27 May 2015

feedSearch Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Google Brings App Indexing Support To iOS Apps

iOS apps now are being supported by Google within the App Indexing protocol. Starting in a few weeks, iOS users may see content from apps in their mobile search results. The post Google Brings App Indexing Support To iOS Apps appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

27 May 2015 3:15pm GMT

7 Audience Targeting Data Types Versus Search Data (The Keyword Is Still The Undefeated Champ)

Columnist Josh Dreller argues that when it comes to audience targeting, nothing beats keyword search data. The post 7 Audience Targeting Data Types Versus Search Data (The Keyword Is Still The Undefeated Champ) appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

27 May 2015 2:01pm GMT

Bing Integrates How Old Robot Feature Into Image Search

Bing Image Search experiments with guessing at the age of the people in their image search results. Give it a try at How-Old.net or on Bing Image Search. The post Bing Integrates How Old Robot Feature Into Image Search appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

27 May 2015 12:53pm GMT

feedHome - SearchEngineWatch

Four Mobile Dos and Don'ts for SMBs

As Google and Bing change their algorithms to favor mobile-friendly sites, it's crucial for small and medium businesses to become more diligent about mobile-optimizing their sites.

27 May 2015 12:30pm GMT

Why a Professional Press Center Boosts Your Link Building Campaigns

More than just a place to publish your past press releases, a press center makes your very best content easily available for anyone who might write about and link to your site.

27 May 2015 11:30am GMT

26 May 2015

feedHome - SearchEngineWatch

Bing Places Connects Consumers With Local Businesses

Bing Places for Business allows marketers to add information to their search result listings, such as contact information and photos.

26 May 2015 10:48pm GMT

feedThe Official Google Blog

Pursuing transformative technology with the Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities

When Laura Palmaro was 10 years old, she woke one morning to find that the central vision in her left eye had all but disappeared. She was not ill and had no genetic issues-it was completely out of the blue. When she was 14, the same rare condition struck her right eye, and she began her freshman year of high school legally blind. Suddenly she was forced to depend on other people to read everything aloud, from school assignments to menus. The toughest part, according to Laura, was losing her sense of independence-and not knowing when or how she would get it back.

Laura has since adopted technological solutions to her vision challenges, using a combination of screen-readers and magnification software to read, work and more. Now a program manager at Google, she is following her passion, helping Chrome and Chrome OS teams make their products more accessible. "Technology has truly transformed my life," she says. "Assistive technology can tear down boundaries, and empower people to find their independence and fulfill their dreams."

We agree with Laura about the power of technology to change lives. And in order to support more people like her-people who see obstacles as opportunities-we're launching the Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities. We're putting $20 million in Google.org grants behind nonprofits using emerging technologies to increase independence for people living with disabilities, and today we're issuing an open call to identify new areas of opportunity at g.co/ImpactChallengeDisability.

We're kicking things off with support for two remarkable organizations. Each of these organizations is using technology to dramatically reduce the cost of and access to prosthetic limbs and auditory therapy, respectively-which could be transformative for hundreds of millions of people.


The Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities will seek out nonprofits and help them find new solutions to some serious "what ifs" for the disabled community. We will choose the best of these ideas and help them to scale by investing in their vision, by rallying our people and by mobilizing our resources in support of their missions.

But of course, we realize there's always room to improve our products as well. We have a team committed to monitoring the accessibility of Google tools; and we provide engineering teams with training to incorporate accessibility principles into products and services. That doesn't just mean improving existing Google tools, it means developing new ones as well. For example, Liftware is a stabilizing utensil designed to help people with hand tremors eat more easily, and self-driving cars could one day transform mobility for everyone.

Historically, people living with disabilities have relied on technologies that were often bulky, expensive, and limited to assisting with one or two specific tasks. But that's beginning to change. Thanks to groups like Enable and World Wide Hearing, and with tools like Liftware, we're starting to see the potential for technologies that can profoundly and affordably impact millions. But we'll all get there sooner if we make it a team effort-which is why we're launching Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities today. Together, we can create a better world, faster.

Posted by Jacquelline Fuller, Director, Google.org

26 May 2015 3:00pm GMT

A doodle salute for Sally Ride

Today's guest blog post is from Tam O'Shaughnessy-life partner of astronaut Sally Ride, and co-founder & CEO of Sally Ride Science. Over the past few months, Tam worked with our Doodle team to create a doodle for Sally's 64th birthday. In this post, she tells us more about Sally's life, her flight aboard the space shuttle Challenger, and her passion for helping kids stay excited about science and technology. -Ed.

As the first American woman in space, Sally Ride-who would have been 64 today-captured the nation's imagination as a symbol of the ability of women to break barriers. But her historic flight represented just one aspect of a remarkable and multifaceted life. She was also a physicist, a science writer, and an inspirational advocate for keeping kids excited about science as they go through school.

Sally was born on May 26, 1951, in Los Angeles. She grew up playing with a chemistry set and small telescope-and playing football in the streets with the neighborhood kids. Later she considered playing professional tennis, but decided instead to study science.

In 1977, Sally was finishing her Ph.D. in physics at Stanford University when she saw an article in the student newspaper saying that NASA was looking for astronauts-and for the first time was allowing women to apply. Sally didn't hesitate to send in her application, and became one of six women selected as part of the new crop of astronaut candidates. On June 18, 1983, she soared into history as the first American woman in space.


A look behind the scenes of today's Sally Ride doodle, narrated by the artist of the doodle, Olivia Huynh, and Tam O'Shaughnessy


Looking back at Earth through the window of the space shuttle, Sally was moved by the view of our beautiful blue planet wrapped in its thin blanket of air. She realized how important it is for all of us to take care of our fragile home in space, and became an environmentalist. Many years later, we wrote books for young adults about Earth's changing climate.

After leaving NASA, Sally became a professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego. She loved being a scientist, but she was concerned that many young people-especially girls and minority students-abandon their early interest in science and math.

Studies show that the reason kids turn away from STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) is not that they don't like it or aren't good it. Instead, young people get turned off because society sends false messages about who scientists are, what they do, and how they work. So Sally decided to use her high profile to motivate young people to stick with their interest in science and to consider pursuing STEM careers.

In 2001, Sally and I and three friends started Sally Ride Science to create programs and publications that bring science to life and show young people that STEM is fascinating, creative, and fun. Since then, we've trained thousands of teachers on how to spark and sustain interest in STEM and reached millions of students with our books and programs.

Sally died almost three years ago on July 23, 2012, from pancreatic cancer. But I know she would be honored by today's Google Doodle. With whimsy, it expresses Sally's sense of fun and adventure, and her ability to inspire young people. And who knows-maybe her Doodle will motivate some girl or boy somewhere in the world to become a scientist and adventurer just like Sally.

Sally said it best . . .

Everywhere I go I meet girls and boys who want to be astronauts and explore space, or they love the ocean and want to be oceanographers, or they love animals and want to be zoologists, or they love designing things and want to be engineers. I want to see those same stars in their eyes in 10 years and know they are on their way!


Posted by Tam O'Shaughnessy, Co-Founder & CEO of Sally Ride Science

26 May 2015 4:56am GMT

22 May 2015

feedThe Official Google Blog

Through the Google lens: Search trends May 15-21

Between finding out what everyone has always wanted to say to Dave Letterman, and singing along to Taylor's "Bad Blood," here's a look at what everyone was searching for this week:

Deadly biker brawl
A shooting between rival motorcycle gangs in Waco, Texas, left nine dead and more than 170 people in jail this week. There were more than 500,000 searches for "Waco shooting" on Sunday as people asked questions like "What biker gangs are in Texas?" and "What county is Waco, Texas in?" to try to understand why the shooting may have happened.

An NBA family affair
The NBA playoffs continue to be a top topic in search as the conference finals began this week, with the Golden State Warriors and the Houston Rockets matchup garnering the most attention. (The Cavaliers made the trends charts on Wednesday, but otherwise all eyes are on the West.) After going down 2-0 to the Warriors, the Rockets are in the spotlight, with 200,000+ searches following their game 1 loss. But the search standout, not surprisingly, is NBA MVP and Warriors point guard Stephen Curry. And not just for his sweet three-point stroke. There were 50,000+ searches for his mom, Sonya Curry, after she appeared looking ageless at Tuesday's game, while others were interested in his daughter Riley's post-game press conference hijinks. In fact, three out of the top five Curry-related searches on Wednesday were about his family.

Thanks, Dave
David Letterman ended his 33-year career in late-night TV on Wednesday night. His farewell show featured favorite clips from the past, some classic Dave self-deprecation and a Top 10 list to top all Top 10 lists starring celebs like Steve Martin, Julia Louis-Dreyfus and (Dave's apparent favorite) Peyton Manning. Dave was at the top of the search list, too, with more than 500,000+ searches-consider it a small consolation for not getting "The Tonight Show." Top questions leading up to the last show included "How tall is David Letterman?" and "Who is taking over for Letterman?" (Answer: someone else who brought a crew of celebs to his final show last December.)

Billboard stars
The Billboard Music Awards swept the search charts on Sunday, with big-time winner Taylor Swift at the top of the pack. Swift had a big night, taking home eight trophies and a million searches. She also debuted her much-buzzed-about music video for "Bad Blood," which featured Kendrick Lamar and a full squad of Taylor's celebrity friends, including Cindy Crawford, Lena Dunham and Karlie Kloss. The video broke the Vevo record with more than 20 million views in 24 hours, and appeared in Hot Trends twice. But even Taylor has to share the spotlight sometime: people were also searching for show performers Iggy Azalea, John Legend, Kelly Clarkson and Wiz Khalifa.

Elsewhere in Billboard news, the soundtrack for "Pitch Perfect 2" climbed to No. 1 on the Billboard 200 this week as fans became hooked on the fun cover songs and mashups. The movie has been big in search over the past week, with lots of interest in the cast, particularly Rebel Wilson.

Tip of the week
Now you can find real-time content from Twitter in your Google search results on mobile. So if you want to see what others are saying about tonight's Cavaliers/Hawks game, just ask Google.

Posted by Emily Wood, Managing Editor, who searched this week for [leighton meester] and [how many cows are there in the world]

22 May 2015 9:55pm GMT

feedGoogle Operating System

Discontinued Service in Google's App Launcher

For some reason, Google's app launcher doesn't let you remove Google services. You can add Google products, change their order, move them to the "More" section, but you can't delete them.

Helpouts was discontinued last month, but it's still included in Google's navigation menu. If you've added the Helpouts shortcut to your navigation menu, you can still click it and find that "Helpouts is no longer available."


Fortunately, there's a Chrome extension that lets you add almost any Google service to the app launcher and also remove shortcuts.

22 May 2015 2:17pm GMT

From Google Webmaster Tools to Google Search Console

Google Webmaster Tools has a new name: it's now called Google Search Console. Why change the name? "It turns out that the traditional idea of the 'webmaster' reflects only some of you. We have all kinds of Webmaster Tools fans: hobbyists, small business owners, SEO experts, marketers, programmers, designers, app developers, and, of course, webmasters as well," explains Google.


Google Search Console will continue to offer the same features, including Google Search analytics, information about external and internal links, mobile usability issues, crawling and indexing issues, security and spam.

There are some other consoles for Google services: Google Play Developer Console for Android, Google Developers Console for projects that use Google APIs and Google Cloud, Google Admin Console for Google Apps.

{ Thanks, Mukil Elango. }

22 May 2015 1:47pm GMT

21 May 2015

feedGoogle Operating System

Google Tone

Google Tone is an experimental Chrome extension for sharing the URL of the current tab with other computers. It doesn't use Bluetooth, NFC or WiFi: it only sends audio tones. "Google Tone turns on your computer's microphone (while the extension is on) and uses your computer's speakers to exchange URLs with nearby computers connected to the Internet."

For some reason, Google requires to be logged in to a Google account and to be online. Your Google Profile name and picture are displayed next to the notification. I'm not sure why this feature isn't optional.


Google Research Blog has more information about this experiment. "Tone provides an easy-to-understand broadcast mechanism that behaves like the human voice - it doesn't pass through walls like radio or require pairing or addressing. The initial prototype used an efficient audio transmission scheme that sounded terrible, so we played it beyond the range of human hearing. However, because many laptop microphones and nearly all video conferencing systems are optimized for voice, it improved reliability considerably to also include a minimal DTMF-based audible codec. The combination is reliable for short distances in the majority of audio environments even at low volumes, and it even works over Hangouts."

The extension doesn't work all the time, so make sure to turn up your volume, turn on your computer's microphone and unplug your headphones. When it works, it's a cool way to share the current tab with all the computers around you, assuming that they use Chrome and this extension is installed.

21 May 2015 7:59pm GMT

01 Nov 2011

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Grow a moustache and fight cancer!

For my next 30 day challenge, I'll be growing a mustache to raise awareness and money for men's health issues, and specifically prostate cancer research. Men of search and SEO, please join our team. You can raise awareness, or raise cash. And it's super simple: just don't shave your moustache for 30 days. The name [...]

01 Nov 2011 6:16pm GMT

31 Oct 2011

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Halloween costume: stickman from xkcd

For Halloween this year I asked people on Google+ what I should be for Halloween, and someone suggested going as the blackhat stick man from xkcd. You know, this guy: That sounded like a good challenge. I finished the costume and taped a video, but unfortunately I didn't have enough time to get the video [...]

31 Oct 2011 5:16pm GMT

24 Oct 2011

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Halloween Pumpkin: Portal Turret!

I made a Portal turret for my Halloween pumpkin! I was trying to think of things to carve: vampire Android? R2-D2? Zoidberg? Then I thought: I could do a character from Portal 2! I was going to carve something like GLaDOS or Wheatley, but then I realized that a portal turret would be perfect: To [...]

24 Oct 2011 3:26pm GMT

26 Aug 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

The Emperor's Garden

The Emperor instructed the gardener to set up the new court's garden. "I want you to plant five trees growing the Crataan fruit," the Emperor said, "Because we asked people what fruit they like best, and most named the Crataan fruit!" The gardener replied, "Emperor, that is excellent thinking! But let me make some suggestions: First, how about we make one of the five trees bear the Muran fruit. Only one out of ten citizens loves it, but those peculiar citizens tend to love multiple times as much!" "Second," the gardener continued, "How about we make one of the five trees bear the Dratean fruit. No one loves it, but that's because no one knows it yet!" "Third," the gardener said, "How about we leave one spot in the garden empty. Who knows what new type of tree we'll discover that we can put there in the fut ...

26 Aug 2011 12:12pm GMT

15 Aug 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Color Sound Machine (and what else I've been doing lately)

For those of you who've been wondering whether I had turned to stone, fallen into a bottomless pit, or been climbing the Himalaya... no, none of that is true, even though you probably did notice I'm not actively blogging about Google here anymore*! Just now, a new iPad app I've been working on called Color Sound Machine went live, and this -- and all the other apps and games at Versus Pad** -- are actually what I am doing while not blogoscoping. *I've drafted unpublished posts explaining much more about past, present and future of Blogoscoped, and the history of Google news reporting, but ... oh, for now le ...

15 Aug 2011 4:00pm GMT

25 Feb 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Google drops reverse phone number lookup

One of the earliest specialist services provided by Google was reverse phone number lookup. If you used the "phonebook:" or "rphonebook:" operators together with a 10-digit US phone number, Google would show you the owner of that phone number, unless the number was unlisted. Google no longer provides that service. Not surprisingly, there was no press release marking the closure, but Google employee Daniel Russell has acknowledged the closure of the service in his blog. He hints at the possible pressures leading to the shuttering of the service: "As you can imagine, this was an endless source of hassles for people (who were surprised to see themselves searchable on Google) and for Google (who had to constantly de ...

25 Feb 2011 11:23am GMT