31 Aug 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Quicklisp news: August 2018 Quicklisp dist update now available

New projects:

Updated projects: 3d-matrices, 3d-vectors, a-cl-logger, acclimation, ahungry-fleece, alexa, algebraic-data-library, april, arc-compat, array-utils, bodge-sndfile, caveman, cepl, cepl.drm-gbm, chirp, cl+ssl, cl-ana, cl-bnf, cl-bootstrap, cl-colors2, cl-conllu, cl-csv, cl-dbi, cl-feedparser, cl-flac, cl-flow, cl-fond, cl-gamepad, cl-gendoc, cl-generator, cl-gpio, cl-grace, cl-i18n, cl-k8055, cl-kanren, cl-libuv, cl-mixed, cl-monitors, cl-mpg123, cl-oclapi, cl-opengl, cl-out123, cl-patterns, cl-ppcre, cl-progress-bar, cl-project, cl-pslib, cl-pslib-barcode, cl-sdl2-ttf, cl-soil, cl-soloud, cl-spidev, cl-str, cl-virtualbox, cl-wayland, cl-yesql, clack, claw, clip, clml, closer-mop, clss, clunit2, colleen, configuration.options, conium, croatoan, crypto-shortcuts, curry-compose-reader-macros, dartsclhashtree, deeds, deferred, definitions, delta-debug, deploy, dexador, dissect, dml, documentation-utils, dufy, eazy-gnuplot, eazy-project, eclector, fare-scripts, fast-http, flare, flow, flute, for, form-fiddle, fxml, glsl-spec, glsl-toolkit, golden-utils, gsll, halftone, harmony, humbler, ironclad, jsonrpc, kenzo, lack, lambda-fiddle, lass, legit, lichat-protocol, lichat-serverlib, lichat-tcp-client, lichat-tcp-server, lichat-ws-server, lionchat, lisp-executable, lispbuilder, listopia, lquery, maiden, mcclim, mito, modularize, modularize-hooks, modularize-interfaces, more-conditions, multiposter, neo4cl, nibbles, nineveh, north, oclcl, opticl, overlord, oxenfurt, parachute, pathname-utils, perlre, piping, plump, plump-bundle, plump-sexp, plump-tex, postmodern, qlot, qt-libs, qtools, qtools-ui, racer, random-state, ratify, redirect-stream, rfc2388, rutils, sanitized-params, sel, serapeum, shadow, simple-inferiors, simple-tasks, slime, snooze, softdrink, south, spinneret, staple, stumpwm, sxql, terminfo, thnappy, tooter, trace-db, trivial-arguments, trivial-battery, trivial-benchmark, trivial-clipboard, trivial-gray-streams, trivial-indent, trivial-main-thread, trivial-mimes, trivial-thumbnail, umbra, usocket, uuid, varjo, verbose, vgplot, whofields, with-c-syntax, woo, wookie, xml.location.

Removed projects: cl-clblas, cl-proj.

There are no direct problems with cl-clblas and cl-proj. They are victims of a hard drive crash on my end, and an incomplete recovery. I have not been able to set up the foreign libraries required to build those projects in time for this month's release.

If you want to continue using cl-clblas and cl-proj, there are a few options:

Sorry for any inconvenience this may cause. I hope to have it fully resolved in the September 2018 update.

To get this update, use (ql:update-dist "quicklisp").

Enjoy!

31 Aug 2018 8:02pm GMT

27 Aug 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Zach Beane: A Road to Common Lisp - Steve Losh

A Road to Common Lisp - Steve Losh

27 Aug 2018 4:47pm GMT

26 Aug 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Paul Khuong: Restartable Sequences With the Polysemic Null Segment Selector

Implementing non-blocking algorithms is one of the few things that are easier to code in a kernel than in userspace (the only other one I can think of is physically wrecking a machine). In the kernel, we only have to worry about designing a protocol that achieves forward progress even if some threads stop participating. We must guarantee the absence of conceptual locks (we can't have operations that must be paired, or barriers that everyone must reach), but are free to implement the protocol by naïvely spinlocking around individual steps: kernel code can temporarily disable preemption and interrupts to bound a critical section's execution time.

Getting these non-blocking protocols right is still challenging, but the challenge is one fundamental for reliable systems. The same problems, solutions, and space/functionality trade-offs appear in all distributed systems. Some would even argue that the kind of interfaces that guarantee lock- or wait- freedom are closer to the object oriented ideals.

Of course, there is still a place for clever instruction sequences that avoid internal locks, for code that may be paused anywhere without freezing the whole system: interrupts can't always be disabled, read operations should avoid writing to shared memory if they can, and a single atomic read-modify-write operation may be faster than locking. The key point for me is that this complexity is opt-in: we can choose to tackle it incrementally, as a performance problem rather than as a prerequisite for correctness.

We don't have the same luxury in userspace. We can't start by focusing on the fundamentals of a non-blocking algorithm, and only implement interruptable sequences where it makes sense. Userspace can't disable preemption, so we must think about the minutiae of interruptable code sequences from the start; non-blocking algorithms in userspace are always in hard mode, where every step of the protocol might be paused at any instruction.

Specifically, the problem with non-blocking code in user space isn't that threads or processes can be preempted at any point, but rather that the preemption can be observed. It's a PCLSRing issue! Even Unices guarantee programmers won't observe a thread in the middle of a syscall: when a thread (process) must be interrupted, any pending syscall either runs to completion, or returns with an error1. What we need is a similar guarantee for steps of our own non-blocking protocols2.

Hardware transactional memory kind of solves the problem (preemption aborts any pending transaction) but is a bit slow3, and needs a fallback mechanism. Other emulation schemes for PCLSRing userspace code divide the problem in two:

  1. Determining that another thread was preempted in the middle of a critical section.
  2. Guaranteeing that that other thread will not blindly resume executing its critical section (i.e., knowing that the thread knows that we know it's been interrupted4).

The first part is relatively easy. For per-CPU data, it suffices to observe that we are running on a given CPU (e.g., core #4), and that another thread claims to own the same CPU's (core #4's) data. For global locks, we can instead spin for a while before entering a slow path that determines whether the holder has been preempted, by reading scheduling information in /proc.

The second part is harder. I have played with schemes that relied on signals, but was never satisfied: I found Linux perf will rarely, but not never, drop interrupts when I used it to "profile" context switches, and signaling when we determine that the holder has been pre-empted has memory visibility issues for per-CPU data5.

Until earlier this month, the best known solution on mainline Linux involved cross-modifying code! When a CPU executes a memory write instruction, that write is affected by the registers, virtual memory mappings, and the instruction's bytes. Contemporary operating systems rarely let us halt and tweak another thread's general purpose registers (Linux won't let us self-ptrace, nor pause an individual thread). Virtual memory mappings are per-process, and can't be modified from the outside. The only remaining angle is modifying the premptee's machine code.

That's what Facebook's experimental library Rseq (restartable sequences) actually does.

I'm not happy with that solution either: while it "works," it requires per-thread clones of each critical section, and makes us deal with cross-modifying code. I'm not comfortable with leaving code pages writable, and we also have to guarantee the pre-emptee's writes are visible. For me, the only defensible implementation is to modify the code by mmap-ing pages in place, which incurs an IPI per modification. The total system overhead thus scales superlinearly with the number of CPUs.

With Mathieu Desnoyers's, Paul Turner's, and Andrew Hunter's patch to add an rseq syscall to Linux 4.18, we finally have a decent answer. Rather than triggering special code when a thread detects that another thread has been pre-empted in the middle of a critical section, userspace can associate recovery code with the address range for each restartable critical section's instructions. Whenever the kernel preempts a thread, it detects whether the interruptee is in such a restartable sequence, and, if so, redirects the instruction pointer to the associated recovery code. This essentially means that critical sections must be read-only except for the last instruction in the section, but that's not too hard to satisfy. It also means that we incur recovery even when no one would have noticed, but the overhead should be marginal (there's at most one recovery per timeslice), and we get a simpler programming model in return.

Earlier this year, I found another way to prevent critical sections from resuming normal execution after being preempted. It's a total hack that exercises a state saving defect in Linux/x86-64, but I'm comfortable sharing it now that Rseq is in mainline: if anyone needs the functionality, they can update to 4.18, or backport the feature.

Here's a riddle!

riddle.c

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static const char values[] = { 'X', 'Y' };

static char
read_value(void)
{
        /*
         * New feature in GCC 6; inline asm would also works.
         * https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-6.1.0/gcc/Named-Address-Spaces.html#Named-Address-Spaces
         */
        return *(const __seg_gs char *)(uintptr_t)values;
}

int
main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        /* ... */
        char before_switch = read_value();  /* Returns 'X'. */
        usleep(1000 * 1000);  /* Or any other wait for preemption. */
        char after_switch = read_value();  /* Returns 'Y'. */
        /* ... */
}

With an appropriate setup, the read_value function above will return a different value once the executing thread is switched out. No, the kernel isn't overwriting read-only data while we're switched out. When I listed the set of inputs that affect a memory store or load instruction (general purpose registers, virtual memory mappings, and the instruction bytes), I left out one last x86 thing: segment registers.

Effective addresses on x86oids are about as feature rich as it gets: they sum a base address, a shifted index, a constant offset, and, optionally, a segment base. Today, we simply use segment bases to implement thread-local storage (each thread's FS or GS offset points to its thread-local block), but that usage repurposes memory segmentation, an old 8086 feature... and x86-64 still maintains some backward compatibility with its 16-bit ancestor. There's a lot of unused complexity there, so it's plausible that we'll find information leaks or otherwise flawed architectural state switching by poking around segment registers.

How to set that up

After learning about this trick to observe interrupts from userland, I decided to do a close reading of Linux's task switching code on x86-64 and eventually found this interesting comment6.

Observing a value of 0 in the FS or GS registers can mean two things:

  1. Userspace explicitly wrote the null segment selector in there, and reset the segment base to 0.
  2. The kernel wrote a 0 in there before setting up the segment base directly, with WR{FS,GS}BASE or by writing to a model-specific register (MSR).

Hardware has to efficiently keep track of which is actually in effect. If userspace wrote a 0 in FS or GS, prefixing an instruction with that segment has no impact; if the MSR write is still active (and is non-zero), using that segment must impact effective address computation.

There's no easy way to do the same in software. Even in ring 0, the only sure-fire way to distinguish between the two cases is to actually read the current segment base value, and that's slow. Linux instead fast-paths the common case, where the segment register is 0 because the kernel is handling segment bases. It prioritises that use case so much that the code knowingly sacrifices correctness when userspace writes 0 in a segment register after asking the kernel to setup its segment base directly.

This incorrectness is acceptable because it only affects the thread that overwrites its segment register, and no one should go through that sequence of operations. Legacy code can still manipulate segment descriptor tables and address them in segment registers. However, being legacy code, it won't use the modern syscall that directly manipulates the segment base. Modern code can let the kernel set the segment base without playing with descriptor tables, and has no reason to look at segment registers.

The only way to observe the buggy state saving is to go looking for it, with something like the code below (which uses GS because FS is already taken by glibc to implement thread-local storage).

h4x.c

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#define RUN_ME /*
gcc-6 -std=gnu99 $0 -o h4x && ./h4x; exit $?;

Should output
Reads: XXYX
Re-reads: XYX
*/
#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <asm/prctl.h>
#include <assert.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/prctl.h>
#include <sys/syscall.h>
#include <unistd.h>

static const char values[] = { 'X', 'Y' };

/* Directly set GS's base with a syscall. */
static void
set_gs_base(unsigned long base)
{
        int ret = syscall(__NR_arch_prctl, ARCH_SET_GS, base);
        assert(ret == 0);
}

/* Write a 0 in GS. */
static void
set_gs(unsigned short value)
{
        asm volatile("movw %0, %%gs" :: "r"(value) : "memory");
}

/* Read gs:values[0]. */
static char
read_value(void)
{
        /*
         * New feature in GCC 6; inline asm would also works.
         * https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-6.1.0/gcc/Named-Address-Spaces.html#Named-Address-Spaces
         */
        return *(const __seg_gs char *)(uintptr_t)values;
}

int
main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        char reads[4];
        char re_reads[3];

        reads[0] = read_value();
        reads[1] = (set_gs(0), read_value());
        reads[2] = (set_gs_base(1), read_value());
        reads[3] = (set_gs(0), read_value());

        printf("Reads: %.4s\n", reads);
        fflush(NULL);

        re_reads[0] = read_value();
        re_reads[1] = (usleep(1000 * 1000), read_value());
        re_reads[2] = (set_gs(0), read_value());

        printf("Re-reads: %.3s\n", re_reads);
        return 0;
}

Running the above on my Linux 4.14/x86-64 machine yields

$ gcc-6 -std=gnu99 h4x.c && ./a.out
Reads: XXYX
Re-reads: XYX

The first set of reads shows that:

  1. our program starts with no offset in GS (reads[0] == values[0])
  2. explicitly setting GS to 0 does not change that (reads[1] == values[0])
  3. changing the GS base to 1 with arch_prctl does work (reads[2] == values[1])
  4. resetting the GS selector to 0 resets the base (reads[3] == values[0]).

The second set of reads shows that:

  1. the reset base survives short syscalls (re_reads[0] == values[0])
  2. an actual context switch reverts the GS base to the arch_prctl value (re_reads[1] == values[1])
  3. writing a 0 in GS resets the base again (re_reads[2] == values[0]).

Cute hack, why is it useful?

The property demonstrated in the hack above is that, after our call to arch_prctl, we can write a 0 in GS with a regular instruction to temporarily reset the GS base to 0, and know it will revert to the arch_prctl offset again when the thread resumes execution, after being suspended.

We now have to ensure our restartable sequences are no-ops when the GS base is reset to the arch_prctl offset, and that the no-op is detected as such. For example, we could set the arch_prctl offset to something small, like 4 or 8 bytes, and make sure that any address we wish to mutate in a critical section is followed by 4 or 8 bytes of padding that can be detected as such. If a thread is switched out in the middle of a critical section, its GS base will be reset to 4 or 8 when the thread resumes execution; we must guarantee that this offset will make the critical section's writes fail.

If a write is a compare-and-swap, we only have to make sure the padding's value is unambiguously different from real data: reading the padding instead of the data will make compare-and-swap fail, and the old value will tell us that it failed because we read padding, which should only happen after the section is pre-empted. We can play similar tricks with fetch-and-add (e.g., real data is always even, while the padding is odd), or atomic bitwise operations (steal the sign bit).

If we're willing to eat a signal after a context switch, we can set the arch_prctl offset to something very large, and take a segmentation fault after being re-scheduled. Another option is to set the arch_prctl offset to 1, and use a double-wide compare-and-swap (CMPXCHG16B), or turn on the AC (alignment check) bit in EFLAGS. After a context switch, our destination address will be misaligned, which will trigger a SIGBUS that we can handle.

The last two options aren't great, but, if we make sure to regularly write a 0 in GS, signals should be triggered rarely, only when pre-emption happens between the last write to GS and a critical section. They also have the advantages of avoiding the need for padding, and making it trivial to detect when a restartable section was interrupted. Detection is crucial because it often isn't safe to assume an operation failed when it succeeded (e.g., unwittingly succeeding at popping from a memory allocator's freelist would leak memory). When a GS-prefixed instruction fails, we must be able to tell from the instruction's result, and nothing else. We can't just check if the segment base is still what we expect, after the fact: our thread could have been preempted right after the special GS-prefixed instruction, before our check.

Once we have restartable sections, we can use them to implement per-CPU data structures (instead of per-thread), or to let thread acquire locks and hold them until they are preempted: with restartable sections that only write if there was no preemption between the lock acquisition and the final store instruction, we can create a revocable lock abstraction and implement wait-free coöperation or flat-combining.

Unfortunately, our restartable sections will always be hard to debug: observing a thread's state in a regular debugger like GDB will reset the GS base and abort the section. That's not unique to the segment hack approach. Hardware transactional memory will abort critical sections when debugged, and there's similar behaviour with the official rseq syscall. It's hard enough to PCLSR userspace code; it would be even harder to PCLSR-except-when-the-interruption-is-for-debugging.

Who's to blame?

The null GS hack sounds like it only works because of a pile of questionable design decisions. However, if we look at the historical context, I'd say everything made sense.

Intel came up with segmentation back when 16 bit pointers were big, but 64KB of RAM not quite capacious enough. They didn't have 32 bit (never mind 64 bit) addresses in mind, nor threads; they only wanted to address 1 MB of RAM with their puny registers. When thread libraries abused segments to implement thread-local storage, the only other options were to over-align the stack and hide information there, or to steal a register. Neither sounds great, especially with x86's six-and-a-half general purpose registers. Finally, when AMD decided to rip out segmentation, but keep FS and GS, they needed to make porting x86 code as easy as possible, since that was the whole value proposition for AMD64 over Itanium.

I guess that's what systems programming is about. We take our tools, get comfortable with their imperfections, and use that knowledge to build new tools by breaking the ones we already have (#Mickens).

Thank you Andrew for a fun conversation that showed the segment hack might be of interest to someone else, and to Gabe for snarkily reminding us Rseq is another Linux/Silicon Valley re-invention.


  1. That's not as nice as rewinding the PC to just before the syscall, with a fixed up state that will resume the operation, but is simpler to implement, and usually good enough. Classic worst is better (Unix semantics are also safer with concurrency, but that could have been opt-in...).

  2. That's not a new observation, and SUN heads like to point to prior art like Dice's and Garthwaite's Mostly Lock-Free Malloc, Garthwaite's, Dice's, and White's work on Preemption notification for per-CPU buffers, or Harris's and Fraser's Revocable locks. Linux sometimes has to reinvent everything with its special flavour.

  3. For instance, SuperMalloc optimistically uses TSX to access per-CPU caches, but TSX is slow enough that SuperMalloc first tries to use a per-thread cache. Dice and Harris explored the use of hardware transactional lock elision solely to abort on context switches; they maintained high system throughput under contention by trying the transaction once before falling back to a regular lock.

  4. I did not expect systems programming to get near multi-agent epistemic logic ;)

  5. Which is fixable with LOCKed instructions, but that defeats the purpose of per-CPU data.

  6. I actually found the logic bug before the Spectre/Meltdown fire drill and was worried the hole would be plugged. This one survived the purge. fingers crossed

26 Aug 2018 1:57am GMT