20 Apr 2014

feedPlanet Openmoko

Talpadk: Measuring printbed tempeartures on a RepRapPro Huxley

I have finally gotten around to measuring the surface temperature of my Huxley.

Temperature as function of set-point

Temperature as function of set-point

Method and instruments used

For measuring the temperature a Agilent U1233A with a U11186A (k type thermocouple) has used.

The ambient temperature has measured by waiting for the display to settle and the taking a readout.

The heat bed temperatures has measured on top of the aluminium print surface with the polyarmide tape left in place.
The thermocouple was held in place by another piece of polyarmide tape.

The thermocouple was left on the print bed for 1 minute for the temperature to stabilize, the temperature was then measured on the multimeter using the "avg" function after a 2 minute sampling period.

Measurements

The temperatures were measured at the centre and approximately 1cm from the edge.
The center temperature was measured an additional time at the end of the measurement cycle.
The print bed was in its forward position with the print head to the left at the end stop (cooling fan running)

The ambient temperature was measured as 22.1C at start of the surface scan, and 24.4C at the end.
The heat bed has maintained at 85C using the 3d printer firmware.

NA 71.2C 75.8C
77.6C 71.1C
76.1C
75.2C
75.6C 77.1C 72.8C

After this the thermocouple was reapplied using a fresh piece of polyarmide tape at the centre of the print bed and left there.
The print bed set point was then reduced and the surface temperature measured.

Set point [C] Measured [C] Percentage
85 76.2 90
70 63.1 90
55 50.2 91
40 37.8 95

Notes

Some of the variances in the measurements across the bed might be related probe mounting relative to the surface and cooling to ambient.
Using a piece of foam or another insulator might improve this.
The lower measurement points may simply be caused by a bad thermal contact to the print bed.
Heat sink compound could perhaps have alliviated some of this as well (and made a lot of mess).

Also even though the measurements was taken as a 2 minute average, the temperature swings of the heat bed regulation may have contributed with some noise.

Also a thermal camera would have made this much easier and quicker, too bad they are so expensive.
(And that Fluke VT02/VT04 visual thermometers has such a bad resolution)

Conclusion

I would consider the bed temperature constant across the print bed within the uncertainty of my measurements.

At "higher" temperatures the surface temperature seems to be roughly 90% of the set point.


20 Apr 2014 4:14pm GMT

23 Mar 2014

feedPlanet Openmoko

Talpadk: A fast and beautiful terminal

xrvt-unicode/uxrvt has long been my favourite terminal, it is fast and it supports faked transparency.

rxvt terminal with transparencyOne problem with using a darkened background was however that some terminal colour simply were bit too dark.

After a quick googling and short man page reading it was however clear that this can actually easily be resolved.
Additionally I can store some extra settings making my keyboard short cur for launching the terminal nice and simple.

Requirements:

sudo apt-get install xrvt-unicode 
sudo apt-get install tango-icon-theme

The last line is only for getting the terminal icon, and is optional if you comment out the iconFile resource

Configuring rxvt-unicode

In the file ~/.Xdefaults add the following lines:

!===== rxvt-unicode resource definitions =====!
!The number of scrollback lines
URxvt*saveLine: 5000

!Add fading for unfocused windows
URxvt*fading: 33

!Specify the icon for the terminal window, requieres the "tango-icon-theme" package
URxvt*iconFile: /usr/share/icons/Tango/16x16/apps/terminal.png

!Transparency setting
URxvt*transparent: true
URxvt*shading: 25
URxvt*background: Black
URxvt*foreground: White

!Colour setup for the darker background
URxvt*color0:  Black
URxvt*color1:  #ffa2a2
URxvt*color2:  #afffa2
URxvt*color3:  #feffa2
URxvt*color4:  #a2d0ff
URxvt*color5:  #a2a2ff
URxvt*color6:  #a2f5ff
URxvt*color7:  #ffffff
URxvt*color8:  #000000
URxvt*color9:  #ffa2a2
URxvt*color10: #afffa2
URxvt*color11: #feffa2
URxvt*color12: #a2d0ff
URxvt*color13: #a2a2ff
URxvt*color14: #a2f5ff
URxvt*color15: White

!Colour notes from the man page
!color0       (black)            = Black
!color1       (red)              = Red3
!color2       (green)            = Green3
!color3       (yellow)           = Yellow3
!color4       (blue)             = Blue3
!color5       (magenta)          = Magenta3
!color6       (cyan)             = Cyan3
!color7       (white)            = AntiqueWhite
!color8       (bright black)     = Grey25
!color9       (bright red)       = Red
!color10      (bright green)     = Green
!color11      (bright yellow)    = Yellow
!color12      (bright blue)      = Blue
!color13      (bright magenta)   = Magenta
!color14      (bright cyan)      = Cyan
!color15      (bright white)     = White

The last comments can of course be left out but is handy if you need to find a particular colour that you want to change.

Also adjust the shading resource to your liking.

After saving the file you may start the terminal using urxvt or rxvt-unicode and enjoy it fast and good looks.


23 Mar 2014 6:01pm GMT

01 Mar 2014

feedPlanet Openmoko

John Sullivan: Spritz

Spritz seems like a very interesting way to read quickly. It's the opposite of everything I've read (slowly) about speed reading, which focuses on using peripheral vision and not reading word-by-word. You're supposed to do things like move your eyes straight down the page, taking in whole lines at a time.

Interruptions seem like a big problem; interruptions that make me look away, or interruptions in my brain, where I might realize I've not been paying attention for some amount of time. Maybe they should have navigation buttons similar to video players, so you can skip backward 15 seconds at a time. I also do want to go back and review previous pages sometimes for reasons that have nothing to do with interruption, so I wouldn't want word-by-word to be the only way to view a text -- especially when reading nonfiction. I might event want it to work in a mode where you hold down the button on the side of your phone or tablet in order to move the words, and then have them automatically pause when you release. It feels like I'd want a lot of short breaks when reading in this style.

It should also be free software, but unfortunately I'm guessing it won't be. I hope someone will make a free software application along these lines -- the basics seem pretty basic.

01 Mar 2014 5:36pm GMT