13 Jan 2019

feedPlanet KDE

Facebook AccountKit with Qt/C++ on Android

Facebook's AccountKit is an authentication service that can use your email or phone number to login to your services, it doesn't require that the user has a Facebook account, just a valid email or phone.

The cool thing about it is that it sends SMS for free, and although sending SMSs is cheap being free of charge is something you might want to look when creating a new App, in fact here in Brazil some big Apps do make use of it.

So long story short story I wanted to add this to my Qt Android App.

Thanks to the great help of Kai Uwe Broulik who had give some tips on the past on how to call Java code I started with this same approach:

And… it did work BUT I was unable to get the result, this is because the Java code starts a new Activity and returns the result on a method that must be implemented on the code that Qt creates for starting your activity, so this means I'd need to change the XML manifest to call my subclass instead of what Qt provides, and would need to do a bunch of other stuff myself, basically would get more maintainance work to do.

So another option would be to do all of this from C++, which Kai said it would be better at first, but doing a bunch of JNI scared me a bit, also I hadn't found the reference page to their API (which he found after the work was done lol). There's a tool called javap that can dump the Java signature of what is inside the package you got, so with the help of this we went on porting all the calls to AccountKit API to C++/Qt, this way we can call QtAndroid::startActivity() passing a pointer to a class that will handle the result of the new Activity, all in C++ .

There were some initial issues with the Enums used (aparently some new Java7 stuff), but the code now doesn't require a single line of Java code, which is great when integrating in Qt Android Apps.

The result is on GitHub, so if you need this just copy the integration class, it has IFDEFs so if you are testing on !Android it will compile fine. (You still need to follow the Gradle and manifest integration that's on their dev site), feel free to make PR for fixes and features

https://github.com/ceciletti/third-party-qt-utils

13 Jan 2019 3:06pm GMT

This week in Usability & Productivity, part 53

I totally missed that last week marked the one-year anniversary of my documentation and guidance of KDE's Usability & Productivity initiative. I think we've achieved a lot over the course of that year!

Note that this is NOT an exhaustive log of everything that happened this week in the entire KDE community, or even in all of Plasma. The actual number of commits and improvements is always vast and enormous-too much to comprehend, really. The KDE Community is staggeringly productive.

Rather, this is always a curated list of only the user-facing improvements I believe are directly relevant to the Usability & Productivity initiative. And speaking of it, this week we got an interesting assortment of new features, bugfixes, and UI improvements-many of which I didn't mention but will ultimately be appreciated when taken together. Check it out:

New Features

Bugfixes & Performance Improvements

User Interface Improvements

Next week, your name could be in this list! Not sure how? Just ask! I've helped mentor a number of new contributors recently and I'd love to help you, too! You can also check out https://community.kde.org/Get_Involved, and find out how you can help be a part of something that really matters. You don't have to already be a programmer. I wasn't when I got started. Try it, you'll like it! We don't bite!

If my efforts to perform, guide, and document this work seem useful and you'd like to see more of them, then consider becoming a patron on Patreon, LiberaPay, or PayPal. Also consider making a donation to the KDE e.V. foundation.

13 Jan 2019 7:01am GMT

12 Jan 2019

feedPlanet KDE

Nanonote 1.0.1

The first release of Nanonote, my minimalist note-taking app, was a bit rushed: I broke indentation shortly before tagging version 1.0.0... meh.

So here is version 1.0.1. It fixes the indentation and adds the ability to indent or unindent whole lines with Tab and Shift+Tab, in addition to the existing Ctrl+I and Ctrl+U shortcuts.

In addition to these changes, the build system can now generate Debian and RPM packages, making the application easier to install.

These packages are generated by CPack inside an Ubuntu 18.04 Docker. This means they work on my machine, but do not have the same level of quality as packages crafted by real packagers. I am especially looking for feedback regarding the RPM packages, which I haven't tested.

You can find them on the project release page.

There aren't any other end-user changes in this release but I worked on infrastructure a bit: I added unit tests and set up Travis CI for continuous integration. I am probably going to write an article about this next. In the mean time, enjoy Nanonote 1.0.1!

12 Jan 2019 5:37pm GMT

07 Jan 2019

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Tomeu Visozo: A Panfrost milestone

The video

Below you can see glmark2 running as a Wayland client in Weston, on a NanoPC -T4 (so a RK3399 SoC with a Mali T-864 GPU)). It's much smoother than on the video, which is limited to 5FPS by the webcam.


Weston is running with the DRM backend and the GL renderer.

The history behind it


For more than 10 years, at Collabora we have been happily helping our customers to make the most of their hardware by running free software.

One area some of us have specially enjoyed working on has been open drivers for GPUs, which for a long time have been considered the next frontier in the quest to have a full software platform that companies and individuals can understand, improve and fix without having to ask for permission first.

Something that has saddened me a bit has been our reduced ability to help those customers that for one reason or another had chosen a hardware platform with ARM Mali GPUs, as no open driver was available for those.

While our biggest customers were able to get a high level of support from the vendors in order to have the Mali graphics stack well integrated with the rest of their product, the smaller ones had a much harder time in achieving that level of integration, which manifested in reduced performance, increased power consumption and slipped milestones.

That's why we have been following with great interest the several efforts that aimed to come up with an open driver for GPUs in the Mali family, one similar to those already existing for Qualcomm, NVIDIA and Vivante.

At XDC last year we had the chance of meeting the people involved in the latest effort to develop such a driver: Panfrost. And in the months that followed I made some room in my backlog to come up with a plan to give the effort a boost.

At that point, Panfrost was only able to get its bits in the screen by an elaborate hack that involved copying each frame into a X11 SHM buffer, which besides making the setup of the development environment much more cumbersome, invalidated any performance analysis. It also limited testing to demos such as glmark2.

Due to my previous work on Etnaviv I was already familiar with the abstractions in Mesa for setups in which the display of buffers is performed by a device different from the GPU so it was just a matter of seeing how we could get the kernel driver for the Mali GPU to play well with the rest of the stack.

So during the past month or so I have come up with a proper implementation of the winsys abstraction that makes use of ARM's kernel driver. The result is that now developers have a better base on which to work on the rendering side of things.

By properly creating, exporting and importing buffers, we can now run applications on GBM, from demos such as kmscube and glmark2 to compositors such as Weston, but also big applications such as Kodi. We are also supporting zero-copy display of GPU-rendered clients in Weston.

This should make it much easier to work on the rendering side of things, and work on a proper DRM driver in the mainline kernel can proceed in parallel.

For those interested in joining to the effort, Alyssa has graciously taken the time to update the instructions to build and test Panfrost. You can join us at #panfrost in Freenode and can start sending merge requests to Gitlab.

Thanks to Collabora for sponsoring this work and to Alyssa Rosenzweig and Lyude Paul for their previous work and for answering my questions.

07 Jan 2019 11:54am GMT

15 Dec 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Peter Hutterer: Understanding HID report descriptors

This time we're digging into HID - Human Interface Devices and more specifically the protocol your mouse, touchpad, joystick, keyboard, etc. use to talk to your computer.

Remember the good old days where you had to install a custom driver for every input device? Remember when PS/2 (the protocol) had to be extended to accommodate for mouse wheels, and then again for five button mice. And you had to select the right protocol to make it work. Yeah, me neither, I tend to suppress those memories because the world is awful enough as it is.

As users we generally like devices to work out of the box. Hardware manufacturers generally like to add bits and bobs because otherwise who would buy that new device when last year's device looks identical. This difference in needs can only be solved by one superhero: Committee-man, with the superpower to survive endless meetings and get RFCs approved.

Many many moons ago, when USB itself was in its infancy, Committee man and his sidekick Caffeine boy got the USB consortium agree on a standard for input devices that is so self-descriptive that operating systems (Win95!) can write one driver that can handle this year's device, and next year's, and so on. No need to install extra drivers, your device will just work out of the box. And so HID was born. This may only be an approximate summary of history.

Originally HID was designed to work over USB. But just like Shrek the technology world is obsessed with layers so these days HID works over different transport layers. HID over USB is what your mouse uses, HID over i2c may be what your touchpad uses. HID works over Bluetooth and it's celebrity-diet version BLE. Somewhere, someone out there is very slowly moving a mouse pointer by sending HID over carrier pigeons just to prove a point. Because there's always that one guy.

HID is incredibly simple in that the static description of the device can just be bytes burnt into the ROM like the Australian sun into unprepared English backpackers. And the event frames are often an identical series of bytes where every bit is filled in by the firmware according to the axis/buttons/etc.

HID is incredibly complicated because parsing it is a stack-based mental overload. Each individual protocol item is simple but getting it right and all into your head is tricky. Luckily, I'm here for you to make this simpler to understand or, failing that, at least more entertaining.

As said above, the purpose of HID is to make devices describe themselves in a generic manner so that you can have a single driver handle any input device. The idea is that the host parses that standard protocol and knows exactly how the device will behave. This has worked out great, we only have around 200 files dealing with vendor- and hardware-specific HID quirks as of v4.20.

HID messages are Reports. And to know what a Report means and how to interpret it, you need a Report Descriptor. That Report Descriptor is static and contains a series of bytes detailing "what" and "where", i.e. what a sequence of bits represents and where to find those bits in the Report. So let's try and parse one of Report Descriptors, let's say for a fictional mouse with a few buttons. How exciting, we're at the forefront of innovation here.

The Report Descriptor consists of a bunch of Items. A parser reads the next Item, processes the information within and moves on. Items are small (1 byte header, 0-4 bytes payload) and generally only apply exactly one tiny little bit of information. You need to accumulate several items to build up enough information to actually know what's happening.

The "what" question of the Report Descriptor is answered with the so-called Usage. This could be something simple like X or Y (0x30 and 0x31) or something more esoteric like System Menu Exit (0x88). A Usage is 16 bits but all Usages are grouped into so-called Usage Pages. A Usage Page too is a 16 bit value and together they form the 32-bit value that tells us what the device can do. Examples:


0001 0031 # Generic Desktop, Y
0001 0088 # Generic Desktop, System Menu Exit
0003 0005 # VR Controls, Head Tracker
0003 0006 # VR Controls, Head Mounted Display
0004 0031 # Keyboard, Keyboard \ and |

Note how the Usage in the last item is the same as the first one, without the Usage Page you will mix things up. It helps if you always think of as the Usage as a 32-bit number. For your kids' bed-time story time, here are the HID Usage Tables from 2004 and the approved HID Usage Table Review Requests of the last decade. Because nothing puts them to sleep quicker than droning on about hex numbers associated with remote control buttons.

To successfully interpret a Report from the device, you need to know which bits have which Usage associated with them. So let's go back to our innovative mouse. We would want a report descriptor with 6 items like this:


Usage Page (Generic Desktop)
Usage (X)
Report Size (16)
Usage Page (Generic Desktop)
Usage (Y)
Report Size (16)

This basically tells the host: X and Y both have 16 bits. So if we get a 4-byte Report from the device, we know two bytes are for X, two for Y.

HID was invented when a time when bits were more expensive than printer ink, so we can't afford to waste any bits (still the case because who would want to spend an extra penny on more ROM). HID makes use of so-called Global items, once those are set their value applies to all following items until changed. Usage Page and Report Size are such Global items, so the above report descriptor is really implemented like this:


Usage Page (Generic Desktop)
Usage (X)
Usage (Y)
Report Count (2)
Report Size (16)
Input (Data,Var,Rel)

The Report Count just tells us that 2 fields of the current Report Size are coming up. We have two usages, two fields, and 16 bits each so we know what to do. The Input item is sort-of the marker for the end of the stack, it basically tells us "process what you've seen so far", together with a few flags. Rel in this case means that the Usages are relative. Oh, and Input means that this is data from device to host. Output would be data from host to device, e.g. to set LEDs on a keyboard. There's also Feature which indicates configurable items.

Buttons on a device are generally just numbered so it'd be monumental 16-bits-at-a-time waste to have HID send Usage (Button1), Usage (Button2), etc. for every button on the device. HID instead provides a Usage Minimum and Usage Maximumto sequentially order them. This looks like this:


Usage Page (Button)
Usage Minimum (1)
Usage Maximum (5)
Report Count (5)
Report Size (1)
Input (Data,Var,Abs)

So we have 5 buttons here and each button has one bit. Note how the buttons are Abs because a button state is not a relative value, it's either down or up. HID is quite intolerant to Schrödinger's thought experiments.

Let's put the two things together and we have an almost-correct Report descriptor:


Usage Page (Button)
Usage Minimum (1)
Usage Maximum (5)
Report Count (5)
Report Size (1)
Input (Data,Var,Abs)

Report Size (3)
Report Count (1)
Input (Cnst,Arr,Abs)

Usage Page (Generic Desktop)
Usage (X)
Usage (Y)
Report Count (2)
Report Size (16)
Input (Data,Var,Rel)

New here is Cnst. This signals that the bits have a constant value, thus don't need a Usage and basically don't matter (haha. yeah, right. in theory). Linux does indeed ignore those. Cnst is used for padding to align on byte boundaries - 5 bits for buttons plus 3 bits padding make 8 bits. Which makes one byte as everyone agrees except for granddad over there in the corner. I don't know how he got in.

Were we to get a 5-byte Report from the device, we'd parse it approximately like this:


button_state = byte[0] & 0x1f
x = bytes[1] | (byte[2] << 8)
y = bytes[3] | (byte[4] << 8)

Hooray, we're almost ready. Except not. We may need more info to correctly interpret the data within those reports.

The Logical Minimum and Logical Maximum specify the value range of the actual data. We need this to tell us whether the data is signed and what the allowable range is. Together with the Physical Minimumand the Physical Maximum they specify what the values really mean. In the simple case:


Usage Page (Generic Desktop)
Usage (X)
Usage (Y)
Report Count (2)
Report Size (16)
Logical Minimum (-32767)
Logical Maximum (32767)
Input (Data,Var,Rel)

This just means our x/y data is signed. Easy. But consider this combination:


...
Logical Minimum (0)
Logical Maximum (1)
Physical Minimum (1)
Physical Maximum (12)

This means that if the bit is 0, the effective value is 1. If the bit is 1, the effective value is 12.

Note that the above is one report only. Devices may have multiple Reports, indicated by the Report ID. So our Report Descriptor may look like this:


Report ID (01)
Usage Page (Button)
Usage Minimum (1)
Usage Maximum (5)
Report Count (5)
Report Size (1)
Input (Data,Var,Abs)
Report Size (3)
Report Count (1)
Input (Cnst,Arr,Abs)

Report ID (02)
Usage Page (Generic Desktop)
Usage (X)
Usage (Y)
Report Count (2)
Report Size (16)
Input (Data,Var,Rel)

If we were to get a Report now, we need to check byte 0 for the Report ID so we know what this is. i.e. our single-use hard-coded parser would look like this:


if byte[0] == 0x01:
button_state = byte[1] & 0x1f
else if byte[0] == 0x02:
x = bytes[2] | (byte[3] << 8)
y = bytes[4] | (byte[5] << 8)

A device may use multiple Reports if the hardware doesn't gather all data within the same hardware bits. Now, you may ask: if I get fifteen reports, how should I know what belongs together? Good question, and lucky for you the HID designers are miles ahead of you. Report IDs are grouped into Collections.

Collections can have multiple types. An Application Collectiondescribes a set of inputs that make sense as a whole. Usually, every Report Descriptor must define at least one Application Collection but you may have two or more. For example, a a keyboard with integrated trackpoint should and/or would use two. This is how the kernel knows it needs to create two separate event nodes for the device. Application Collections have a few reserved Usages that indicate to the host what type of device this is. These are e.g. Mouse, Joystick, Consumer Control. If you ever wondered why you have a device named like "Logitech G500s Laser Gaming Mouse Consumer Control" this is the kernel simply appending the Application Collection's Usage to the device name.

A Physical Collection indicates that the data is collected at one physical point though what a point is is a bit blurry. Theoretical physicists will disagree but a point can be "a mouse". So it's quite common for all reports on a mouse to be wrapped in one Physical Collections. If you have a device with two sets of sensors, you'd have two collections to illustrate which ones go together. Physical Collections also have reserved Usages like Pointer or Head Tracker.

Finally, a Logical Collection just indicates that some bits of data belong together, whatever that means. The HID spec uses the example of buffer length field and buffer data but it's also common for all inputs from a mouse to be grouped together. A quick check of my mice here shows that Logitech doesn't wrap the data into a Logical Collection but Microsoft's firmware does. Because where would we be if we all did the same thing...

Anyway. Now that we know about collections, let's look at a whole report descriptor as seen in the wild:


Usage Page (Generic Desktop)
Usage (Mouse)
Collection (Application)
Usage Page (Generic Desktop)
Usage (Mouse)
Collection (Logical)
Report ID (26)
Usage (Pointer)
Collection (Physical)
Usage Page (Button)
Usage Minimum (1)
Usage Maximum (5)
Report Count (5)
Report Size (1)
Logical Minimum (0)
Logical Maximum (1)
Input (Data,Var,Abs)
Report Size (3)
Report Count (1)
Input (Cnst,Arr,Abs)
Usage Page (Generic Desktop)
Usage (X)
Usage (Y)
Report Count (2)
Report Size (16)
Logical Minimum (-32767)
Logical Maximum (32767)
Input (Data,Var,Rel)
Usage (Wheel)
Physical Minimum (0)
Physical Maximum (0)
Report Count (1)
Report Size (16)
Logical Minimum (-32767)
Logical Maximum (32767)
Input (Data,Var,Rel)
End Collection
End Collection
End Collection

We have one Application Collection (Generic Desktop, Mouse) that contains one Logical Collection (Generic Desktop, Mouse). That contains one Physical Collection (Generic Desktop, Pointer). Our actual Report (and we have only one but it has the decimal ID 26) has 5 buttons, two 16-bit axes (x and y) and finally another 16 bit axis for the Wheel. This device will thus send 8-byte reports and our parser will do:


if byte[0] != 0x1a: # it's decimal in the above descriptor
error, should be 26
button_state = byte[1] & 0x1f
x = byte[2] | (byte[3] << 8)
y = byte[4] | (byte[5] << 8)
wheel = byte[6] | (byte[7] << 8)

That's it. Now, obviously, you can't write a parser for every HID descriptor out there so your actual parsing code needs to be generic. The Linux kernel does exactly that and so does everything else that needs to parse HID. There's a huge variety in devices out there, all with HID descriptors that may or may not be correct. As with so much in life, correct HID implementations are often defined by "whatever Windows accepts" so if you like playing catch, Linux development is for you.

Oh, in case you just got a bit too optimistic about the state of the world: HID allows for vendor-defined usages. Which does exactly what you'd think it does, it hides vendor-specific protocol inside what should be a generic protocol. There are devices with hidden report IDs that you can only unlock by sending the right magic sequence to the report and/or by defeating the boss on Level 4. Usually those devices present themselves as basic/normal devices over HID but if you know the magic sequence you get to use *gasp* all buttons. Or access the device-specific configuration features. Logitech's HID++ is just one example here but at least that's one where we have most of the specs available.

The above describes how to parse the HID report descriptor and interpret the reports. But what happens once you have a HID report correctly parsed? In the case of the Linux kernel, once the report descriptor is parsed evdev nodes are created (one per Application Collection, more or less). As the Reports come in, they are mapped to evdev codes and the data appears on the evdev node. That's where userspace like libinput can pick it up. That bit is actually quite simple (mostly anyway).

The above output was generated with the tools from the hid-tools repository. Go forth and hid-record.

15 Dec 2018 4:47am GMT

14 Dec 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Bastien Nocera: The tools of libfprint

libfprint, the fingerprint reader driver library, is nearing a 1.0 release.

Since the last time I reported on the status of the library, we've made some headway modernising the library, using a variety of different tools. Let's go through them and how they were used.

Callcatcher

When libfprint was in its infancy, Daniel Drake found the NBIS fingerprint processing library matched what was required to provide fingerprint matching algorithms, and imported it in libfprint. Since then, the code in this copy-paste library in libfprint stayed the same. When updating it to the latest available version (from 2015 rather than 2007), as well as splitting off a patch to make it easier to update the library again in the future, I used Callcatcher to cull the unused functions.

Callcatcher is not a "production-level" tool (too many false positives, lack of support for many common architectures, etc.), but coupled with manual checking, it allowed us to greatly reduce the number of functions in our copy, so they weren't reported when using other source code quality checking tools.

LLVM's scan-build

This is a particularly easy one to use as its use is integrated into meson, and available through ninja scan-build. The output of the tool, whether on stderr, or on the HTML pages, is pretty similar to Coverity's, but the tool is free, and easily integrated into a CI (once you've fixed all the bugs, obviously). We found plenty of possible memory leaks and unintialised variables using this, with more flexibility than using Coverity's web interface, and avoiding going through hoops when using its "source code check as a service" model.

cflow and callgraph

LLVM has another tool, called callgraph. It's not yet integrated into meson, which was a bit of a problem to get some output out of it. But combined with cflow, we used it to find where certain functions were called, trying to find the origin of some variables (whether they were internal or device-provided for example), which helped with implementing additional guards and assertions in some parts of the library, in particular inside the NBIS sub-directory.

0.99.0 is out

We're not yet completely done with the first pass at modernising libfprint and its ecosystem, but we released an early Yule present with version 0.99.0. It will be integrated into Fedora after the holidays if the early testing goes according to plan.

We also expect a great deal from our internal driver API reference. If you have a fingerprint reader that's unsupported, contact your laptop manufacturer about them providing a Linux driver for it and point them at this documentation.

A number of laptop vendors are already asking their OEM manufacturers to provide drivers to be merged upstream, but a little nudge probably won't hurt.

Happy holidays to you all, and see you for some more interesting features in the new year.

14 Dec 2018 4:04pm GMT