15 Nov 2015

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Harald "LaF0rge" Welte: No GSM test network at 32C3

I currently don't assume that there will be a GSM network at the 32C3.

Ever since OpenBSC was created in 2008, the annual CCC congress was a great opportunity to test OpenBSC and related software with thousands of willing participants. In order to do so, we obtained a test licence from the German regulatory authority. This was never any problem, as there was a chunk of spectrum in the 1800 MHz GSM band that was not allocated to any commercial operator, the so-called DECT guard band. It's called that way as it was kept free in order to ensure there is no interference between 1800 MHz GSM and the neighboring DECT cordless telephones.

Over the decades, it was determined on a EU level that this guard band might not be necessary, or at least not if certain considerations are taken for BTSs deployed in that band.

When the German regulatory authority re-auctioned the GSM spectrum earlier this year, they decided to also auction the frequencies of the former DECT guard band. The DECT guard band was awarded to Vodafone.

This is a pity, as this means that people involved with cellular research or development of cellular technology now have it significantly harder to actually test their systems.

In some other EU member states it is easier, like in the Netherlands or the UK, where the DECT guard band was not treated like any other chunk of the GSM bands, but put under special rules. Not so in Germany.

To make a long story short: Without the explicit permission of any of the commercial mobile operators, it is not possible to run a test/experimental network like we used to ran at the annual CCC congress.

Given that

  • the event is held in the city center (where frequencies are typically used and re-used quite densely), and
  • an operator has nothing to gain from permitting us to test our open source GSM/GPRS implementations,

I think there is little chance that this will become a reality.

If anyone has really good contacts to the radio network planning team of a German mobile operator and wants to prove me wrong: Feel free to contact me by e-mail.

Thanks to everyone involved with the GSM team at the CCC events, particularly Holger Freyther, Daniel Willmann, Stefan Schmidt, Jan Luebbe, Peter Stuge, Sylvain Munaut, Kevin Redon, Andreas Eversberg, Ulli (and everyone else whom I may have forgot, my apologies). It's been a pleasure!

Thanks also to our friends at the POC (Phone Operation Center) who have provided interfacing to the DECT, ISDN, analog and VoIP network at the events. Thanks to roh for helping with our special patch requests. Thanks also to those entities and people who borrowed equipment (like BTSs) in the pre-sysmocom years.

So long, and thanks for all the fish!

15 Nov 2015 11:00pm GMT

Harald "LaF0rge" Welte: GSM test network at 32C3, after all

Contrary to my blog post yesterday, it looks like we will have a private GSM network at the CCC congress again, after all.

It appears that Vodafone Germany (who was awarded the former DECT guard band in the 2015 spectrum auctions) is not yet using it in December, and they agreed that we can use it at the 32C3.

With this approval from Vodafone Germany we can now go to the regulator (BNetzA) and obtain the usual test license. Given that we used to get the license in the past, and that Vodafone has agreed, this should be a mere formality.

For the German language readers who appreciate the language of the administration, it will be a Frequenzzuteilung für Versuchszwecke im nichtöffentlichen mobilen Landfunk.

So thanks to Vodafone Germany, who enabled us at least this time to run a network again. By end of 2016 you can be sure they will have put their new spectrum to use, so I'm not that optimistic that this would be possible again.

15 Nov 2015 11:00pm GMT

Harald "LaF0rge" Welte: Deutsche Bank / unstable interfaces

Deutsche Bank is a large, international bank. They offer services world-wide and are undoubtedly proud of their massive corporate IT department.

Yet, at the same time, they fail to get the most fundamental principles of user/customer-visible interfaces wrong: Don't change them. If you need to change them, manage the change carefully.

In many software projects, keeping the API or other interface stable is paramount. Think of the Linux kernel, where breaking a userspace-visible interface is not permitted. The reasons are simple: If you break that interface, _everyone_ using that interface will need to change their implementation, and will have to synchronize that with the change on the other side of the interface.

The internet online banking system of Deutsche Bank in Germany permits the upload of transactions by their customers in a CSV file format.

And guess what? They change the file format from one day to the other.

  • without informing their users in advance, giving them time to adopt their implementations of that interface
  • without documenting the exact nature of the change
  • adding new fields to the CSV in the middle of the line, rather than at the end of the line, to make sure things break even more

Now if you're running a business and depend on automatizing your payments using the interface provided by Deutsche Bank, this means that you fail to pay your suppliers in time, you hastily drop/delay other (paid!) work that you have to do in order to try to figure out what exactly Deutsche Bank decided to change completely unannounced, from one day to the other.

If at all, I would have expected this from a hobbyist kind of project. But seriously, from one of the worlds' leading banks? An interface that is probably used by thousands and thousands of users? WTF?!?

15 Nov 2015 11:00pm GMT