22 Jun 2018

feedThe Official Google Blog

Meet the 2018 Google News Initiative Journalism Fellows

In 2013, we began a News Fellows program, as an investment in the next generation of digital reporters. The fellowship is an important part of the Google News Initiative's commitment to strengthen the quality of journalism and empower news organizations to make use of technology, through pairing students interested in journalism and technology with prestigious media organizations around the world.

Since its launch, the program has expanded into 12 regions with an alumni network of over 300 journalists and innovators across the world. This month, we welcomed the 2018 U.S. Google News Initiative Fellows to Mountain View ahead of their summer fellowships at journalism nonprofits across the country:


  • YanWu.jpg

    Yan Wu, Northeastern University, Center for Investigative Reporting. Yan Wu is a designer and coder turned interactive storyteller. As a graphic intern at The Boston Globe, she had not only worked on projects like 11 months, 1 president, 2471 tweets independently, but also collaborated with the Pulitzer prize winning Spotlight team and other developers on the race series.

  • JulieChristie.JPG

    Julie Christie, Temple University, Investigative Reporters & Editors. Julie Christie is almost a senior at Temple University in the Klein College of Media and Communication, where she's studying journalism. She's currently the Enterprise Editor at The Temple News, the university's independent student newspaper.

  • MarleeBaldridge.jpg

    Marlee Baldridge, University of Missouri, Nieman Journalism Lab. Marlee is a senior studying entrepreneurial journalism at the University of Missouri. A native of Harrisburg, Missouri (population 289), she joined the inaugural Potter Digital Ambassador program and helped integrate sustainable video and social strategies into the reporting of a rural Missouri newspaper

  • Pankhuri Kumar - Headshot.JPG

    Pankhuri Kumar, Columbia University, Pew. Pankhuri is currently completing a dual degree in Journalism and CS at Columbia University. With a math and CS background, she hopes to pursue a career in interactive and computational journalism.

  • TaylorBlatchford headshot.jpg

    Taylor Blatchford, University of Missouri, Poynter. Taylor Blatchford graduated from the University of Missouri with a degree in investigative and international journalism. She leads a team focused on bringing community engagement into the reporting process at the Columbia Missourian, a daily city newspaper.

  • Riley_Wong_headshot_Jan2018_square.jpeg

    Riley Wong, University of Pennsylvania,ProPublica. Riley Wong conducts machine learning and data science research for healthcare. They graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 2017 in computer science. Their passions include social impact, QTPOC community building, music, and art.

  • CorinneOsnos.png

    Corinne Osnos, Northwestern University, Matter. Corinne is a graduate of Northwestern University, where she studied media innovation and entrepreneurship. As a research assistant for The Membership Puzzle Project, Corinne performed UX research on public radio sites and is now conducting qualitative research on Burning Man.

  • Erin_MCAWEENEY.jpg

    Erin McAweeney, University of Washington-Seattle,Witness. Erin is a researcher and technologist working in data journalism, information ethics, and algorithmic bias. In her undergrad she was an editor for a non-profit street paper that provided employment and an outlet for the marginalized homeless population in her community.

22 Jun 2018 8:00pm GMT

With summer ahead, what the world searched for this week

Each week, we take a look at the top trending topics in Search for a sense of what the world is thinking about. Here's a look at a few of the trending searches this week-some playful and some serious-with data from the Google News Lab.

[Insert header pun here … punalty intended]

This week, fans around the world put the Gooooooooooogle in goooooooooooal!, making the World Cup the single biggest topic in Search. Everybody loves a home team, but it's Brazil that's leading searches globally. Meh about the players but love the game? Get in on the action with "Drills and skills" videos on YouTube; their views have increased six times since the last FIFA World Cup. And you can keep track of all your favorite teams and players with Google Trends.

The best part of the world's best lasagna

Amid searches for "best in the world," the top contenders were "best soccer player in the world" (because World Cup, see above) and "best restaurants in the world," since the list of top 50 restaurants in the world was released this week. Topping the list is an Italian eatery whose menu listings include "an eel swimming up the Po river" and "the crunchy part of the lasagna." Clearly they're onto something ... the top searched "world's best" food is lasagna, which maybe you'd pair with the next item on the list, "world's best beer."

The sun never sets on party ideas

If you found that beer, hopefully you sipped it on it yesterday-it was summer solstice, the longest day of the year. And if that lager rendered you pensive, you may have joined those who wondered, "what is the summer solstice?" and, soberly, "when does summer end?" Perk up while the sun's up: "summer solstice party ideas" was the top related query to the phenomenon, and no place searched for the solstice more than the U.K., where nearly 10,000 people gathered to celebrate at Stonehenge.

Summer solstice playlist

Queen Bey and the queen's consort Jay-Z reign again, dropping a surprise album, "Everything Is Love," last weekend. Search interest went up for both Bey and Jay in the U.S., 92 percent and 130 percent respectively, but Beyoncé was searched more than Jay-Z in every U.S. state. Jay-Z's streaming platform Tidal also got its own wave of searches: interest in Tidal spiked 267 percent in the past week. The album release included a masterpiece of a music video at the Louvre, prompting people to search "How much does it cost to rent out the Louvre?" and "Where is the Mona Lisa?"

Crisis at the border

On a more serious note, the world turned its attention to the U.S.-Mexico border this week, as anger erupted over immigrant children being separated from their families and held at migrant detention centers. A viral photo of a young girl caused a 3000 percent spike in searches for "crying toddler at border." Searches for the Secretary of Homeland Security spiked by over 5000 percent, as did searches for former First Lady Laura Bush, who spoke out against the separation. The top "how to help" questions this week were "How to help immigrant children?" and "How to help families separated at the border?" as people searched for ways to contribute.


22 Jun 2018 6:30pm GMT

Get verified to manage your presence on Google

When you search for well-known people, organizations and things on Google, you'll often come across a Knowledge Panel on the results page-a box with an overview of key information and links to resources to help you go deeper.


Individuals and organizations with Knowledge Panels can use our verification process to claim their panels and provide authoritative feedback on the information and images presented. Now we're updating that process as well as extending verification eligibility to more entities.


Any person, organization, sports team, event and media property with a Knowledge Panel is eligible to get verified and suggest edits to the information shown. Simply search for your name or organization on Search and click or tap the prompt below the Knowledge Panel to begin the verification process.
Verified on Google

Once you're verified, you can suggest factual changes to information in your Knowledge Panel and suggest a featured image. You can learn more about how to provide this feedback in our help center.


We're always working on ways to improve Search to ensure you find the most relevant, accurate information possible. We hope that by giving individuals and entities an improved way to help us get it right if something's off, we get closer to that goal.


22 Jun 2018 5:00pm GMT

feedTalkAndroid

Google updates the TalkBack app and renames it to Android Accessibility Suite

Not everyone has 20/20 sight, those of us with impaired vision might be familiar with the TalkBack app that aids smartphone navigation with its spoken feedback. The app has just received an update, and as it so often does, Google has also decided to rename the TalkBack app to the Android Accessibility Suite in the […]


Come comment on this article: Google updates the TalkBack app and renames it to Android Accessibility Suite

Visit TalkAndroid

22 Jun 2018 2:46pm GMT

[TA Deals] We’re giving away a SNES Classic Edition through Talk Android Deals!

Did you want a SNES Classic but couldn't find any in stock over the holidays? Don't worry, we've got your back. We're giving away one of Nintendo's retro consoles through Talk Android Deals, and it's incredibly simple to enter the contest. This console includes a ton of classic games, including hits like The Legend of […]


Come comment on this article: [TA Deals] We're giving away a SNES Classic Edition through Talk Android Deals!

Visit TalkAndroid

22 Jun 2018 2:00pm GMT

[Deal] Save up to 43% on these Earphones and Bluetooth Speakers from Anker

Listening to music when you are out and about is one of life's greatest pleasures. And whether it's hip-hop, rock, or even some trashy euro hits, you can count on Anker having the earphones or speakers to suit your every need as well as your budget with savings of up to 43%. As with all Anker-branded […]


Come comment on this article: [Deal] Save up to 43% on these Earphones and Bluetooth Speakers from Anker

Visit TalkAndroid

22 Jun 2018 2:00pm GMT

21 Jun 2018

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Android Studio 3.2 Beta

Posted by Jamal Eason, Product Manager, Android

Starting today, you can download Android Studio 3.2 Beta. Previewed at Google I/O 2018, the latest release of the official Android IDE is focused on helping onboard you to all the new features launched around Google I/O -- Android JetPack, Android P Developer Preview, and the new Android App Bundle format. There are also several other exciting new features included in Android Studio 3.2 to accelerate your app development, such as Emulator Snapshots and the Energy Profiler.

As the usage of Android Studio has grown in the 3.5 years since version 1.0, we have also become increasingly obsessed with quality. We continue to invest in quality because we know that millions of app developers spend almost everyday in Android Studio and need a reliable set of tools. Stability, build times, and other quality work will be the primary focus for our next release once we finish Android Studio 3.2. We also did not want to wait, so we have made checkins to address memory leaks and performance issues as well as fixed more than 450 bugs. Thank you for the continued feedback and please keep it coming so we can focus on the areas you care about most in the next version of Android Studio. If want to try out the latest features, and assess the improvements in quality, you can download Android Studio on the beta release channel.

What is inside of Android Studio 3.2

Building on the canary release of Android Studio 3.2, the Beta release includes:

Build Android App Bundle

Android Emulator Snapshots

Energy Profiler

Check out the full write-up of all the major features organized by development flow listed below and on the canary blog:

Develop
  • Navigation Editor
  • AndroidX Refactoring
  • Sample Data
  • Material Design Update
  • Android Slices
  • CMakeList editing
  • What's New Assistant
  • New Lint Checks
  • Intellij Platform Update

Build

  • Android App Bundle
  • D8 Desugaring
  • R8 Optimizer
Test
  • Android Emulator Snapshots
  • Screen Record in Android Emulator
  • Virtual Scene Android Emulator Camera
  • ADB Connection Assistant

Optimize

  • Energy Profiler
  • System Trace
  • Profiler Sessions
  • Automatic CPU Recording
  • JNI Reference Tracking

Sessions at Google I/O '18

With the release of Android Studio 3.2 at Google I/O '18, the Android Studio team also presented a series of sessions about Android Studio. Watch the following videos to see the latest features in action and to get tips & tricks on how to use Android Studio:

Download & Feedback

Download the latest version of Android Studio 3.2 from the beta channel download page. If you are using a previous versions of Android Studio, make sure you update to Android Studio Beta 1 or higher. If you also want to maintain a stable version of Android Studio, you can run the stable release version and beta release versions of Android Studio at the same time. Learn more.

To use the mentioned Android Emulator features make sure you are running at least Android Emulator v27.3+ downloaded via the Android Studio SDK Manager.

Please note, to ensure we maintain product quality, some of the features you saw in the canary channel like Navigation Editor are not enabled by default. To turn on canary release channel features go to File → Settings → Experimental → Editor → Enable Navigation Editor.

If you find a bug or issue, feel free to file an issue. Connect with us -- the Android Studio development team ‐ on our Google+ page or on Twitter.

21 Jun 2018 11:53pm GMT

Android Things client library for Google Cloud IoT Core

Posted by Wayne Piekarski, Developer Advocate for IoT +WaynePiekarski @WaynePiekarski

We're releasing a client library to make it easy to use Google Cloud IoT Core from Android Things devices. With just a few lines of code, you can easily connect to the IoT Core MQTT bridge, authenticate the device, publish device telemetry and state, subscribe to configuration changes, and handle errors and network outages.

What is Cloud IoT Core?

Cloud IoT Core is a fully managed service on Google Cloud Platform that allows you to easily and securely connect, manage, and ingest data from millions of globally dispersed devices. Cloud IoT Core, in combination with other services which make up Google's Cloud IoT platform, provides a complete solution for collecting, processing, analyzing, and visualizing IoT data in real time, to support improved operational efficiency, compliance, or revenue management. Android Things is designed to support everything from collecting telemetry data to powerful computer vision, audio processing, and machine learning applications, all on device, and using Cloud IoT Core, push your data into Google Cloud Platform for further analysis.

Cloud IoT Core client library

The Cloud IoT Core client library was designed to enable Android Things developers to get started with just a few lines of code. The client library handles the networking, threading, and message handling, implementing best practices for authentication, security, error handling, and offline operation.

Cloud IoT Core maintains a device registry that keeps track of approved devices, and each device uses a public key to authenticate with the server. Android Things provides many features to support secure IoT applications, including a hardware-backed Android Keystore that ensures cryptographic key material is protected. The client library supports both RSA and ECC keys, and implements the generation of JSON Web Tokens (JWTs) for authentication with Cloud IoT Core.

Once the connection is established, devices can publish their telemetry data to one or more buckets in the telemetry topic, as well as report their internal state to a separate device state topic. The device state is intended to store information such as software versions or the number of working sensors. The telemetry messages are for all other data from the device, such as actual sensor measurements. Devices can also subscribe to configuration changes published from Cloud IoT Core.

Because IoT devices operate in the real world with poor wireless conditions, the client library provides extensive support for handling errors, and for caching and retransmitting events later. For developers requiring custom offline behavior, the library's queue is configurable and even replaceable. This provides detailed control over which events to save and the order in which they are sent when back online.

Device provisioning and authentication with Android Things

The Cloud IoT Core client library is part of our overall vision for device provisioning and authentication with Android Things. To learn more about this, watch the video of our presentation from Google I/O 2018:

Sample code

Getting started with the Cloud IoT Core client library is simple. You can simply add the following to the build.gradle file in your Android Things project:

implementation 'com.google.android.things:cloud-iot-core:1.0.0'

The library is also available as open source on GitHub if you prefer to build it yourself. We also have a sample that shows how to implement a sensor hub on Android Things, collecting sensor data from connected sensors and publishing them to a Google Cloud IoT Pub/Sub topic.

It is easy to start using the client library in your own code. The following Kotlin example demonstrates how to create a new configuration and client based on your project.

var configuration = IotCoreConfiguration.Builder().
                         .setProjectId("my-gcp-project")
                         .setRegistry("my-device-registry", "us-central1")
                         .setDeviceId("my-device-id")
                         .setKeyPair(keyPairObject)
                         .build()

var iotCoreClient = IotCoreClient.Builder()
              .setIotCoreConfiguration(configuration)
              .setOnConfigurationListener(onConfigurationListener)
              .setConnectionCallback(connectionCallback)
              .build()

iotCoreClient.connect()

Next, you can publish telemetry information or device state, using the following Kotlin examples.

private fun publishTelemetry(temperature: Float, humidity: Float) {
    // payload is an arbitrary, application-specific array of bytes
    val examplePayload = """{
        |"temperature" : $temperature,
        |"humidity": $humidity
        |}""".trimMargin().toByteArray()
    val event = TelemetryEvent(examplePayload, topicSubpath, TelemetryEvent.QOS_AT_LEAST_ONCE)
    iotCoreClient.publishTelemetry(event)
}

private fun publishDeviceState(telemetryFrequency: Int, enabledSensors: Array<String>) {
    // payload is an arbitrary, application-specific array of bytes
    val examplePayload = """{
        |"telemetryFrequency": $telemetryFrequency,
        |"enabledSensors": ${enabledSensors.contentToString()}
        |}""".trimMargin().toByteArray()
    iotCoreClient.publishDeviceState(examplePayload)
}

Additional resources

You can learn more about building for Android Things at the developer site. For more information about getting started with Cloud IoT Core, visit the information page and documentation. Finally, join Google's IoT Developers Community on Google+ to let us know what you're building with Android Things and Cloud IoT Core!

21 Jun 2018 9:13pm GMT

Better Biometrics in Android P

Posted by Vishwath Mohan, Security Engineer

To keep users safe, most apps and devices have an authentication mechanism, or a way to prove that you're you. These mechanisms fall into three categories: knowledge factors, possession factors, and biometric factors. Knowledge factors ask for something you know (like a PIN or a password), possession factors ask for something you have (like a token generator or security key), and biometric factors ask for something you are (like your fingerprint, iris, or face).

Biometric authentication mechanisms are becoming increasingly popular, and it's easy to see why. They're faster than typing a password, easier than carrying around a separate security key, and they prevent one of the most common pitfalls of knowledge-factor based authentication-the risk of shoulder surfing.

As more devices incorporate biometric authentication to safeguard people's private information, we're improving biometrics-based authentication in Android P by:

A better security model for biometrics

Currently, biometric unlocks quantify their performance today with two metrics borrowed from machine learning (ML): False Accept Rate (FAR), and False Reject Rate (FRR).

In the case of biometrics, FAR measures how often a biometric model accidentally classifies an incorrect input as belonging to the target user-that is, how often another user is falsely recognized as the legitimate device owner. Similarly, FRR measures how often a biometric model accidentally classifies the user's biometric as incorrect-that is, how often a legitimate device owner has to retry their authentication. The first is a security concern, while the second is problematic for usability.

Both metrics do a great job of measuring the accuracy and precision of a given ML (or biometric) model when applied to random input samples. However, because neither metric accounts for an active attacker as part of the threat model, they do not provide very useful information about its resilience against attacks.

In Android 8.1, we introduced two new metrics that more explicitly account for an attacker in the threat model: Spoof Accept Rate (SAR) and Imposter Accept Rate (IAR). As their names suggest, these metrics measure how easily an attacker can bypass a biometric authentication scheme. Spoofing refers to the use of a known-good recording (e.g. replaying a voice recording or using a face or fingerprint picture), while impostor acceptance means a successful mimicking of another user's biometric (e.g. trying to sound or look like a target user).

Strong vs. Weak Biometrics

We use the SAR/IAR metrics to categorize biometric authentication mechanisms as either strong or weak. Biometric authentication mechanisms with an SAR/IAR of 7% or lower are strong, and anything above 7% is weak. Why 7% specifically? Most fingerprint implementations have a SAR/IAR metric of about 7%, making this an appropriate standard to start with for other modalities as well. As biometric sensors and classification methods improve, this threshold can potentially be decreased in the future.

This binary classification is a slight oversimplification of the range of security that different implementations provide. However, it gives us a scalable mechanism (via the tiered authentication model) to appropriately scope the capabilities and the constraints of different biometric implementations across the ecosystem, based on the overall risk they pose.

While both strong and weak biometrics will be allowed to unlock a device, weak biometrics:

These measures are intended to allow weaker biometrics, while reducing the risk of unauthorized access.

BiometricPrompt API

Starting in Android P, developers can use the BiometricPrompt API to integrate biometric authentication into their apps in a device and biometric agnostic way. BiometricPrompt only exposes strong modalities, so developers can be assured of a consistent level of security across all devices their application runs on. A support library is also provided for devices running Android O and earlier, allowing applications to utilize the advantages of this API across more devices .

Here's a high-level architecture of BiometricPrompt.

The API is intended to be easy to use, allowing the platform to select an appropriate biometric to authenticate with instead of forcing app developers to implement this logic themselves. Here's an example of how a developer might use it in their app:

Conclusion

Biometrics have the potential to both simplify and strengthen how we authenticate our digital identity, but only if they are designed securely, measured accurately, and implemented in a privacy-preserving manner.

We want Android to get it right across all three. So we're combining secure design principles, a more attacker-aware measurement methodology, and a common, easy to use biometrics API that allows developers to integrate authentication in a simple, consistent, and safe manner.

Acknowledgements: This post was developed in joint collaboration with Jim Miller

21 Jun 2018 4:53pm GMT

08 Mar 2018

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Some terrible personal news

Cindy Cutts, my wife and best friend, passed away earlier this week. While I was traveling for work recently, Cindy went to visit her family in Omaha, Nebraska. On Sunday, while enjoying time with family, Cindy started having trouble breathing. Her family quickly called 911 and paramedics took Cindy to the hospital, but Cindy lost […]

08 Mar 2018 12:17am GMT

22 Jan 2018

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Talking to Mr. Money Mustache about the US Digital Service

Last week, I passed my one year anniversary as head of the US Digital Service (USDS). So when Mr. Money Mustache asked for an interview, I was delighted to talk about some of the work that the USDS does. If you aren't familiar with Mr. Money Mustache, he writes about a philosophy of badassity in […]

22 Jan 2018 6:58pm GMT

01 Apr 2017

feedGoogle Operating System

Google April Fools' Day 2017

April Fools' Day should probably be called Google Fools' Day, since there are so many Google hoaxes.

Google Japan developed a "bubble wrap" version of the Japanese keyboard. "The Google Japanese input bubble wrap version is a keyboard that realizes 'I want to press in my mind, I want to keep pressing'," according to Google Translate.



Another product for your smart home? Meet Google Gnome, "a voice-activated, hands-free tool designed to make backyard living effortless. Need to know what animal is squeaking in your bushes? Stay still and ask Gnome what sound an opossum makes. Running low on birdseed? That's where Gnome comes in. You can even use Gnome's proprietary high-intensity lasers to trim your hedges into whatever shape your heart desires."



The Chrome OS team brings the most popular mobile accessories to the Chromebook, which already blurs the line between mobile and desktop. Chromebook Groupie Stick, Chromebook Cardboard, Chromebook Workout Armband will soon be available in the Google Store. "To take advantage of beautiful, high-resolution displays, as well as great photo editing apps, we've carefully engineered the first Chromebook-sized selfie stick. Never again will you miss the perfect groupie."


Haptic Helpers make VR even more immersive. "We're taking VR to the next level with Haptic Helpers. Using a modest set of everyday tools, these VR virtuosos can simulate more than 10,000 unique experiences, all from the comfort of your own home. Smell the roses. Listen to the ocean. Feel a fluffy dog!"


You can now play the classic arcade game MS. PAC-MAN in Google Maps. "Avoid Blinky, Pinky, Inky, and Sue as you swerve the streets of real places around the world. But eat the pac-dots fast, because this game will only be around for a little while." Just go to the Google Maps site or open the Google Maps app for Android or iOS and click or tap MS. PAC-MAN at the bottom.


Google Cloud Platform expands to Mars. "By opening a dedicated extraterrestrial cloud region, we're bringing the power of Google's compute, network, and storage to the rest of the solar system, unlocking a plethora of possibilities for astronomy research, exploration of Martian natural resources and interplanetary life sciences. This region will also serve as an important node in an extensive network throughout the solar system. Our first interplanetary data center - affectionately nicknamed 'Ziggy Stardust' - will open in 2018," mentions Google.


Google Netherlands came up with Google Wind, a machine learning technology that controls the weather. "The Netherlands has many windmills, some no longer in use, we can connect to Google Cloud Platform. So we use the existing Dutch infrastructure, machine learning, weather patterns to control the network of windmills when rain is approaching. The first test results are very promising: we seem to be able to provide sun and clear skies for everyone in the Netherlands," mentions Google Netherlands blog.



Google's search app for iOS is now optimized for cats and dogs. "On the Google app for iOS, you can now use 3D Touch on the app icon or head to settings and select I'm Feeling Woof or I'm Feeling Meow to let your dogs and cats get info on topics they care about-whether that means squeaky toys or a bowl of milk!"


Google also launched Google Play for Pets, a new category of Android games designed for cats, dogs and other pets.


Google Translate's Word Lens feature supports a new language: Heptapod B, the alien language from the movie "Arrival". "The challenge with understanding Heptapod B is its nonlinear orthography. Fortunately, Google's neural machine translation system employs an encoder/decoder system that internally represents sentences as high-dimensional vectors. These vectors map well to the non-linear orthography of the Heptapod language and they are really the enabling technical factor in translating Heptapod B."

01 Apr 2017 7:25am GMT

19 Feb 2017

feedGoogle Operating System

Gmail Blocks JavaScript Attachments

If you try to send a JavaScript attachment using Gmail or if you want to download a .js attachment, you'll get a new anti-virus warning: "Blocked for security reasons", "1 attachment contains a virus or blocked file. Downloading this attachment is disabled".


.JS has been added to the long list of file types that are blocked by Gmail for security reasons. The full list: .ADE, .ADP, .BAT, .CHM, .CMD, .COM, .CPL, .EXE, .HTA, .INS, .ISP, .JAR, .JS (NEW), .JSE, .LIB, .LNK, .MDE, .MSC, .MSI, .MSP, .MST, .NSH .PIF, .SCR, .SCT, .SHB, .SYS, .VB, .VBE, .VBS, .VXD, .WSC, .WSF, .WSH. "To prevent against potential viruses, Gmail doesn't allow you to attach certain types of files, including: certain file types (listed above), including their compressed form (like .gz or .bz2 files) or when found within archives (like .zip or .tgz files), documents with malicious macros, archives whose listed file content is password protected, archives whose content includes a password protected archive."

The GSuite Blog informs that "for inbound mail, senders will get a bounce message explaining why the email was blocked. If you still need to send .js files for legitimate reasons, you can use Google Drive, Google Cloud Storage, or other storage solutions to share or send your files."

You can still send JavaScript files using Gmail if you change the extension. What about downloading old .js attachments? Try the workarounds from this post.

19 Feb 2017 10:39am GMT

25 Jan 2017

feedGoogle Operating System

Google Image Search Shows Colorful Suggestions

Google Image Search has a different way to display suggestions: it now shows a long list of colorful boxes with related searches. You can click one or more boxes to dynamically refine search results.


For example, when searching for [sportswear], Google shows suggestions like: [women basketball], [tennis], [badminton], [golf], [volleyball], [nike woman], [alexander wang], [adidas], [fashion], [performance], [vintage], [trendy], [urban], [school], [gym], [90's], [70's], [vogue], [luxe], [avant garde], [korean], [italian], [french] and more. It's interesting to notice that each category of suggestions has a different color.




Here's the old interface, which had fewer suggestions and displayed thumbnails next to suggestions:

25 Jan 2017 9:39pm GMT

19 Jan 2017

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Staying with the US Digital Service

A few months ago, I took a leave of absence from Google to do a stint with the US Digital Service. A lot of people know about the US Digital Service because they helped rescue the healthcare.gov website. But you might not realize that the US Digital Service has helped veterans get their health benefits, […]

19 Jan 2017 3:47am GMT

10 Nov 2011

feedAndroid Forums

Latest action game INC from OrangePixel now available!

From the developer of Meganoid and Stardash comes a new action arcade game: INC! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9j5OEG-3RyM Get it from the...

10 Nov 2011 9:31am GMT

Free online video chat

More than 1000 broadcast cameras for you online - the most incendiary models in Russia. 1000 girls, 1000, the temptations, 1000, full of desire - all...

10 Nov 2011 7:48am GMT

Layout problem

Hi Friends I decided to work with a tab layout application. Program consist of 3 tabs and a button. I like to place the button below the tab. ...

10 Nov 2011 5:20am GMT

26 Aug 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

The Emperor's Garden

The Emperor instructed the gardener to set up the new court's garden. "I want you to plant five trees growing the Crataan fruit," the Emperor said, "Because we asked people what fruit they like best, and most named the Crataan fruit!" The gardener replied, "Emperor, that is excellent thinking! But let me make some suggestions: First, how about we make one of the five trees bear the Muran fruit. Only one out of ten citizens loves it, but those peculiar citizens tend to love multiple times as much!" "Second," the gardener continued, "How about we make one of the five trees bear the Dratean fruit. No one loves it, but that's because no one knows it yet!" "Third," the gardener said, "How about we leave one spot in the garden empty. Who knows what new type of tree we'll discover that we can put there in the fut ...

26 Aug 2011 12:12pm GMT

15 Aug 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Color Sound Machine (and what else I've been doing lately)

For those of you who've been wondering whether I had turned to stone, fallen into a bottomless pit, or been climbing the Himalaya... no, none of that is true, even though you probably did notice I'm not actively blogging about Google here anymore*! Just now, a new iPad app I've been working on called Color Sound Machine went live, and this -- and all the other apps and games at Versus Pad** -- are actually what I am doing while not blogoscoping. *I've drafted unpublished posts explaining much more about past, present and future of Blogoscoped, and the history of Google news reporting, but ... oh, for now le ...

15 Aug 2011 4:00pm GMT

25 Feb 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Google drops reverse phone number lookup

One of the earliest specialist services provided by Google was reverse phone number lookup. If you used the "phonebook:" or "rphonebook:" operators together with a 10-digit US phone number, Google would show you the owner of that phone number, unless the number was unlisted. Google no longer provides that service. Not surprisingly, there was no press release marking the closure, but Google employee Daniel Russell has acknowledged the closure of the service in his blog. He hints at the possible pressures leading to the shuttering of the service: "As you can imagine, this was an endless source of hassles for people (who were surprised to see themselves searchable on Google) and for Google (who had to constantly de ...

25 Feb 2011 11:23am GMT