21 May 2016

feedPlanet Openmoko

Harald "LaF0rge" Welte: Slovenian student sentenced for detecting TETRA flaws using OsmocomTETRA

According to some news report, including this report at softpedia, a 26 year old student at the Faculty of Criminal Justice and Security in Maribor, Slovenia has received a suspended prison sentence for finding flaws in Slovenian police and army TETRA network using OsmocomTETRA

As the Osmocom project leader and main author of OsmocomTETRA, this is highly disturbing news to me. OsmocomTETRA was precisely developed to enable people to perform research and analysis in TETRA networks, and to audit their safe and secure configuration.

If a TETRA network (like any other network) is configured with broken security, then the people responsible for configuring and operating that network are to be blamed, and not the researcher who invests his personal time and effort into demonstrating that police radio communications safety is broken. On the outside, the court sentence really sounds like "shoot the messenger". They should instead have jailed the people responsible for deploying such an insecure network in the first place, as well as those responsible for not doing the most basic air-interface interception tests before putting such a network into production.

According to all reports, the student had shared the results of his research with the authorities and there are public detailed reports from 2015, like the report (in Slovenian) at https://podcrto.si/vdor-v-komunikacijo-policije-razkril-hude-varnostne-ranljivosti-sistema-tetra/.

The statement that he should have asked the authorities for permission before starting his research is moot. I've seen many such cases and you would normally never get permission to do this, or you would most likely get no response from the (in)competent authorities in the first place.

From my point of view, they should give the student a medal of honor, instead of sentencing him. He has provided a significant service to the security of the public sector communications in his country.

To be fair, the news report also indicates that there were other charges involved, like impersonating a police officer. I can of course not comment on those.

Please note that I do not know the student or his research first-hand, nor did I know any of his actions or was involved in them. OsmocomTETRA is a Free / Open Source Software project available to anyone in source code form. It is a vital tool in demonstrating the lack of security in many TETRA networks, whether networks for public safety or private networks.

21 May 2016 10:00pm GMT

07 May 2016

feedPlanet Openmoko

Holger "zecke" Freyther: C++, Qt and Treefrog to build user facing web applications

In the past I have written about my usage of Tufao and Qt to build REST services. This time I am writing about my experience of using the TreeFrog framework to build a full web application.

You might wonder why one would want to build such a thing in a statically and compiled language instead of something more dynamic. There are a few reasons for it:

  • Performance: The application is intended to run on our sysmoBTS GSM Basestation (TI Davinci DM644x). By modern standards it is a very low-end SoC (ARMv5te instruction set, single core, etc, low amount of RAM) and at the same time still perfectly fine to run a GSM network.
  • Interface: For GSM we have various libraries with a C programming interface and they are easy to consume from C++.
  • Compilation/Distribution: By (cross-)building the application there is a "single" executable and we don't have the dependency mess of Ruby.
The second decision was to not use Tufao and search for a framework that has user management and a template/rendering/canvas engine built-in. At the Chaos Computer Camp in 2007 I remember to have heard a conversation of "Qt" for the Web (Wt, C++ Web Toolkit) and this was the first framework I looked at. It seems like a fine project/product but interfacing with Qt seemed like an after thought. I continued to look and ended up finding and trying the TreeFrog framework.

I am really surprised how long this project exists without having heard about it. It is using/built on top of Qt, uses QtSQL for the ORM mapping, QMetaObject for dispatching to controllers and the template engine and resembles Ruby on Rails a lot. It has two template engines, routing of URLs to controllers/slots, one can embed any C++ in the template. The documentation is complete and by using the search on the website I found everything I was searching for my "advanced" topics. Because of my own stupidity I ended up single stepping through the code and a Qt coder should feel right at home.

My favorite features:
  • tspawn model TableName will autogenerate (and update) a C++ model based on the table in the database. The updating is working as well.
  • The application builds a libmodel.so, libhelper.so (I removed that) and libcontroller.so. When using the -r option of the application the application will respawn itself. At first I thought I would not like it but it improves round trip times.
  • C++ in the template. The ERB template is parsed and a C++ class will be generated and the ::toString() method will generate the HTML code. So in case something is going wrong, it is very easy to inspect.

If you are currently using Ruby on Rails, Django but would like to do it with C++, have a look at TreeFrog. I really like it so far.

07 May 2016 8:11pm GMT

01 May 2016

feedPlanet Openmoko

Harald "LaF0rge" Welte: Developers wanted for Osmocom GSM related work

Right now I'm feeling sad. I really shouldn't, but I still do.

Many years ago I started OpenBSC and Osmocom in order to bring Free Software into an area where it barely existed before: Cellular Infrastructure. For the first few years, it was "just for fun", without any professional users. A FOSS project by enthusiasts. Then we got some commercial / professional users, and with them funding, paying for e.g. Holger and my freelance work. Still, implementing all protocol stacks, interfaces and functional elements of GSM and GPRS from the radio network to the core network is something that large corporations typically spend hundreds of man-years on. So funding for Osmocom GSM implementations was always short, and we always tried to make the best out of it.

After Holger and I started sysmocom in 2011, we had a chance to use funds from BTS sales to hire more developers, and we were growing our team of developers. We finally could pay some developers other than ourselves from working on Free Software cellular network infrastructure.

In 2014 and 2015, sysmocom got side-tracked with some projects where Osmocom and the cellular network was only one small part of a much larger scope. In Q4/2015 and in 2016, we are back on track with focussing 100% at Osmocom projects, which you can probably see by a lot more associated commits to the respective project repositories.

By now, we are in the lucky situation that the work we've done in the Osmocom project on providing Free Software implementations of cellular technologies like GSM, GPRS, EDGE and now also UMTS is receiving a lot of attention. This attention translates into companies approaching us (particularly at sysmocom) regarding funding for implementing new features, fixing existing bugs and short-comings, etc. As part of that, we can even work on much needed infrastructural changes in the software.

So now we are in the opposite situation: There's a lot of interest in funding Osmocom work, but there are few people in the Osmocom community interested and/or capable to follow-up to that. Some of the early contributors have moved into other areas, and are now working on proprietary cellular stacks at large multi-national corporations. Some others think of GSM as a fun hobby and want to keep it that way.

At sysmocom, we are trying hard to do what we can to keep up with the demand. We've been looking to add people to our staff, but right now we are struggling only to compensate for the regular fluctuation of employees (i.e. keep the team size as is), let alone actually adding new members to our team to help to move free software cellular networks ahead.

I am struggling to understand why that is. I think Free Software in cellular communications is one of the most interesting and challenging frontiers for Free Software to work on. And there are many FOSS developers who love nothing more than to conquer new areas of technology.

At sysmocom, we can now offer what would have been my personal dream job for many years:

  • paid work on Free Software that is available to the general public, rather than something only of value to the employer
  • interesting technical challenges in an area of technology where you will not find the answer to all your problems on stackoverflow or the like
  • work in a small company consisting almost entirely only of die-hard engineers, without corporate managers, marketing departments, etc.
  • work in an environment free of Microsoft and Apple software or cloud services; use exclusively Free Software to get your work done

I would hope that more developers would appreciate such an environment. If you're interested in helping FOSS cellular networks ahead, feel free to have a look at http://sysmocom.de/jobs or contact us at jobs@sysmocom.de. Together, we can try to move Free Software for mobile communications to the next level!

01 May 2016 10:00pm GMT