23 Mar 2014

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Talpadk: A fast and beautiful terminal

xrvt-unicode/uxrvt has long been my favourite terminal, it is fast and it supports faked transparency.

rxvt terminal with transparencyOne problem with using a darkened background was however that some terminal colour simply were bit too dark.

After a quick googling and short man page reading it was however clear that this can actually easily be resolved.
Additionally I can store some extra settings making my keyboard short cur for launching the terminal nice and simple.

Requirements:

sudo apt-get install xrvt-unicode 
sudo apt-get install tango-icon-theme

The last line is only for getting the terminal icon, and is optional if you comment out the iconFile resource

Configuring rxvt-unicode

In the file ~/.Xdefaults add the following lines:

!===== rxvt-unicode resource definitions =====!
!The number of scrollback lines
URxvt*saveLine: 5000

!Add fading for unfocused windows
URxvt*fading: 33

!Specify the icon for the terminal window, requieres the "tango-icon-theme" package
URxvt*iconFile: /usr/share/icons/Tango/16x16/apps/terminal.png

!Transparency setting
URxvt*transparent: true
URxvt*shading: 25
URxvt*background: Black
URxvt*foreground: White

!Colour setup for the darker background
URxvt*color0:  Black
URxvt*color1:  #ffa2a2
URxvt*color2:  #afffa2
URxvt*color3:  #feffa2
URxvt*color4:  #a2d0ff
URxvt*color5:  #a2a2ff
URxvt*color6:  #a2f5ff
URxvt*color7:  #ffffff
URxvt*color8:  #000000
URxvt*color9:  #ffa2a2
URxvt*color10: #afffa2
URxvt*color11: #feffa2
URxvt*color12: #a2d0ff
URxvt*color13: #a2a2ff
URxvt*color14: #a2f5ff
URxvt*color15: White

!Colour notes from the man page
!color0       (black)            = Black
!color1       (red)              = Red3
!color2       (green)            = Green3
!color3       (yellow)           = Yellow3
!color4       (blue)             = Blue3
!color5       (magenta)          = Magenta3
!color6       (cyan)             = Cyan3
!color7       (white)            = AntiqueWhite
!color8       (bright black)     = Grey25
!color9       (bright red)       = Red
!color10      (bright green)     = Green
!color11      (bright yellow)    = Yellow
!color12      (bright blue)      = Blue
!color13      (bright magenta)   = Magenta
!color14      (bright cyan)      = Cyan
!color15      (bright white)     = White

The last comments can of course be left out but is handy if you need to find a particular colour that you want to change.

Also adjust the shading resource to your liking.

After saving the file you may start the terminal using urxvt or rxvt-unicode and enjoy it fast and good looks.


23 Mar 2014 6:01pm GMT

01 Mar 2014

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John Sullivan: Spritz

Spritz seems like a very interesting way to read quickly. It's the opposite of everything I've read (slowly) about speed reading, which focuses on using peripheral vision and not reading word-by-word. You're supposed to do things like move your eyes straight down the page, taking in whole lines at a time.

Interruptions seem like a big problem; interruptions that make me look away, or interruptions in my brain, where I might realize I've not been paying attention for some amount of time. Maybe they should have navigation buttons similar to video players, so you can skip backward 15 seconds at a time. I also do want to go back and review previous pages sometimes for reasons that have nothing to do with interruption, so I wouldn't want word-by-word to be the only way to view a text -- especially when reading nonfiction. I might event want it to work in a mode where you hold down the button on the side of your phone or tablet in order to move the words, and then have them automatically pause when you release. It feels like I'd want a lot of short breaks when reading in this style.

It should also be free software, but unfortunately I'm guessing it won't be. I hope someone will make a free software application along these lines -- the basics seem pretty basic.

01 Mar 2014 5:36pm GMT

21 Feb 2014

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Talpadk: Antialiased openscad rendering

OpenSCAD rendering

Std. 512x512 OpenSCAD rendering

Std. 512×512 OpenSCAD rendering

Recent versions of OpenSCAD is capable of rendering objects/assemblies to images.
To the right there is an example of the default 512×512 image quality produced by the command:

openscad -o render.png assembly.scad

Below it is an anti-aliased version of the same scad file.
I used the common trick of generating an oversized image and downscaling it.
It was created with the following two commands:

openscad -o render.png  --imgsize=2048,2048 assembly.scad
convert render.png -resize 512x512 render.png

If you update your project renderings using a makefile/script I don't consider it much of a hassle considering the improvement in image quality.
Also at least on my laptop with the currently relativity simple scad file rendering is still fast.

2048x2048 OpenSCAD render downscaled to 512x512

2048×2048 OpenSCAD render downscaled to 512×512

In case you are wondering the assembly is a new CNC mill I'm designing.
Which hopefully is an improvement over the last design.

The old design is available HERE
The new design is being created HERE

Unlike the old design the new one is being pre-assembled in openscad, hopefully preventing having to print parts that only fitted together in my head, saving both time and plastic.

Both designs are hosted on Cubehero, my favourite site for sharing designs on.
It comes with build in version control though git (it also has a web interface for "kittens")
Wil that runs the site is a friendly and helpful guy, and it is not bogged down with stupid End User License Agreements like another site…
I highly recommend it…


21 Feb 2014 10:51am GMT