04 Aug 2015

feedSearch Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

What Makes A Good SEO Program “Good”?

Search engine optimization (SEO) professionals can be quite critical of one another's techniques, but columnist Casie Gillette suggests that perhaps they just aren't seeing the larger picture. The post What Makes A Good SEO Program "Good"? appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

04 Aug 2015 1:37pm GMT

Three Must-Download Remarketing Lists To Use With Your Search Ads

The ability to use Google Analytics to create Remarketing Lists for Search Ads was recently announced. Columnist and Googler Matt Lawson runs down the audience lists you need to import into your account. The post Three Must-Download Remarketing Lists To Use With Your Search Ads appeared first on...

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

04 Aug 2015 1:07pm GMT

feedHome - SearchEngineWatch

3 Simple Ways to Ensure Your SEO Strategy Isn’t Going Stale

The next time you have some extra time, reviewing your key landing pages and revisiting your long-tail keyword strategy are productive ways you can keep your SEO efforts up-to-date.

04 Aug 2015 11:30am GMT

The Other Secure Search Issue: When to Use HTTPS

Google strongly encourages HTTPS for its potential to make the Internet safer. You should consider the nature of your site before making the costly transition from HTTP.

04 Aug 2015 10:30am GMT

03 Aug 2015

feedGoogle Operating System

YouTube's New Desktop Player, Available for Everyone

After a few months of testing, the new desktop player for YouTube replaces the old one. The new HTML5 video player uses a transparent control bar that hides when you're not using it and has new buttons and dropdown menus.


"Our new player design has a bit more polish, gets out of the way of your video playback, and scales to any screen or embed size," informs YouTube. The TestTube page no longer lets you switch back to the old player and it only shows this message: "This browser is using the new YouTube player".


{ via YouTube }

03 Aug 2015 11:21pm GMT

Delete Recommendation History in Google Play Music

Google Play Music's desktop site has a new feature that lets you delete history. At the bottom of the settings page, there's a new section called "delete recommendation history". According to Google, this "removes the history used to give you recommendations and customize radio. This will not remove ratings and play counts on individual tracks."


Google shows a long list of recommended radios and albums and you can manually remove them by clicking "not interested" for each radio and album. After using the new "delete recommendation history" feature, I expected to see that all recommendations are removed and Google will start to show new suggested albums and radios based on the songs you play from now on. Unfortunately, that's not the case: Google still shows similar recommendations.

Speaking of historical data, it's surprising that Google Play Music still doesn't have a feature that shows all your recently played songs. It should be an auto playlist, just like "last added" and "thumbs up" and users should be able to export it.

{ Thanks, Camilo Moreira. }

03 Aug 2015 11:00pm GMT

feedSearch Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

SearchCap: Google Contracts SEOs, AdWords Bulk Uploader & Yahoo Acquires Polyvore

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the Web. The post SearchCap: Google Contracts SEOs, AdWords Bulk Uploader & Yahoo Acquires Polyvore appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

03 Aug 2015 9:00pm GMT

feedHome - SearchEngineWatch

Google: Right to be Forgotten? We're Not Complying

Google limits forget-me-now service to the European market only. The search behemoth says that widening this on a global scale is 'bad for the internet' and will not win support.

03 Aug 2015 3:59pm GMT

feedGoogle Operating System

Google Updates Ad Settings

Google has recently updated ad settings pages, which have a new design and more information about your options. You can still disable ads based on your interests from both Google sites and third-party sites. When you do that, you'll still see ads, but they "will not be based on data Google has associated with your Google Account, and so may be less relevant".

Until now, Google's ad settings page had 2 sections for interest-based ads on Google sites and non-Google sites. Google changed this: there are now separate pages for signed-in ads and signed-out ads. When you are signed in to a Google account, Google can use data associated with your account: Google search history, YouTube history, Google+ profile, manually added interests and more.



The section for signed-out ads has 2 separate settings for "ads based on your interests on websites beyond google.com" and "Google Search Ads based on your interests". Google uses your previous searches and browsing history to improve search ads, but you can disable this feature. AdSense ads also use your browsing history and anonymous demographic details to improve ads. Signed-out ads rely on cookies tied to anonymous data.


"You can control the ads that are delivered to you based on anonymous information by editing these settings. These ads will more likely be useful and relevant to you and your Google services, such as search," informs Google.



Google's help center has more information. "To opt out of all of Google's interest-based ads on your browser, you'll need to opt out in 3 places: once when you're signed in to Google products, once when you're signed out, and once for ads on the Display Network ('websites beyond google.com'). The reason for the different opt-outs is that Google uses different information to target ads, depending on how you're interacting with Google and whether you're signed in with your Google account."

{ Thanks, Herin Maru. }

03 Aug 2015 2:30pm GMT

29 Jul 2015

feedOfficial Google Blog

Five ways we’re celebrating the Special Olympics and #ADA25

"Let me win. But if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt." -Special Olympics Athlete Oath

Standing in Soldier Field in Chicago, 47 years ago, Eunice Shriver kicked off the first Special Olympics in history--1,000 people with intellectual disabilities from the U.S. and Canada competed in track & field, swimming and diving. Even though it was a small inaugural event, its historical impact--giving a platform to the civil rights struggles of people with disabilities that were so often overlooked-- was massive. The Games were meant to give children with cognitive disabilities, in Eunice's words, "the chance to play, the chance to compete and the chance to grow."

Ambitious, inclusive thinking like Eunice's is contagious, and has inspired us to support this year's Special Olympics World Games as part of the Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities. Launched in May, this effort is focused on supporting the development of assistive technologies for people with disabilities around the world with $20 million in Google.org grants. This weekend, to mark the Games as well as the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, landmark legislation that advanced the civil rights of people with disabilities when it was signed into law in 1990, we're honoring the community in the following ways:

Google Doodle featuring a track and athletes inspired by the Special Olympics



Google Doodle. We've created a homepage Doodle that shows a track inspired by the Special Olympics World Games' "circle of inclusion," featuring athletes of all backgrounds. In the spirit of getting moving, since we've heard from users that they love seeing doodles on the go, we're now starting to make them easier to see and share on our mobile search results in addition to desktop and the Google app.

Special Olympics World Games Los Angeles 2015 logo


Special Olympics World Games. Over the next nine days, the Special Olympics World Games will draw more than half a million spectators to cheer on 7,000 athletes from 177 countries in events from judo to powerlifting to kayaking and more. We're powering the World Games' social media nerve center, contributing as a financial supporter and are packing more than 300 Googlers into the stands.

Supporters hold signs to cheer on athletes


Cheer an athlete. If you're in Los Angeles, come visit us from July 25 until August 2 at the World Games Festival Space at USC's Alumni Park to support the athletes. For those who can't make it in person, you can visit g.co/WorldGames2015 to send a cheer to the athletes. Every day during the competition, we'll decorate the dorm walls of the athletes with your cheers to encourage them to "be brave in the attempt."

Portrait installation on the stairs at the National Portrait Gallery
Portraits, like these at the National Portrait Gallery featuring leaders Judy Heumann and Ed Roberts, who have campaigned tirelessly for the rights of people with disabilities and Tatyana McFadden, who inspires athletes today, will decorate Washington, D.C. this weekend. See the photo gallery

Painting the town. In Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, we're marking the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. From men and women like Judy Heumann and Ed Roberts, who campaigned tirelessly for the rights of people with disabilities, to President George H.W. Bush, who signed the ADA into law in 1990, we're telling the stories of 10 great leaders who have fought -- and continue to fight -- for equal rights of people living with disabilities. We've installed massive portraits on the stairs of historic landmarks around the nation's capital and in L.A.'s Grand Park.



Audio description available here

Telling stories. We're featuring the little-known history of a number of unsung heroes of the ADA movement at g.co/ADA. While people with disabilities benefit from their hard-won battles with every curb cut street corner and closed-caption film, their names are not widely known. We'd like to change that.

Posted by Jacquelline Fuller, Director Google.org

29 Jul 2015 8:23pm GMT

See the world in your language with Google Translate

The Google Translate app already lets you instantly visually translate printed text in seven languages. Just open the app, click on the camera, and point it at the text you need to translate-a street sign, ingredient list, instruction manual, dials on a washing machine. You'll see the text transform live on your screen into the other language. No Internet connection or cell phone data needed.

Today, we're updating the Google Translate app again-expanding instant visual translation to 20 more languages (for a total of 27!), and making real-time voice translations a lot faster and smoother-so even more people can experience the world in their language.

Instantly translate printed text in 27 languages

We started out with seven languages-English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish-and today we're adding 20 more. You can now translate to and from English and Bulgarian, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Filipino, Finnish, Hungarian, Indonesian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Romanian, Slovak, Swedish, Turkish and Ukrainian. You can also do one-way translations from English to Hindi and Thai. (Or, try snapping a pic of the text you'd like translated-we have a total of 37 languages in camera mode.)

To try out the new languages, go to the Google Translate app, set "English" along with the language you'd like to translate, and click the camera button; you'll be prompted to download a small (~2 MB) language pack for each.

Ready to see all of these languages in action?


And how exactly did we get so many new languages running on a device with no data connection? It's all about convolutional neural networks (whew)-geek out on that over on our Research blog.

Have a natural, smoother conversation-even with a slower mobile network
In many emerging markets, slow mobile networks can make it challenging to access many online tools - so if you live in an area with unreliable mobile networks, our other update today is for you. In addition to instant visual translation, we've also improved our voice conversation mode (enabling real-time translation of conversations across 32 languages), so it's even faster and more natural on slow networks.

These updates are coming to both Android and iOS, rolling out over the next few days.

Translate Community helps us get better every day
On top of today's updates, we're also continuously working to improve the quality of the translations themselves and to add new languages. A year ago this week, we launched Translate Community, a place for multilingual people from anywhere in the world to provide and correct translations. Thanks to the millions of language lovers who have already pitched in-more than 100 million words so far!-we've been updating our translations for over 90 language pairs, and plan to update many more as our community grows.

We've still got lots of work to do: more than half of the content on the Internet is in English, but only around 20% of the world's population speaks English. Today's updates knock down a few more language barriers, helping you communicate better and get the information you need.

Posted by Barak Turovsky, Product Lead, Google Translate

29 Jul 2015 1:12pm GMT

27 Jul 2015

feedOfficial Google Blog

Everything in its right place

When we launched Google+, we set out to help people discover, share and connect across Google like they do in real life. While we got certain things right, we made a few choices that, in hindsight, we've needed to rethink. So over the next few months, we're going to be making some important changes. Here's more about what you can expect:

A more focused Google+ experience
Google+ is quickly becoming a place where people engage around their shared interests, with the content and people who inspire them. In line with that focus, we're continuing to add new features like Google+ Collections, where you can share and enjoy posts organized by the topics you care about. At the same time, we'll also move some features that aren't essential to an interest-based social experience out of Google+. For example, many elements of Google+ Photos have been moved into the new Google Photos app, and we're well underway putting location sharing into Hangouts and other apps, where it really belongs. We think changes like these will lead to a more focused, more useful, more engaging Google+.

Using Google without a Google+ profile
People have told us that accessing all of their Google stuff with one account makes life a whole lot easier. But we've also heard that it doesn't make sense for your Google+ profile to be your identity in all the other Google products you use.

So in the coming months, a Google Account will be all you'll need to share content, communicate with contacts, create a YouTube channel and more, all across Google. YouTube will be one of the first products to make this change, and you can learn more on their blog. As always, your underlying Google Account won't be searchable or followable, unlike public Google+ profiles. And for people who already created Google+ profiles but don't plan to use Google+ itself, we'll offer better options for managing and removing those public profiles.

You'll see these changes roll out in stages over several months. While they won't happen overnight, they're right for Google's users-both the people who are on Google+ every single day, and the people who aren't.

Posted by Bradley Horowitz, VP of Streams, Photos, and Sharing

27 Jul 2015 4:00pm GMT

09 Apr 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Berkshire Hathaway

My taste in financial advice runs toward the simple and the lessons I've learned the hard way. But I still like reading about investing/finance, and I recently read through the 2014 annual report for Berkshire Hathaway. Given that it was the 50th anniversary of Warren Buffett taking charge of Berkshire, I have to admit that […]

09 Apr 2015 6:47am GMT

01 Apr 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

My next project: AutoSEO

This was an April Fool's joke. I've been working really hard with some friends on a project to handle SEO automatically. Now we're ready to take the wraps off it over at seo.ninja. One of the ideas that helped the World Wide Web succeed was that it separated presentation and content. You could write your […]

01 Apr 2015 12:23am GMT

01 Mar 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Next 30 day challenge: social media/news cleanse

For January 2015, I tried to declutter around the house for 15 minutes a day. We now have a couple rooms that are much cleaner, and I gave away a bunch of magazines. For February 2015, my 30 day challenge was to go on daily 15 minute walks with my wife. That was nice. Lately […]

01 Mar 2015 4:40am GMT

26 Aug 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

The Emperor's Garden

The Emperor instructed the gardener to set up the new court's garden. "I want you to plant five trees growing the Crataan fruit," the Emperor said, "Because we asked people what fruit they like best, and most named the Crataan fruit!" The gardener replied, "Emperor, that is excellent thinking! But let me make some suggestions: First, how about we make one of the five trees bear the Muran fruit. Only one out of ten citizens loves it, but those peculiar citizens tend to love multiple times as much!" "Second," the gardener continued, "How about we make one of the five trees bear the Dratean fruit. No one loves it, but that's because no one knows it yet!" "Third," the gardener said, "How about we leave one spot in the garden empty. Who knows what new type of tree we'll discover that we can put there in the fut ...

26 Aug 2011 12:12pm GMT

15 Aug 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Color Sound Machine (and what else I've been doing lately)

For those of you who've been wondering whether I had turned to stone, fallen into a bottomless pit, or been climbing the Himalaya... no, none of that is true, even though you probably did notice I'm not actively blogging about Google here anymore*! Just now, a new iPad app I've been working on called Color Sound Machine went live, and this -- and all the other apps and games at Versus Pad** -- are actually what I am doing while not blogoscoping. *I've drafted unpublished posts explaining much more about past, present and future of Blogoscoped, and the history of Google news reporting, but ... oh, for now le ...

15 Aug 2011 4:00pm GMT

25 Feb 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Google drops reverse phone number lookup

One of the earliest specialist services provided by Google was reverse phone number lookup. If you used the "phonebook:" or "rphonebook:" operators together with a 10-digit US phone number, Google would show you the owner of that phone number, unless the number was unlisted. Google no longer provides that service. Not surprisingly, there was no press release marking the closure, but Google employee Daniel Russell has acknowledged the closure of the service in his blog. He hints at the possible pressures leading to the shuttering of the service: "As you can imagine, this was an endless source of hassles for people (who were surprised to see themselves searchable on Google) and for Google (who had to constantly de ...

25 Feb 2011 11:23am GMT