07 Dec 2016

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Plex for Android update brings support for adoptable storage in V 5.2

Now that the days are getting colder and vacation time is almost upon us, a lot of people will probably be holed up in their respective houses with their respective devices and streaming services, binge watching the shows they've missed or included in their to be watched list. That's why apps like Plex for Android […]

07 Dec 2016 6:00pm GMT

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TouchWiz gets rebranded as Samsung Experience in latest Nougat beta firmware for Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge

Samsung opened up its Galaxy Beta Program back in November for the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge, allowing those who signed up to test its beta Nougat firmware ahead of an official release. The electronics giant is rolling out the third update for those enrolled in the program, and it comes with some interesting changes, […]


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07 Dec 2016 5:15pm GMT

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Fly high this holiday season with the world’s smallest camera drone [DEALS]

Discover just how much fun you can have with the ultra-small, precision controlled, and camera equipped SKEYE Nano 2 First-Person View Drone, offered for $30 off the retail price for readers of Android Community. In case you're wondering, this makes a great holiday gift - and if you buy one today, you'll ensure it ships […]

07 Dec 2016 5:00pm GMT

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Pebble officially leaves the smartwatch market after Fitbit acquisition

Pebble was a pioneer in the smartwatch market, thriving off of Kickstarter success and a brand new device category. The original Pebble had its shortcomings, but it was one of the first actual smartwatches you could buy, and it wasn't crazy expensive. The Pebble Time refined the watch by giving it a sleeker design and […]


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07 Dec 2016 4:30pm GMT

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Pokemon GO for Android receives another minor update

We have no confirmation yet about the Starbucks Pokemon GO event supposedly for tomorrow, December 8, but the augmented reality has just received another update. That's right. You can update your Pokemon GO once again this week to version 0.49.1. The update isn't only for Android users as Niantic Labs also released the same for […]

07 Dec 2016 4:00pm GMT

Samsung’s multi-million pay-out to Apple overturned, case being reassessed

Some good news in the direction of Samsung-it's pay-out to Apple for copying has been overturned. We're not saying Samsung really did copy the iPhone design but that's the reason why the South Korean tech giant needs to pay the Cupertino company $400 million in damages. The decision is overturned in the United States and […]

07 Dec 2016 3:00pm GMT

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Google rolling out Duo 5.0 with major video quality improvements

When Google released their brand new video chat app Duo this Fall, they aimed to provide an experience that was simple and could provide uninterrupted and good quality video and audio regardless of your location or connection strength. And with downloads on Android hovering around the 10 million mark, it shows that if nothing else […]


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07 Dec 2016 2:52pm GMT

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Latest Galaxy S8 rumors point to stereo speakers, Harman branding

Since we're supposedly just a few months away from the announcement of the Samsung Galaxy S8 (at least, we assume that's still the name), the rumor mill just keeps churning out all sorts of "leaked information" and speculation about the upcoming flagship. The latest round of rumors concerns the audio-related features for the device, which […]

07 Dec 2016 2:00pm GMT

Samsung Galaxy S8 won’t have a headphone jack, 2K resolution retained

No headphone jack. Three words that somehow tell us of the direction a company is taking: it wants to be revolutionary. This isn't the first time we're hearing of a 3.5mm jack removed from the phone. There's the Moto Z, three LeEco phones (Le 2, Le 2 Pro, and Le Max 2), HTC Bolt, and […]

07 Dec 2016 1:00pm GMT

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Google is making Android app updates a whole lot smaller

Tired of spending a large chunk of your monthly data on Android updates? Well, good news! Google has come up with a way to drastically reduce the file size of updates by introducing file-by-file patching. Details after the break. This is, technically, a much more efficient way to handle patching. By doing it file-by-file, users […]


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07 Dec 2016 1:00pm GMT

Google Now gets its own news feed in new update

Your Google Now cards are about to get a little different, as Google is now integrating its own news feed inside Google Now. Details after the break. With this new integration, your Google Now cards will be split into two different sections - Feed and Upcoming. Feed is fairly self-explanatory. It's basically an aggregation of […]


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07 Dec 2016 12:00pm GMT

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Starbucks Pokemon GO event leaked, rumored for tomorrow December 8

Want a new Pokemon to go with that cup of coffee? That sounds weird but looks like Starbucks has teamed up with Niantic to come up with a new promo that will help market the game further. Some people are already losing interest but perhaps making them go to a nearby Starbucks to catch a […]

07 Dec 2016 12:00pm GMT

Pebble Time 2, Core could be cancelled due to Fitbit acquisition

Rumors have been flying for the past few days that wearable company FitBit will be acquiring smartwatch pioneer Pebble. No response has been forthcoming from both companies as of this writing, but according to various sources, the deal is almost done, but it's not for the entire operation, but just for Pebble's software assets. The […]

07 Dec 2016 11:00am GMT

Shiny Pokemon might be making an appearance in Pokemon GO soon

For fans of the original Pokemon game and TV series, the news that some shiny and rare colors might be making an appearance in the Pokemon GO game will probably fill them with excitement. Niantic, which develops the game for Nintendo, still have not confirmed the existence of the Shiny Pokemon, but insiders and some […]

07 Dec 2016 3:30am GMT

Allo now supports Brazilian Portuguese, Hindi for Google Assistant

Google Assistant has been pretty handy for heavy Google users, particularly those using the Allo messaging app. In fact, one in every 12 messages have used its assistance when in group chats within Allo. However, most of the features are of course in English. That is, until now. Google has announced that they are adding […]

07 Dec 2016 3:00am GMT

FlowMotion ONE aims to brings shaky videos to a stable end

You love live streaming videos on Facebook Live but you kinda give your audience vertigo due to your shaky camera work. You enjoy taking a lot of adventure and travel videos but it looks amateurish because of the constant bumps and shakes. There are several mobile device stabilizers available in the market to help you […]

07 Dec 2016 2:00am GMT

Meizu H1 Band launched as an affordable health and fitness tracker

Meizu has finally joined the wearable game. The Chinese OEM has just launched the Meizu H1 Band. This device is very affordable but it works exactly like the Fitbit simply because it has the latter's features and functions. It's only $33 (¥229) so you know a lot of people can afford it. The Meizu H1 […]

07 Dec 2016 1:30am GMT

Meizu announces new M5 Note with 5.5-inch Full HD screen, 4000mAh battery

Aside from the H1 Band, Meizu also introduced a new smartphone in the form of the M5 Note. This new addition to the M Series is something we've been waiting for since the Meizu M5 was introduced in China last month. This phone is a better variant of the M5 with its 5.5-inch Full HD […]

07 Dec 2016 1:00am GMT

Blink shows off Outdoor Security Camera with compatible app

A new outdoor security cam has just been announced-meet the Blink Outdoor Security Camera. This one can very well rival the Nest Cam Outdoor because of its usefulness and value for money. Officially called as the Blink XT camera, this product boasts of being waterproof so you know it can withstand the rain and other […]

07 Dec 2016 12:00am GMT

06 Dec 2016

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Dual-screen Hisense A2 phone sighted on TENAA

Dual-screen smartphones are nothing new. We've seen the YotaPhone before but that one didn't have any follow-up. The last we heard was that Yota received a multimillion dollar investment for production last year. Just before the year ends, we're seeing something similar but this time, from a company more known for TVs. Chinese OEM HiSense […]

06 Dec 2016 11:00pm GMT

WINE and Crossover may bring Windows apps to Android soon

Most people who use WINE will tell you it's not an emulator, it's just a software layer that you run on Linux or Mac operating systems to allow you to run some applications designed and programmed for Microsoft's Windows OS. We've seen developers have some progress in doing the same thing for Android devices through […]

06 Dec 2016 10:00pm GMT

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[Deal] Take up to $40 off the Moto G4 through Thursday morning

Maybe you're shopping for a new phone that isn't hundreds of dollars? You better take advantage of this deal on a new Moto G4 from Lenovo. It's a discount that's only valid for 48 hours. Now through Thursday morning, the Moto G4 is eligible for up to $40 off. The 16GB model is now $179 […]


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06 Dec 2016 8:48pm GMT

Samsung is releasing custom watch bands exclusively for the Gear S3

When talking about smartwatches, it's easy to forget that they're more than just extensions of a smartphone. They offer a ton of useful electronic functionality, but they're still watches, and watches are fashion accessories. Samsung is taking advantage of that fact and releasing a handful of new bands for their Gear S3 to mix and […]


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06 Dec 2016 8:30pm GMT

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Saving Data: Reducing the size of App Updates by 65%

Posted by Andrew Hayden, Software Engineer on Google Play

Android users are downloading tens of billions of apps and games on Google Play. We're also seeing developers update their apps frequently in order to provide users with great content, improve security, and enhance the overall user experience. It takes a lot of data to download these updates and we know users care about how much data their devices are using. Earlier this year, we announced that we started using the bsdiff algorithm (by Colin Percival). Using bsdiff, we were able to reduce the size of app updates on average by 47% compared to the full APK size.

Today, we're excited to share a new approach that goes further - File-by-File patching.App Updates using File-by-File patching are, on average, 65% smaller than the full app, and in some cases more than 90% smaller.

The savings, compared to our previous approach, add up to 6 petabytes of user data saved per day!

In order to get the new version of the app, Google Play sends your device a patch that describes the differences between the old and new versions of the app.

Imagine you are an author of a book about to be published, and wish to change a single sentence - it's much easier to tell the editor which sentence to change and what to change, rather than send an entirely new book. In the same way, patches are much smaller and much faster to download than the entire APK.

Techniques used in File-by-File patching

Android apps are packaged as APKs, which are ZIP files with special conventions. Most of the content within the ZIP files (and APKs) is compressed using a technology called Deflate. Deflate is really good at compressing data but it has a drawback: it makes identifying changes in the original (uncompressed) content really hard. Even a tiny change to the original content (like changing one word in a book) can make the compressed output of deflate look completely different. Describing the differences between the original content is easy, but describing the differences between the compressed content is so hard that it leads to inefficient patches.

Watch how much the compressed text on the right side changes from a one-letter change in the uncompressed text on the left:

File-by-File therefore is based on detecting changes in the uncompressed data. To generate a patch, we first decompress both old and new files before computing the delta (we still use bsdiff here). Then to apply the patch, we decompress the old file, apply the delta to the uncompressed content and then recompress the new file. In doing so, we need to make sure that the APK on your device is a perfect match, byte for byte, to the one on the Play Store (see APK Signature Schema v2 for why).

When recompressing the new file, we hit two complications. First, Deflate has a number of settings that affect output; and we don't know which settings were used in the first place. Second, many versions of deflate exist and we need to know whether the version on your device is suitable.

Fortunately, after analysis of the apps on the Play Store, we've discovered that recent and compatible versions of deflate based on zlib (the most popular deflate library) account for almost all deflated content in the Play Store. In addition, the default settings (level=6) and maximum compression settings (level=9) are the only settings we encountered in practice.

Knowing this, we can detect and reproduce the original deflate settings. This makes it possible to uncompress the data, apply a patch, and then recompress the data back to exactly the same bytes as originally uploaded.

However, there is one trade off; extra processing power is needed on the device. On modern devices (e.g. from 2015), recompression can take a little over a second per megabyte and on older or less powerful devices it can be longer. Analysis so far shows that, on average, if the patch size is halved then the time spent applying the patch (which for File-by-File includes recompression) is doubled.

For now, we are limiting the use of this new patching technology to auto-updates only, i.e. the updates that take place in the background, usually at night when your phone is plugged into power and you're not likely to be using it. This ensures that users won't have to wait any longer than usual for an update to finish when manually updating an app.

How effective is File-by-File Patching?

Here are examples of app updates already using File-by-File Patching:


Application
Original Size
Previous (BSDiff) Patch Size
(% vs original)
File-by-File Patch Size (% vs original)
71.1 MB
13.4 MB (-81%)
8.0 MB (-89%)
32.7 MB
17.5 MB (-46%)
9.6 MB (-71%)
17.8 MB
7.6 MB (-57%)
7.3 MB (-59%)
18.9 MB
17.2 MB (-9%)
13.1 MB (-31%)
52.4 MB
19.1 MB (-64%)
8.4 MB (-84%)
16.2 MB
7.7 MB (-52%)
1.2 MB (-92%)


Disclaimer: if you see different patch sizes when you press "update" manually, that is because we are not currently using File-by-file for interactive updates, only those done in the background.

Saving data and making our users (& developers!) happy

These changes are designed to ensure our community of over a billion Android users use as little data as possible for regular app updates. The best thing is that as a developer you don't need to do anything. You get these reductions to your update size for free!

If you'd like to know more about File-by-File patching, including the technical details, head over to the Archive Patcher GitHub project where you can find information, including the source code. Yes, File-by-File patching is completely open-source!

As a developer if you're interested in reducing your APK size still further, here are some general tips on reducing APK size.

06 Dec 2016 8:06pm GMT

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Instagram fine tunes safety and privacy controls

Instagram has always tried to give users some control over their privacy and safety on the social photo-sharing site, including doing things like giving users the abilities to filter comments with certain keywords. They're taking that a few steps further with a few new tools set to come to Instagram going forward. If comment filtering wasn't […]


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06 Dec 2016 6:45pm GMT

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: Best for the home

Now's the time of year where you're shopping for gifts, but it could get difficult if your friends and family are picky or your budget is a little tight. So we've put together a selection of products for the home that fit different types of people and budgets of all sizes. The home is a […]


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06 Dec 2016 5:45pm GMT

U.S. Supreme Court sides with Samsung, nullifies $399 million payment to Apple

It was a unanimous ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States favoring Samsung in a lawsuit with Apple that began in 2011. All eight justices sitting on the U.S. Supreme Court's bench agreed that Samsung should not be required to pay every penny from the profits of the eleven patent-infringing devices. Both the […]


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06 Dec 2016 5:09pm GMT

05 Dec 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Welcoming Android 7.1.1 Nougat

Posted by Dave Burke, VP of Engineering

Android Nougat

Android 7.1.1 Nougat!

Today we're rolling out an update to Nougat -- Android 7.1.1 for Pixel and Pixel XL devices and the full lineup of supported Nexus devices. We're also pushing the Android 7.1.1 source code to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) so that device makers can get their hands on the latest version of Android.

With Android 7.1.1 officially on it's way to users, it's a good time to make sure your apps are ready.

What's in Android 7.1.1?

Android 7.1.1 is an incremental release that builds on the features already available on Pixel and Pixel XL devices, adding a handful of new features for consumers as well as optimizations and bug fixes on top of the base Android 7.1 platform (API level 25).

If you haven't explored the developer features, you'll want to take a look at app shortcuts, round icon resources, and image keyboard support, among others -- you can see the full list of developer features here. For details on API Level 25, check out the API diffs and the API reference.

You can find an overview of all of the Android Nougat developer resources here, including details on the core Android 7.0 Nougat behavior changes and developer features.c

Coming to consumer devices soon

We're starting the Android 7.1.1 rollout today, and we expect it to reach all eligible devices over the next several weeks. Pixel and Pixel XL devices will get the over-the-air (OTA) update, as will Nexus 5X, Nexus 6P, Nexus 6, Nexus 9, Nexus Player, Pixel C, and General Mobile 4G (Android One) devices. Devices enrolled in the Android Beta Program will receive the final version as well. As always, you can also download and flash this update manually.

We've also been working with our device manufacturer partners to bring Android 7.1.1 to their devices in the months ahead.

Make sure your apps are ready

Take this opportunity to test your apps for compatibility and optimize them to look their best on Android 7.1.1, such as by providing round icons and adding app shortcuts. We recommend compiling your app with, and ideally targeting, API 25. See our recent post for details.

With the final platform we're updating the platform and build tools in Android Studio, as well as the API Level 25 emulator system images. The latest version of the support library (25.0.1) is also available for you to add image keyboard support, bottom navigation, and other features for devices running API Level 25 or earlier.

We're also providing downloadable factory and OTA images on the Nexus Images page to help you do final testing on your Pixel and Nexus devices. To help scale your testing, make sure to take advantage of Firebase Test Lab for Android and run your tests in the cloud at no charge through the end of December.

After your final testing, publish your apps to your alpha, beta, or production channels in the Google Play Developer Console.

What's next?

We'll soon be closing open bugs logged against Developer Preview builds, but please keep the feedback coming! If you still see an issue that you filed in the preview tracker, just file a new issue against Android 7.1 in the AOSP issue tracker. You can also continue to give us feedback or ask questions in the developer community.

As mentioned back in August, we've moved Android Nougat into a regular maintenance cycle and we're already started work on refinements and bug fixes for the next incremental update. If you have an eligible device that's currently enrolled in the Android Beta Program, your device will automatically receive preview updates of upcoming Android Nougat releases as soon as they are available. If you don't want to receive those updates, just visit the Beta site and unenroll the device.

Thanks for being part of the developer preview. Let us know how this year's preview met your needs by taking a short survey. Your feedback helps to shape our future releases.

05 Dec 2016 7:23pm GMT

01 Dec 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Indie game developers in Latin America sustain growth after launch on Google Play

Posted by Kacey Fahey, Marketing Programs Manager, Google Play

Indie game developers are some of the most exciting and innovative teams to work with. While developers large and small exist on the same field, gone are the days where you hit publish and turn your back, moving on to the next project. We've gathered a few developer stories coming out of Latin America sharing experiences and advice.

Oktagon Games

Ronaldo Cruz, Founder and CEO of Oktagon Games tells us how "reviews provide great qualitative insight on the game helping us identify problems that may not be caught by analytics."



Tiny Bytes

Tiny Bytes reduced churn by 5% using an in-game tutorial and analytics.


Impossible Apps

Cleverson Schmidt of Impossible Apps shares how introducing in-app purchases helps diversify revenue streams and "can make the game profitable and self sustainable."



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01 Dec 2016 8:24pm GMT

30 Nov 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Updated Udacity Android course prepares students for the Associate Android Developer Certification

Posted by Jocelyn Becker, Senior Program Manager, Android Training

As one of our most popular Udacity courses, the Developing Android Apps course was recently updated to ensure developers have the resources to build high quality apps. This course, which has already helped more than half a million developers learn to build Android apps, has been through the car wash and come out sparkling clean and updated.

Google and Udacity have worked together to update the course to include the very latest changes in Android and Android Studio, including how to use the new Constraint Layout editor, and how to use Firebase Job Dispatcher. Learn best practices for building Android apps using Android 7.0 (Nougat) while keeping your apps backwards compatible in older versions, learning at your own pace in your own time.

You sent us feedback that some of the lessons were a little difficult to get through, so we've restructured the lessons and added smaller apps for you to build as you progress through the course. So not only will you build the Sunshine weather app as a complete, integrated application that spans the entire course, but you'll also create an app in each lesson to help you learn individual concepts.

Build a To Do app and add new tasks as you learn how to build a ContentProvider.


This course brings back Android experts Dan Galpin and Reto Meier from Google, and Lyla Fujiwara from Udacity, and introduces new faces from Google and Udacity.


Start learning now at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud851.

Combined package for Developing Android Apps course and Associate Android Developer Certification

This updated course teaches the skills that are tested by the Associate Android Developer certification exam. Udacity is offering a package that combines the updated Developing Android Apps course with a voucher for the Associate Android Developer certification exam. If you pass this exam, you will earn the Associate Android Developer Certification and show that you are competent and skilled in tasks that an entry-level Android developer typically performs. Enroll in Udacity's Fast Track to get prepared and take the Associate Android developer exam at: https://www.udacity.com/course/nd818.

30 Nov 2016 5:45pm GMT

Learn tips from Memrise to increase in-app conversions with pricing experiments

Posted by Tamzin Taylor, Partner Development Manager at Google Play, & Kristina Narusk, Head of Production at Memrise

Getting people to install your app is one thing, getting them to sign up to your paid offering is quite another. It's important to understand the complete journey your users take from installing your app to paying for something. Once you do, you can experiment on the flow to try and increase conversions. Memrise has found great success in experimenting on their language learning app to increase the number of paying users.

Four experiments Memrise use to improve conversions

Memrise makes languages fun with a number of different learning modes you can play to help increase your vocabulary in a chosen language. You can download the app for free and play some of the modes or take advantage of their premium subscription offering called 'Memrise Pro' which offers new game modes and additional features like offline learning. Memrise recently ran a number of conversion experiments with the main objective of increasing the Average Revenue Per Daily Active User (ARPDAU). These experiments tested multiple user experience and pricing experiment scenarios.

1. A/B test how messaging different user benefits can impact conversion

What they did: Memrise wanted to know what motivation and call to action would convert the most users to buy a Pro subscription from a locked game mode in the app. To do this, they ran an A/B test with two similar designs, featuring different reasons for the user to upgrade, and compared the results to their original upgrade messaging.



Screen Shot 2016-10-11 at 15.26.00.png
Screen Shot 2016-10-11 at 15.25.34.png
Test A: Focus on 'difficult' words with an orange background.
Test B: Focus on 'favorite' words with a pink background.

Results: Test A performed the best. Conversion to Pro in Test A was 28% higher than in Test B. Pro mode usage was subsequently 9.7% higher in Test A compared to Test B too.

Next steps: After seeing how test A won the experiment, Memrise applied this creative across the board. Subscribers driven by that particular mode increased as a percentage of all subscriptions in the app by 16%. Memrise plans to run additional A/B tests at others points of conversion in the app to see if they can increase the results even further. They'll also try different text for the call to actions.

2. Test whether adapting to local price points results in sustainable uplift

In 2015, Google Play launched new minimum local price levels in countries around the world. To take advantage of the new price points, Memrise tested lowering localised prices in certain markets to better match purchasing power. Prices were an average of 6 times lower during this experiment.

Results: After 30 days, Memrise saw the following changes in conversions to paid users:



🇹🇷
Turkey
180%
🇧🇷
Brazil
182%
🇷🇺
Russia
99%
🇲🇽
Mexico
115%
🇮🇳
India
5.1%
🇮🇩
Indonesia
152%
🇰🇷
South Korea
120%
🇹🇭
Thailand
70%
🇲🇾
Malaysia
27%

Next steps: The change in price affected the subscription dynamics with more users taking advantage of Memrise's in-app discounted offer in most countries. The offer was for annual subscribers only and has led to a positive effect on LTV. One insight from the experiment was that Indian users prefered to have the option to subscribe in weekly or monthly increments and not just annually. Memrise is still tracking carefully to see whether the discounted subscription pricing will lead to an increase in conversions.

3. Test when and how often you offer free trials to see if that affects conversion rate

Memrise occasionally offers users, who aren't Pro subscribers, a free trial of one of the Pro game modes while cycling through the various free modes. After the free trial session, users are presented with an offer to subscribe. Memrise experimented with the offer's timing making it appear more frequently while users were cycling through normal free sessions Instead of after every 49th session, users saw the unlocked mode after every 21st session.



Screenshot_unlocked.png
Screenshot_unclocked_offer.png
An example of a free trial of a Pro mode.
After completing a free trial, users see a discounted subscription offer.

Results: Offering a free trial more frequently paid off. The conversion rate increased by 50% while all other conversion rates remained the same.

Next steps: Memrise maintained the more frequent offer cadence and has seen revenue growth as a result.

4. Test whether seasonal discounts result in more conversions Memrise launched a 'Back to School' campaign presenting all users with a discounted annual plan offer for a week in September 2016. The aim was to convert more users and generate higher value users from annual subscription plans.

Screen Shot 2016-10-11 at 16.03.14.png

Results: Memrise saw two effects from the seasonal offer. As a result of only presenting an annual period and removing weekly and monthly, 20% fewer users per day converted to Pro. However, because more people were taking an annual subscription than a shorter subscription, the average revenue per day increased by 32% justifying the change.

Next steps: Memrise plans to test different offers in the future with a combination of subscription offerings. They'll also focus offers in countries like Turkey and Mexico, where they saw the biggest increase in conversions.

Keep experimenting and take advantage of new features to improve the user experience and increase conversions

At Playtime San Francisco, we announced that introductory pricing for subscriptions would be coming soon and the feature is now live. By continually testing messaging, pricing, offers, and free trials or discounted trials, you could increase the conversions in your app and your ongoing revenue just like Memrise. Learn more about Google Play in-app billing subscriptions and get the Playbook for Developers app to stay up-to-date with features and best practices that will help you grow a successful business on Google Play.

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30 Nov 2016 3:39pm GMT

29 Nov 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Keeping it real: Improving reviews and ratings in Google Play

Posted by Andrew Ahn, Product Manager and Buddhika Kottahachchi, Product Manager

The Play Store contains the largest catalog of apps in the world. As our users make decisions about the apps they'd like to install, we want to ensure Play provides a trustworthy experience.

Recently, we announced our improvements in fighting fraudulent and spam app installs. In continuing our efforts to combat spammy behavior, we've also improved the ways we identify and remove fake reviews and ratings. With this enhanced capability we are now able to identify and remove more fake reviews and ratings with greater accuracy.

In the vast majority of cases, no action is needed. If you are working with someone else to promote your app (e.g., third-party marketing agencies), we advise you to check-in and ensure that their promotion techniques use legitimate practices, and adhere to the Google Play Developer Policy. The basic rule of thumb for reviews and ratings is that they should come from genuine users, and developers should not attempt to manipulate them in any form (e.g., fake, paid, incentivized).

We will continue making such enhancements to our systems that will further help protect the integrity of Google Play, our developer community, and ultimately our end users.

29 Nov 2016 5:49pm GMT

Android Developer Story: Le Monde increases subscriptions with Google Play Billing

Watch Edouard Andrieu, Director of Mobile, and Ahcene Amrouz, Product Manager for Mobile, explain how La Matinale has a 6% higher subscription conversion on Android than on other platforms thanks to tools like Google Play Billing.

Learn more how to add an introductory price to your subscription, and get the News Publisher Playbook to stay up-to-date with more features and best practices to help you find success for your news apps on Google Play.


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29 Nov 2016 5:12pm GMT

23 Nov 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Your next growth market: Realizing the potential of MENA

Posted by Mohammad El-Saadi, BD, Google Play

We know that many developers want to take advantage of growth opportunities in new regions, but are held back by not knowing the most important areas to focus on. That's why we wanted to share stories from our partners in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). It's a fast growing region for Google Play, and one that already represents a sizable revenue opportunity. They've shared their experiences, and some key things to focus on if you're thinking of launching in the region.

Middle East and North Africa overview

MENA is a diverse region in terms of disposable income, access to connectivity, and smartphone penetration. However, it is possible to broadly group MENA into two types of market:

Growth markets

Emerging markets

Opportunities

Localization

If you want to be successful in MENA, localization is key. In Saudi Arabia 19 of the top 20 grossing apps & games have their Google Play Store listing localized and the majority of those have their actual app/game localized as well. By localizing to Arabic, mobile app and game developers have found great success in the region.

When Singapore-based Wego.com localized to Arabic, they achieved over 200% YoY growth in MENA, grew their app rating from 3.5 to over 4.5 among Arab travelers and increased Arab users' retention rates by 200%. Today, MENA represents over 65% of their users.

To do localization well, here are a few things to consider:

Refer to our Localization Checklist for some best practices when localizing for any language.

Gaming

Gaming is a high growth and revenue opportunity in MENA. Most countries in the region have a median age of 30 or lower, smartphone growth will continue to grow at double digits, which makes gaming a key segment for users in the region. Today's local top grossing charts and dominated by Midcore strategy games. Interestingly, GCC countries have some of the highest Average Revenue Per Paying User rates globally.

International titles, including Clash of Clans, Clash Royale, Mobile Strike and Clash of Kings, have performed incredibly well in the region. In addition, titles specifically targeting MENA have also seen tremendous success. Revenge of the Sultans, by ONEMT, from China, has been the top grossing title across several MENA countries for many months. Similarly, when IGG.com launched the Arabic version of Castle Clash, they grew revenue from MENA by 58% within 4 months.

As the market evolves, there is also a huge opportunity for other genres (such as RPG, FPS, and sports) which are not present at scale in the region yet.

Google Play in MENA

We continue to invest in making sure that users are able to pay for their favorite apps and games by launching locally relevant payment methods in MENA. Today, we have carrier billing available with the major networks in Saudi Arabia, UAE and Kuwait. We plan to expand coverage in more countries, including Qatar and Bahrain, in the future.

We are also committed to increasing the quality and availability of Arabic apps and games for MENA users, which is why we launched our Now in Arabic collectionfeaturing apps and games that have recently localized to Arabic. This collection will be regularly updated. If you're interested in being included, submit your localized app/game.

23 Nov 2016 6:08pm GMT

22 Nov 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Final update to Android 7.1 Developer Preview

Posted by Dave Burke, VP of Engineering

Today we're rolling out an update to the Android 7.1 Developer Preview -- the last before we release the final Android 7.1.1 platform to the ecosystem. Android 7.1.1 includes the developer features already available on Pixel and Pixel XL devices and adds optimizations and bug fixes on top of the base Android 7.1 platform. With Developer Preview 2, you can make sure your apps are ready for Android 7.1.1 and the consumers that will soon be running it on their devices.

As highlighted in October, we're also expanding the range of devices that can receive this Developer Preview update to Nexus 5X, Nexus 6P, Nexus 9, and Pixel C.

If you have a supported device that's enrolled in the Android Beta Program, you'll receive an update to Developer Preview 2 over the coming week. If you haven't enrolled your device yet, just visit the site to enroll your device and get the update.

In early December, we'll roll out Android 7.1.1 to the full lineup of supported devices as well as Pixel and Pixel XL devices.

What's in this update?

Developer Preview 2 is a release candidate for Android 7.1.1 that you can use to complete your app development and testing in preparation for the upcoming final release. In includes near-final system behaviors and UI, along with the latest bug fixes and optimizations across the system and Google apps.

It also includes the developer features and APIs (API level 25) already introduced in Developer Preview 1. If you haven't explored the developer features, you'll want to take a look at app shortcuts, round icon resources, and image keyboard support, among others -- you can see the full list of developer features here.

With Developer Preview 2, we're also updating the SDK build and platform tools in Android Studio, the Android 7.1.1 platform, and the API Level 25 emulator system images. The latest version of the support library (25.0.1) is also available for you to add image keyboard support, bottom navigation, and other features for devices running API Level 25 or earlier.

For details on API Level 25 check out the API diffs and the updated API reference on the developer preview site.

Get your apps ready for Android 7.1

Now is the time to optimize your apps to look their best on Android 7.1.1. To get started, update to Android Studio 2.2.2 and then download the API Level 25 platform, emulator system images, and tools through the SDK Manager in Android Studio.

After installing the API Level 25 SDK, you can update your project's compileSdkVersion to 25 to build and test against the new APIs. If you're doing compatibility testing, we recommend updating your app's targetSdkVersion to 25 to test your app with compatibility behaviors disabled. For details on how to set up your app with the API Level 25 SDK, see Set up the Preview.

If you're adding app shortcuts or circular launcher icons to your app, you can use Android Studio's built-in Image Asset Studio to quickly help you create icons of different sizes that meet the material design guidelines. You can test your round icons on the Google APIs emulator for API Level 25, which includes support for round icons and the new Google Pixel Launcher.


Android Studio and the Google APIs emulator let you quickly create and test your round icon assets.

If you're adding image keyboard support, you can use the Messenger and Google Keyboard apps included in the preview system images for testing as they include support for this new API.

Scale your tests using Firebase Test Lab for Android

To help scale your testing, make sure to take advantage of Firebase Test Lab for Android and run your tests in the cloud at no charge during the preview period on all virtual devices including the Developer Preview 2 (API 25). You can use the automated crawler (Robo Test) to test your app without having to write any test scripts, or you can upload your own instrumentation (e.g. Espresso) tests. You can upload your tests here.

Publish your apps to alpha, beta or production channels in Google Play

After you've finished final testing, you can publish your updates compiled against, and optionally targeting, API 25 to Google Play. You can publish to your alpha, beta, or even production channels in the Google Play Developer Console. In this way, push your app updates to users whose devices are running Android 7.1, such as Pixel and Android Beta devices.

Get Developer Preview 2 on Your Eligible Device

If you have an eligible device that's already enrolled in the Android Beta Program, the device will get the Developer Preview 2 update over the coming week. No action is needed on your part. If you aren't yet enrolled in program, the easiest way to get started is by visiting android.com/beta and opt-in your eligible Android phone or tablet -- you'll soon receive this preview update over-the-air. As always, you can also download and flash this update manually.

As mentioned above, this Developer Preview update is available for Nexus 5X, Nexus 6P, Nexus 9, and Pixel C devices.

We're expecting to launch the final release of the Android 7.1.1 in just a few weeks Starting in December, we'll roll out Android 7.1.1 to the full lineup of supported preview devices, as well as the recently launched Pixel and Pixel XL devices. At that time, we'll also push the sources to AOSP, so our device manufacturer partners can bring this new platform update to consumers on their devices.

Meanwhile, we continue to welcome your feedback in the Developer Preview issue tracker, N Preview Developer community, or Android Beta community as we work towards the final consumer release in December!

22 Nov 2016 6:14pm GMT

Calling European game developers, enter the Indie Games Contest by December 31

Originally posted on Google Developers blog

Posted by Matteo Vallone, Google Play Games Business Development

To build awareness of the awesome innovation and art that indie game developers are bringing to users on Google Play, we have invested heavily over the past year in programs like Indie Corner, as well as events like the Google Play Indie Games Festivals in North America and Korea.

As part of that sustained effort, we also want to celebrate the passion and innovation of indie game developers with the introduction of the first-ever Google Play Indie Games Contest in Europe. The contest will recognize the best indie talent in several countries and offer prizes that will help you get your game noticed by industry experts and gamers worldwide.

Prizes for the finalists and winners:

Entering the contest:

If you're based in Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France (coming soon), Germany, Iceland, Israel, Netherlands, Norway, Poland (coming soon), Romania, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, or UK (excl. Northern Ireland), have 15 or less full time employees, and published a new game on Google Play after 1 January 2016, you may now be eligible to enter the contest. If you're planning on publishing a new game soon, you can also enter by submitting a private beta. Check out all the details in the terms and conditions. Submissions close on 31 December 2016.

The process:

Up to 20 finalists will get to showcase their games at an open event at the Saatchi Gallery in London on the 16th February 2017. At the event, the top 10 will be selected by the event attendees and the Google Play team. The top 10 will then get the opportunity to pitch to a jury of industry experts, from which the final winner and runners up will be selected.

Even if someone is NOT entering the contest:

Even if you're not eligible to enter the contest, you can still register to attend the final showcase event in London on 16 February 2017, check out some great indie games, and have fun with various industry experts and indie developers. We will also be hosting a workshop for all indie games developers from across EMEA in the new Google office in Kings Cross the next day, so this will be a packed week.

Get started:

Enter the Indie Games Contest now and visit the contest site to find out more about the contest, the event, and the workshop.

22 Nov 2016 4:05pm GMT

21 Nov 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Google Play services and Firebase for Android will support API level 14 at minimum

Posted by Doug Stevenson, Developer Advocate

Version 10.0.0 of the Google Play services client libraries, as well as the Firebase client libraries for Android, will be the last version of these libraries that support Android API level 9 (Android 2.3, Gingerbread). The next scheduled release of these libraries, version 10.2.0, will increase the minimum supported API level from 9 to 14 (Android 4.0.1, Ice Cream Sandwich). This change will happen in early 2017.

Why are we discontinuing support for Gingerbread and Honeycomb in Google Play services?

The Gingerbread platform is almost six years old. Many Android developers have already discontinued support for Gingerbread in their apps. This helps them build better apps that make use of the newer capabilities of the Android platform. For us, the situation is the same. By making this change, we will be able to provide a more robust collection of tools for Android developers with greater speed.

What this means for your Android app that uses Google Play services or Firebase:

You may use version 10.0.0 of Google Play services and Firebase as you are currently. It will continue to work with Gingerbread devices as it has in the past.

When you choose to upgrade to the future version 10.2.0, and if your app minimally supports API level 14 or greater (typically specified as "minSdkVersion" in your build.gradle), you will not encounter any versioning problems. However, if your app supports lower than API level 14, you will encounter a problem at build time with an error that looks like this:

Error:Execution failed for task ':app:processDebugManifest'.
> Manifest merger failed : uses-sdk:minSdkVersion 9 cannot be smaller than version 14 declared in library [com.google.android.gms:play-services:10.2.0]
        Suggestion: use tools:overrideLibrary="com.google.android.gms:play_services" to force usage

Unfortunately, the stated suggestion will not help you successfully run your app on older devices. In order to use Google Play services 10.2.0 and later, you can choose one of the following options:

1. Target API level 14 as the minimum supported API level.

This is the recommended course of action. To discontinue support for API levels that will no longer receive Google Play services updates, simply increase the minSdkVersion value in your app's build.gradle to at least 14. If you update your app in this way and publish it to the Play Store, users of devices with less than that level of support will not be able to see or download the update. However, they will still be able to download and use the most recently published version of the app that does target their device.

A very small percentage of all Android devices are using API levels less than 14. You can read more about the current distribution of Android devices. We believe that many of these old devices are not actively being used.

If your app still has a significant number of users on older devices, you can use multiple APK support in Google Play to deliver an APK that uses Google Play services 10.0.0. This is described below.

2. Build multiple APKs to support devices with an API level less than 14.

Along with some configuration and code management, you can build multiple APKs that support different minimum API levels, with different versions of Google Play services. You can accomplish this with build variants in Gradle. First, define build flavors for legacy and newer versions of your app. For example, in your build.gradle, define two different product flavors, with two different compile dependencies for the components of Play Services you're using:

productFlavors {
    legacy {
        minSdkVersion 9
        versionCode 901  // Min API level 9, v01
    }
    current {
        minSdkVersion 14
        versionCode 1401  // Min API level 14, v01
    }
}

dependencies {
    legacyCompile 'com.google.android.gms:play-services:10.0.0'
    currentCompile 'com.google.android.gms:play-services:10.2.0'
}

In the above situation, there are two product flavors being built against two different versions of the Google Play services client libraries. This will work fine if only APIs are called that are available in the 10.0.0 library. If you need to call newer APIs made available with 10.2.0, you will have to create a compatibility library for the newer API calls so that they are only built into the version of the application that can use them:

After building a release APK for each flavor, you then publish them both to the Play Store, and the device will update with the most appropriate version for that device. Read more about multiple APK support in the Play Store.

21 Nov 2016 8:28pm GMT

17 Nov 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Pixel Security: Better, Faster, Stronger

Posted by Paul Crowley, Senior Software Engineer and Paul Lawrence, Senior Software Engineer

Encryption protects your data if your phone falls into someone else's hands. The new Google Pixel and Pixel XL are encrypted by default to offer strong data protection, while maintaining a great user experience with high I/O performance and long battery life. In addition to encryption, the Pixel phones debuted running the Android Nougat release, which has even more security improvements.

This blog post covers the encryption implementation on Google Pixel devices and how it improves the user experience, performance, and security of the device.

File-Based Encryption Direct Boot experience

One of the security features introduced in Android Nougat was file-based encryption. File-based encryption (FBE) means different files are encrypted with different keys that can be unlocked independently. FBE also separates data into device encrypted (DE) data and credential encrypted (CE) data.

Direct boot uses file-based encryption to allow a seamless user experience when a device reboots by combining the unlock and decrypt screen. For users, this means that applications like alarm clocks, accessibility settings, and phone calls are available immediately after boot.

Enhanced with TrustZone® security

Modern processors provide a means to execute code in a mode that remains secure even if the kernel is compromised. On ARM®-based processors this mode is known as TrustZone. Starting in Android Nougat, all disk encryption keys are stored encrypted with keys held by TrustZone software. This secures encrypted data in two ways:

Encryption on Pixel phones

Protecting different folders with different keys required a distinct approach from full-disk encryption (FDE). The natural choice for Linux-based systems is the industry-standard eCryptFS. However, eCryptFS didn't meet our performance requirements. Fortunately one of the eCryptFS creators, Michael Halcrow, worked with the ext4 maintainer, Ted Ts'o, to add encryption natively to ext4, and Android became the first consumer of this technology. ext4 encryption performance is similar to full-disk encryption, which is as performant as a software-only solution can be.

Additionally, Pixel phones have an inline hardware encryption engine, which gives them the ability to write encrypted data at line speed to the flash memory. To take advantage of this, we modified ext4 encryption to use this hardware by adding a key reference to the bio structure, within the ext4 driver before passing it to the block layer. (The bio structure is the basic container for block I/O in the Linux kernel.) We then modified the inline encryption block driver to pass this to the hardware. As with ext4 encryption, keys are managed by the Linux keyring. To see our implementation, take a look at the source code for the Pixel kernel.

While this specific implementation of file-based encryption using ext4 with inline encryption benefits Pixel users, FBE is available in AOSP and ready to use, along with the other features mentioned in this post.

17 Nov 2016 9:33pm GMT

10 Nov 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Understanding APK packaging in Android Studio 2.2

Posted by Wojtek Kaliciński, Android Developer Advocate

Android Studio 2.2 launched recently with many new and improved features. Some of the changes are easy to miss because they happened under the hood in the Android Gradle plugin, such as the newly rewritten integrated APK packaging and signing step.

APK Signature Scheme v2

With the introduction of the new APK Signature Scheme v2 in Android 7.0 Nougat, we decided to rewrite how assembling APKs works in the Android Gradle plugin. You can read all about the low-level technical details of v2 signatures in the documentation, but here's a quick tl;dr summary of the info you need as an Android app developer:

Why introduce this change to how Android verifies APKs? Firstly, for enhanced security and extensibility of this new signing format, and secondly for performance - the new signatures take significantly less time to verify on the device (no need for costly decompression), resulting in faster app installation times.

The consequence of this new signing scheme, however, is that there are new constraints on the APK creation process. Since only uncompressed file contents were verified in v1, that allowed for quite a lot of modifications to be made after APK signing - files could be moved around or even recompressed. In fact, the zipalign tool which was part of the build process did exactly that - it was used to align ZIP entries on correct byte boundaries for improved runtime performance.

Because v2 signatures verify all bytes in the archive and not individual ZIP entries, running zipalign is no longer possible after signing. That's why compression, aligning and signing now happens in a single, integrated step of the build process.

If you have any custom tasks in your build process that involve tampering with or post-processing the APK file in any way, please make sure you disable them or you risk invalidating the v2 signature and thus making your APKs incompatible with Android 7.0 and above.

Should you choose to do signing and aligning manually (such as from the command line), we offer a new tool in the Android SDK, called apksigner, that provides both v1 and v2 APK signing and verification. Note that you need to run zipalign before running apksigner if you are using v2 signatures. Also remember the jarsigner tool from the JDK is not compatible with Android v2 signatures, so you can't use it to re-sign your APKs if you want to retain the v2 signature.

In case you want to disable adding v1 or v2 signatures when building with the Android Gradle plugin, you can add these lines to your signingConfig section in build.gradle:

v1SigningEnabled false
v2SigningEnabled false

Note: both signing schemes are enabled by default in Android Gradle plugin 2.2.

Release builds for smaller APKs

We took this opportunity when rewriting the packager to make some optimizations to the size of release APKs, resulting in faster downloads, smaller delta updates on the Play Store, and less wasted space on the device. Here are some of the changes we made:

These changes help make your releases as small as possible so that users can download and update your app even on a slower connection or on less capable devices. But what about debug builds?

Debug builds for installation speed

When developing apps you want to keep the iteration cycle fast - change code, build, and deploy on a connected device or emulator. Since Android Studio 2.0 we've been working to make all the steps as fast as possible. With Instant Run we're now able to update only the changed code and resources during runtime, while the new Emulator brings multi-processor support and faster ADB speeds for quicker APK transfer and installation. Build improvements can cut that time even further and in Android Studio 2.2 we're introducing incremental packaging and parallel compression for debug builds. Together with other features like selectively packaging resources for the target device density and ABI this will make your development even faster.

A word of caution: the APK files created for Instant Run or by invoking a debug build are not meant for distribution on the Play Store! They contain additional instrumentation code for Instant Run and are missing resources for device configurations other than the one that was connected when you started the build. Make sure you only distribute release versions of the APK which you can create using the Android Studio Generate Signed APK command or the assembleRelease Gradle task.

10 Nov 2016 7:45pm GMT

09 Nov 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Adding TV Channels to Your App with the TIF Companion Library

Posted by Nick Felker and Sachit Mishra, Developer Programs Engineers

The TV Input Framework (TIF) on Android TV makes it easy for third-party app developers to create their own TV channels with any type of linear media. It introduces a new way for apps to engage with users with a high-quality channel surfing experience, and it gives users a single interface to browse and watch all of their channels.

To help developers get started with building TV channels, we have created the TV Input Framework Companion Library, which includes a number of helper methods and classes to make the development process as easy as possible.

This library provides standard classes to set up a background task that updates the program guide and an interface that helps integrate your media player with the playback controller, as well as supports the new TV Recording APIs that are available in Android Nougat. It includes everything you need to start showing your content on your Android TV's live TV app.

(Note: source from android-tv-sample-inputs sample)

To get started, take a look at the sample app and documentation. The sample demonstrates how to extend this library to create custom channels and manage video playback. Developers can immediately get started with the sample app by updating the XMLTV file with their own content or dynamically creating channels in the SampleJobService.

You can include this library in your app by copying the library directory from the sample into your project root directory. Then, add the following to your project's settings.gradle file:

include ':library'

In your app's build.gradle file, add the following to your dependencies:

compile project(':library')

Android TV continues to grow, and whether your app has on-demand or live media, TIF is a great way to keep users engaged with your content. One partner for example, Haystack TV, recently integrated TIF into their app and it now accounts for 16% of watch time for new users on Android TV.

Check out our TV developer site to learn more about Android TV, and join our developer community on Google+ at g.co/androidtvdev to discuss this library and other topics with TV developers.

09 Nov 2016 4:45pm GMT

07 Nov 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

CMake and ndk-build support in Android Studio 2.2

Posted by Kathryn Shih, Android Product Manager

In addition to supporting the experimental Gradle plugin, Android Studio 2.2 enables you to build C/C++ components of Android projects using CMake and ndk-build.

The Android Studio team plans to continue to support the experimental Gradle plugin. This will eventually replace the current Gradle plugin, providing additional tightly-integrated benefits to C/C++ developers such as smarter dependency management. So if you're interested in someday having the smartest possible interface between your IDE and your build system, you shouldn't ignore the experimental plugin.

CMake and ndk-build are useful alternatives to Gradle in several cases:

For new projects, we recommend using CMake or experimental Gradle. For new Android projects with limited C++, we recommend trying the experimental Gradle plugin. For projects with substantial amounts of C++, or where you want the maximally stable build configuration, we recommend using a CMake build. Android Studio intends CMake to be a permanently supported solution.

While we think that there are substantial advantages to having a single build system able to handle all parts of an Android application, stabilizing the experimental plugin is not an option for us because it relies on Gradle APIs that are still a work in progress. Until the Gradle APIs are stabilized, the experimental plugin will keep changing, particularly in its Domain Specific Language, and will be strictly tied to a very specific version of Gradle itself.

Note that the the old, undocumented ndkCompile integration is deprecated. If you are using it, you need to move away from it as we'll remove it completely in the near future. We recommend migrating to gradle+cmake via our migration guide.

Migrating from Eclipse to Android Studio

We no longer support the Eclipse ADT. To get started migrating, download and install Android Studio. For most projects, migration is as simple as importing your existing Eclipse ADT projects in Android Studio with the File → New→ Import Project menu option. For more details on the migration process, check out the migration guide.

Feedback and Open Source Contributions

We're dedicated to making Android Studio the best possible integrated development environment for building Android apps, so if there are missing features or other challenges preventing you from using Android Studio, we want to hear about it [please take our survey]. You can also file bugs or feature requests directly with the team, and let us know via our Twitter or Google+ accounts.

Android Studio is an open source project, available to all at no cost. Check out our Open Source project page if you're interested in contributing or learning more.

07 Nov 2016 7:09pm GMT

03 Nov 2016

feedAndroid Developers Blog

Test on Android 7.1 Developer Preview in Firebase Test Lab

By Ahmed Mounir Gad, Product Manager, Firebase Test Lab

To deliver the best user experience right out of the gate, Firebase Test Lab for Android allows you to test your apps and ensure their compatibility with multiple device configurations, across OS versions, screen orientations, and locales. With a single click, you can run your tests on hundreds of device configurations in Google Cloud and receive your results quickly.

Today, we're excited to announce the availability of the Android 7.1 Developer Preview on Firebase Test Lab virtual devices. In addition to testing the Android 7.1 Developer Preview on your physical Android Device with the Android Beta program, or on your local Android Emulator, you can use the Firebase Test Lab to scale your app testing to hundreds of Android virtual devices.

You can also use Firebase Test Lab to perform your own testing. If you don't have any test scripts, Robo test is ideal for doing your basic compatibility testing on the new platform. It crawls your app in an attempt to find crashes. You can also use the Espresso Test Recorder in Android Studio to record your own instrumentation tests without writing any code.

From now until the end of December (12/31/2016), Firebase Test Lab will be offered at no charge on the Firebase Blaze plan for all virtual devices, to help you ensure the compatibility of your app with the Android 7.1 Developer Preview release, as well as with other Android releases.

Prepare your app for API level 25, then go to the Firebase Test Lab console to run your first test.

Happy testing!

Robo tests uncovering a crash on Android 7.1 Developer Preview for the Flood-It! app.

03 Nov 2016 8:15pm GMT