25 Nov 2015

feedSearch Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

SearchCap: Google Store Data, AdWords Shopping Ads & Semantic Search

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web. The post SearchCap: Google Store Data, AdWords Shopping Ads & Semantic Search appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

25 Nov 2015 9:00pm GMT

feedOfficial Google Blog

Google gobble: Thanksgiving trends on Search

In just a few hours, people across the U.S. will be settling in for a day of food, family and football as they celebrate Thanksgiving. As the day of gluttony and gratitude comes closer, people have been turning to Google to plan the big meal, get cooking tips and more. Here's a look at some of the top Turkey Day searches-for more, see Google Trends.

The reason for the season
In the days leading up to Thanksgiving, people turn to Google to learn more about the origins of the holiday and its traditions, both new and old. Top questions include "Why did the pilgrims celebrate the first Thanksgiving?" and "What president made Thanksgiving a national holiday?"

The other reason for the season
Gratitude may be in the name, but food is the centerpiece of Thanksgiving. For weeks now people have been searching for recipes to wow their relatives this Thursday, from classics like cranberry relish and mashed potatoes to turkey alternatives like lasagna and beef stew. Here's a look at the top recipes that trend every November:

Even amongst regional variations, family eccentricities or that ambitious new recipe you clipped from a food magazine, there's one dish that takes the casserole on Thanksgiving Day. Stuffing is the top searched Thanksgiving recipe in 49 out of 50 states, with only North Carolina standing up proud for sweet potatoes. Our take: Why not have both?

How do I…?
Even for people whose usual meal prep consists of shuffling through take-out menus, Thanksgiving is a time to roll up your sleeves and get to work in the kitchen. That-and the fact that a 20-lb poultry dish is a little harder to put on the table than, say, the ol' blue box of mac and cheese-means it's also a time when many turn to Google to brush up on some cooking tips. In the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving, you're asking all kinds of questions, from simple queries like "how to cook spaghetti squash" and "how to boil eggs" to advanced topics like "what can I make ahead for thanksgiving?" and the very crucial, very daunting "How do you make turkey gravy?"

Let's talk turkey
The top Thanksgiving recipe question, however, is focused on the main dish: "How to cook a turkey?" Related questions include "how much turkey do you cook per person?" (Answer: there's math involved but the most important part is making enough for sandwiches for multiple days after), followed quickly by "How long to cook a turkey?" (answer: more math).

And though roasting is still the top trending technique method for cooking the big bird, enterprising (or efficiency-oriented) chefs across the U.S. are also searching for tips on how to smoke and deep-fry their turkeys. Proof that there's more than one way to cook a turkey.

Whether you'll be slicing into pumpkin or pecan pie, eating your turkey smoked, turduckened or made of tofu, serving up fresh cranberry sauce or popping open a can-we hope you have a happy Thanksgiving!

Posted by Emily Wood, Managing Editor, who is now very hungry

Emily Wood
Managing Editor
Google Blogs

25 Nov 2015 5:00pm GMT

feedSearch Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

3 Google Patents You Need To Know About In 2016

Columnist Pratik Dholakiya outlines three patents that Google is applying for and explains how they could affect search results for you and your clients. The post 3 Google Patents You Need To Know About In 2016 appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

25 Nov 2015 3:46pm GMT

How Trust & Unique Identification Impact Semantic Search

Is your content trustworthy, and does that matter? Columnist Barbara Starr explores how Google might be using trust as a signal when displaying search results. The post How Trust & Unique Identification Impact Semantic Search appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

25 Nov 2015 3:04pm GMT

feedSearch Engine Watch

Are Thanksgiving traditions a relic of the past? A Google Trends investigation

Using Google Trends data, here's a look into what the most popular traditions are and find out just how much things have changed since 1621.

25 Nov 2015 2:03pm GMT

Strategy advice for designing and building a mobile-friendly site

A mobile-friendly site (or app) is not an end; it is a means to that end.

25 Nov 2015 12:49pm GMT

24 Nov 2015

feedGoogle Operating System

Travel Guide Snippets in Knowledge Graph Cards

Google's Knowledge Graph cards include a lot of information from Wikipedia. Google usually shows a snippet from a Wikipedia article and links to the article. I was surprised to notice that cards for countries and big cities from all over the world no longer quote Wikipedia and now include detailed information from travel guides.

Here's an example for [France]: "France, in Western Europe, encompasses medieval and port cities, tranquil villages, mountains and Mediterranean beaches. Paris, its capital, is known worldwide for its couture fashion houses, classical art museums including the Louvre and monuments like the Eiffel Tower. The country is also renowned for its sophisticated cuisine and its wines. Lascaux's ancient cave drawings, Lyon's Roman theater and the immense Palace of Versailles are testaments to its long history."

The snippet from the corresponding Wikipedia article is less poetic: "France, officially the French Republic, is a sovereign state comprising territory in western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The European part of France, called Metropolitan France, extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. France spans 640,679 square kilometres (247,368 sq mi) and has a total population of 67 million. It is a unitary semi-presidential republic with the capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre."

24 Nov 2015 10:00pm GMT

Show Zoom Slider in Google Maps

Are you missing the zoom controls from the old Google Maps interface for the desktop? Mouse over the "-" or "+" button at the bottom of the Google Maps page and click "show slider". You'll get the old zoom slider which allows you to quickly control the zoom level of the map.

If you want to go back to the default interface, mouse over the "-" or "+" button and click "hide slider". The nice thing is that Google remembers your preference.

24 Nov 2015 9:43pm GMT

Big Offline Google Maps

I don't know about you, but my Google Maps for Android has just enabled the new offline features. Even if you have the latest version of the app, you still need to wait until these features are enabled because they're gradually rolled out.

My first disappointment is that the new features are still limited. The biggest size for an offline area you can download is 120,000 square kilometers and there are many countries that are bigger than that. I downloaded London's map and checked the size of the map: 332 MB. It also expires in 29 days (maps need to be updated at least every 30 days).

It looks like Google's maps include too much information, they take up too much space and there's no way to download some simplified maps.

Let's try one of the smallest countries in Europe: Liechtenstein, which has an area of only 160 square kilometers. The offline map has 62 MB. New York? 409 MB. Los Angeles? 356 MB. Tokyo, Seoul, Beijing, Bangkok? Not available because of licensing issues.

Forget about downloading the map for an entire country. Google Maps still can't replace the Here app or paid navigation apps.

24 Nov 2015 9:10pm GMT

feedSearch Engine Watch

What are the busiest times for stores on Black Friday?

If you want to avoid the crowds on Black Friday, avoid shopping between 2pm and 4pm. At least, thats what Google's location data says.

24 Nov 2015 2:33pm GMT

23 Nov 2015

feedOfficial Google Blog

Discover Jordan’s past and present in Google Maps

Starting today you can explore more than 30 historical sites throughout Jordan in Google Street View. To tell you more, read today's guest blog post, by Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan. -Ed.

What a great day for Jordan and Jordanians! Thanks to Google Street View, we can now share the rich, proud and varied history of our country with anyone who has an Internet connection. With more than 30 historical sites available to explore virtually, people all over the world now have a window into our beautiful Kingdom in the heart of the Middle East.

Throughout the ages, ancient civilizations have left their footprints in Jordan. Reminders of the Silk Road which linked the regions of the world in commerce. Ancient cities, such as the Romans' Jerash and the Nabateans' Petra. Significant religious sites, like Mount Nebo and the River Jordan. And, to this day, we continue to discover such footprints.

With Google Street View, would-be visitors, or those just curious to learn more about our ancient lands, can explore Jordan's unique historical heritage online. That's one of the reasons I love this technology. Not only does it connect millions of people from all corners of the world, it provides a lens on the past. And when we understand more about each other's stories and cultures and histories, we realize that we are more alike than we are different. That's why we must preserve these treasures for future generations. They're a doorway to our shared narrative.

To this day, after too many trips to count, Jordan's ancient archeological site, the Rose-Red city of Petra, still fills me with awe. Concealed in majestic mountain gorges, visitors can wander through the entire city of Petra, imagining what life was like in the thriving trading center and capital of the Nabataean kingdom. Carved by hand into vibrant red, white and pink sandstone cliffs, it has, miraculously, survived earthquakes to withstand the test of time. Film buffs might recognize it from Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade when Harrison Ford and Sean Connery joined forces in their quest to find the Holy Grail. Now, you can step back in time and take a narrated tour of this hidden gem, exploring the tombs, sites and amphitheater that span an area the size of lower Manhattan.

The Treasury in Petra is estimated to be more than 2,000 years old

Jerash is the second most visited site outside Petra. It's considered one of the best preserved examples of Roman architecture outside Italy. With one click, you can stroll through its ruins, walk its streets, sing in its theaters and contemplate life in its baths and temples. Before you leave, remember to send a message through the city's ancient whispering columns!

Jerash Roman South Theater can fit more than 3000 people

Colonnaded Street - Jerash, Jordan

Mount Nebo, located 10 km west of the Roman Byzantine town of Madaba, is one of the most revered holy sites in Jordan. While you're close to Madaba, step into its historic church to view the Madaba Mosaic Map, the oldest known geographic floor mosaic in art history.

The Madaba Mosaic Map, created in 6th century AD, originally contained more than 2 million tesserae!

The Madaba Mosaic Map in church of Saint George - Madaba, Jordan
What could be more relaxing than a float in the world's saltiest waters? A visit to the Dead Sea, the lowest point on earth, is known to be a very therapeutic experience, thanks to its oxygen-rich water and mineral-mud.

Dead Sea Panorama - Dead Sea, Jordan

While you're exploring, don't be surprised if you find a medieval castle right in the middle of the desert. We've got many-from crusader castles like Al Karak, to Ajlun Castle built by Saladin, to Umayyad desert castles Qasr Amra and Qasr Al Kharana.

Qasr Kharana - Jordan

Jordan remains a haven of peace and moderation in the Middle East. So, please, come and visit us. Meet and talk with our warm and hospitable people. Taste our cuisine. Learn some Arabic. Relax in the therapeutic waters of the Dead Sea and the Ma'in Springs. Marvel at the rich colors of Wadi Rum, the spectacular desert backdrop to "The Martian." Walk in the footsteps of our forebears. There's so much to see and experience.

There's something for everyone in Jordan. And I couldn't be happier that now, thanks to Google Maps, we can share our rich cultural heritage with the world. Visit g.co/Jordanhighlights to start your tour. As we say to all our visitors: ahlan wa sahlan. Hello and welcome.

Posted by Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan

Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan

23 Nov 2015 9:41pm GMT

For Star Wars fans, old and new

The first memory I have of watching a movie is with my dad. I was around four years old, and one afternoon he fired up our bulky, '80s-style front-projection TV and the Betamax, and popped in Star Wars. Of course, it was *amazing*, and I've watched the original trilogy a dozen times since.

It probably isn't a surprise that there are tons of Star Wars fans like me here at Google. You can regularly spot Darth Vaders, dogs dressed like Yoda, and even the occasional stormtrooper, roaming the halls of our data centers (probably still looking for those droids). So when we first heard about Episode VII, we started thinking about what a Google tribute to these epic stories might look like: "Wouldn't it be cool if there was some sort of Star Wars thingy in Search? The Millennium Falcon in Cardboard would be sweet! What if Google Translate could decipher galactic languages?"... and on, and on, and on. As this list of ideas grew, so too did the band of passionate engineers and product folks who wanted to build them.

We reached out to our friends at Lucasfilm and Disney, and since then we've been working together on building google.com/starwars. It's a place for fans, by fans, and starting today you can choose the light or the dark side, and then watch your favorite Google apps like Gmail, Google Maps, YouTube, Chrome and many more transform to reflect your path. And that's just the beginning. We've got more coming between now and opening night-the Millennium Falcon in all its (virtual reality) glory included, so stay tuned. And we've hidden a few easter eggs, too. So awaken the Force within, and be on the lookout for things from a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…

See you in line at the theater in December. I'll be there with my dad.

Posted by Clay Bavor, VP of Product Management

23 Nov 2015 8:16am GMT

31 Oct 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Halloween 2015: USB Drive

I went a little overboard for Halloween last year. And as you can tell from my the Halloween category on my blog, sometimes I get a little too excited about Halloween. So this year I decided to go quick, easy, and lo-fi as a USB drive: To make a thumb drive/USB key, I just took […]

31 Oct 2015 8:02pm GMT

24 Sep 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Give Google Contributor a try

Recently I've seen several interesting conversations about ad blocking, and I wanted to remind people about a great offering called Google Contributor. With Google Contributor, you contribute a certain amount of money each month. That subscription means that you see fewer ads on the web, and you support the sites that you visit with your […]

24 Sep 2015 3:09pm GMT

09 Apr 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Berkshire Hathaway

My taste in financial advice runs toward the simple and the lessons I've learned the hard way. But I still like reading about investing/finance, and I recently read through the 2014 annual report for Berkshire Hathaway. Given that it was the 50th anniversary of Warren Buffett taking charge of Berkshire, I have to admit that […]

09 Apr 2015 6:47am GMT

26 Aug 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

The Emperor's Garden

The Emperor instructed the gardener to set up the new court's garden. "I want you to plant five trees growing the Crataan fruit," the Emperor said, "Because we asked people what fruit they like best, and most named the Crataan fruit!" The gardener replied, "Emperor, that is excellent thinking! But let me make some suggestions: First, how about we make one of the five trees bear the Muran fruit. Only one out of ten citizens loves it, but those peculiar citizens tend to love multiple times as much!" "Second," the gardener continued, "How about we make one of the five trees bear the Dratean fruit. No one loves it, but that's because no one knows it yet!" "Third," the gardener said, "How about we leave one spot in the garden empty. Who knows what new type of tree we'll discover that we can put there in the fut ...

26 Aug 2011 12:12pm GMT

15 Aug 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Color Sound Machine (and what else I've been doing lately)

For those of you who've been wondering whether I had turned to stone, fallen into a bottomless pit, or been climbing the Himalaya... no, none of that is true, even though you probably did notice I'm not actively blogging about Google here anymore*! Just now, a new iPad app I've been working on called Color Sound Machine went live, and this -- and all the other apps and games at Versus Pad** -- are actually what I am doing while not blogoscoping. *I've drafted unpublished posts explaining much more about past, present and future of Blogoscoped, and the history of Google news reporting, but ... oh, for now le ...

15 Aug 2011 4:00pm GMT

25 Feb 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Google drops reverse phone number lookup

One of the earliest specialist services provided by Google was reverse phone number lookup. If you used the "phonebook:" or "rphonebook:" operators together with a 10-digit US phone number, Google would show you the owner of that phone number, unless the number was unlisted. Google no longer provides that service. Not surprisingly, there was no press release marking the closure, but Google employee Daniel Russell has acknowledged the closure of the service in his blog. He hints at the possible pressures leading to the shuttering of the service: "As you can imagine, this was an endless source of hassles for people (who were surprised to see themselves searchable on Google) and for Google (who had to constantly de ...

25 Feb 2011 11:23am GMT