res-pixmap
  3. give desktop-res-pixmap to the compositor;
  4. compositor does a hardware blit of the desktop-res-pixmap to the framebuffer.

With viewport support this becomes:


  1. render lower-res-pixmap;
  2. give low-res-pixmap to the compositor;
  3. compositor uses hardware to do a scaling blit from the low-res-pixmap to the desktop-res framebuffer

Also with viewport support, the compositor could in the case of there only being the one fullscreen app even keep the framebuffer in lowres and use a hardware scaling drm-plane to send the low-res framebuffer scaled to desktop-res to the output while only reading the low-res framebuffer from memory saving a ton of memory bandwidth. But this optimization is going to be a challenge to pull off.

22 May 2019 4:44pm GMT

feedPlanet GNOME

Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)

First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).

As I see it there are currently 2 big issues when running games under Wayland:

1. Many games show as a smal centered image with a black border (letterbox) around the image when running fullscreen.

For 2D games this is fixed by switching to SDL2 which will transparently scale the pixmap the game renders to the desktop resolution. This assumes that 2D games in general do not demand a lot of performance and thus will not run into performance issues when introducing an extra scaling step. A problem here is that many games still use SDL1.2 (and some games do not use SDL at all).

I plan to look into the recently announced SDL1.2 compatibility wrapper around SDL2. If this works well this should fix this issue for all SDL1.2 2D games, by making them use SDL2 under the hood.

For 3D games this can be fixed by rendering at the desktop resolution, but this might be slow and rendering at a lower resolution leads to the letterbox issue.

Recently mutter has has grown support for the WPviewport extension, which allows Wayland apps to tell the compositor to scale the pixmap the app gives to the compositor before presenting it. If we add support to SDL2's Wayland backend for this then, this can be used to allow rendering 3D apps at a lower resolution and still have them fill the entire screen.

Unfortunately there are 2 problems with this plan:


  1. SDL2 by default uses its x11 backend, not its wayland backend. I'm not sure what fixes need to be done to change this, at a minimum we need a fix at either the SDL or mutter side for this issue, which is going to be tricky.
  2. This only helps for SDL2 apps, again hopefully the SDL1.2 compatibility wrapper for SDL2 can help here, at least for games using SDL.

2. Fullscreen performance is bad with many games.

Since under Wayland games cannot change the monitor resolution, they need to either render at the full desktop resolution, which can be very slow; or they render at a lower resolution and then need to do an extra scaling step each frame.

If we manage to make SDL2's Wayland backend the default and then add WPviewport support to it then this should help by reducing an extra memcpy/blit of a desktop-sized pixmap. Currently what apps which use scaling do is:


  1. render lower-res-pixmap;
  2. scale lower-res-pixmap to desktop-res-pixmap
  3. give desktop-res-pixmap to the compositor;
  4. compositor does a hardware blit of the desktop-res-pixmap to the framebuffer.

With viewport support this becomes:


  1. render lower-res-pixmap;
  2. give low-res-pixmap to the compositor;
  3. compositor uses hardware to do a scaling blit from the low-res-pixmap to the desktop-res framebuffer

Also with viewport support, the compositor could in the case of there only being the one fullscreen app even keep the framebuffer in lowres and use a hardware scaling drm-plane to send the low-res framebuffer scaled to desktop-res to the output while only reading the low-res framebuffer from memory saving a ton of memory bandwidth. But this optimization is going to be a challenge to pull off.

22 May 2019 4:44pm GMT

Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary

Thank you all for the large amount of feedback I have received after my previous Wayland Itches blog post. I've received over 40 mails, below is an attempt at summarizing all the mails.

Highlights

1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here.

2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.

We need some sort of transition period. So when I find some time for this, I plan to submit a merge-requests which optionally makes gnome-shell/mutter start Xwayland with an xauth file, like how it is done when running in GNOME on Xorg mode. This will be controlled by a gsettings option, which will probably default to off upstream and then distros can choice to override this for now, giving us a transition period

Requests for features implemented as external programs on X11

There are various features which can be implemented as external programs
on X11, but because of the tighter security need to be integrated into the
compositor with Wayland:

App specific problems

Miscellaneous problems

Hard to fix issues

Problems with other compositors then GNOME3 / mutter

I've also received several reports about issues when using another Wayland compositor as GNOME / mutter (Weston, KDE, Sway). I'm sorry but I have not looked very closely into these reports. I believe that it is great that Linux users have multiple Desktop Environments to choose from and I wish for the other DEs to thrive. But there are only so many hours in a day so I've chosen to mainly focus on GNOME.

22 May 2019 4:26pm GMT

21 May 2019

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Hans de Goede: Improved Logitech wireless device support in kernel 5.2

The just released 5.2-rc1 kernel includes improved support for Logitech wireless keyboards and mice. Until now we were relying on the generic HID keyboard and mouse emulation for 27 MHz and non-unifying 2.4 GHz wireless receivers.

Starting with the 5.2 kernel instead we actually look at the devices behind the receiver. This allows us to provide battery monitoring support and to have per device quirks, like device specific HID-code to evdev-code mappings where necessary. Until now device specific quirks where not possible because the receivers have a generic product-id which is the same independent of the device behind the receiver.

The per device key-mapping is especially important for 27MHz wireless devices, these use the same HID-code for Fn + F1 to Fn + F12 for all devices, but the markings on the keys differ per model. Sofar it was impossible for Linux to get the mapping for this right, but now that we have per device product-ids for the devices behind the receiver we can finally fix this. As is the case with other devices with vendor specific mappings, the actual mapping is done in userspace through hwdb.

If you have a 27 MHz device (often using this receiver, keyboard marked as canada 210 or canada 310 at the bottom). Please give 5.2 a try. Download the latest 60-keyboard.hwdb file and place it in /lib/udev/hwdb.d (replacing the existing file) and then run "sudo udevadm hwdb --update", before booting into the 5.2 kernel. Then run "sudo evemu-record" select your keyboard and try Fn + F1 to Fn + F12 and any other special keys. If any keys do not work, edit 60-keyboard.hwdb, search for Logitech and add an entry for your keyboard, see the existing Logitech entries. After editing you need to re-run "sudo udevadm hwdb --update", followed by "sudo udevadm trigger" for the changes to take effect. Once you have a working entry, submit a pull-req to systemd to get the changes upstream. If you need any help drop me an email.

We still have some old code for the generic HID emulation for 27 MHz receivers with a product-id of c50c, these should work fine with the new code, but we've been unable to test this. I would really like to move the c50c id over to the new code and remove all the old code. If you've a 27 MHz Logitech device, please run lsusb, if your device has a product-id of c50c and you are willing to test, please drop me an email.

Likewise I suspect that 2.4GHz receivers with a product-id of c531 should work fine with the new support for non-unifying 2.4 GHz receivers, if you have one of those also please drop me an email.

21 May 2019 8:26am GMT