22 Mar 2019

feedLXer Linux News

How to create a Ubuntu repository server

This guide will show how to configure a local repository server based on Ubuntu Bionic, but it can be adapted to a previous version of Ubuntu or even to any distribution using Aptitude as the main package management system, like Debian or Mint. You might typically want to setup a local repository to save Internet bandwidth.

22 Mar 2019 2:12pm GMT

Nulloy – Music Player with Waveform Progress Bar

Nulloy is a cross-platform Qt 4 based music player released under an open source license. A music player you may not have heard of, but one worth checking out!

22 Mar 2019 12:57pm GMT

Top 10 New Linux SBCs to Watch in 2019

Here we examine 10 of the most intriguing, Linux-driven SBCs among the many products announced in the last four weeks that bookended the recent Embedded World show in Nuremberg.

22 Mar 2019 11:43am GMT

Firefox 67 Will Add Support for Running Different Firefox Installs Side by Side

With the Firefox 66 release out the door, Mozilla is now concentrating its efforts on the next major release of its open-source and cross-platform web browser used by millions of computer and mobile users worldwide, Firefox 67.

22 Mar 2019 10:29am GMT

Retail-oriented 21.5-inch panel PCs run on Kaby Lake and Bay Trail

Ibase's 21.5-inch "UPC-7210" and "UPC-6210" panel PCs run Linux or Windows on 7th Gen Kaby Lake-U and Bay Trail CPUs, respectively. Highlights include 64GB SSDs, mini-PCIe, mSATA, and IP65 protection. Sometimes there's a fine line between digital signage players and touch-panel PCs. Touch panels tend to be bulkier with lower resolution and fewer multi-display options [[he]#8230[/he]]

22 Mar 2019 9:14am GMT

4 questions Uber's open source program office answers with data

It's been said that "Software is eating the world," and every company will eventually become a "software company." Since open source is becoming the mainstream path for developing software, the way companies manage their relationships with the open source projects they depend on will be crucial for their success.read more

22 Mar 2019 8:00am GMT

How to Install and Configure Pydio on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Pydio is a free and open source cloud-based file-sharing and synchronization software that allows you to access all your data storages from the central location. It is very alternative to other file-sharing software such as ownCloud and Nextcloud. In this tutorial, we will learn how to install Pydio on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

22 Mar 2019 6:46am GMT

Why Open19 Designs Matter for Edge Computing

On the opening day of this year's Data Center World in Phoenix, Yuval Bachar, LinkedIn's principal engineer of data center architecture, was on hand to explain why the social network's Open19 Project will be an important part of data centers' move to the edge.

22 Mar 2019 5:31am GMT

Top 10 new Linux hacker boards to watch for in 2019

The last month has seen an explosion of new Linux-based SBCs ranging from a next-gen BeagleBone AI and a Whiskey Lake based UP Xtreme to the first maker boards from Google and Nvidia. A recent Global Market Insights report projects the single board computer market will grow from $600 million in 2018 to $1 billion […]

22 Mar 2019 4:17am GMT

Linux C Programming Tutorial Part 14 - Bitwise operators practical examples

In one of our earlier articles, we discussed the basics of bitwise operators. I hope you went through that article and are now ready to witness and understand some practical usage examples of these operators.

22 Mar 2019 3:03am GMT

How Install Redis on CentOS 7

Redis is a in memory key-value data structure store mainly used as a database, message broker or as a cache. Redis supports wide languages with flexibility and high performance. It supports different data structures like strings, lists, sets, maps, spatial indexes, and bitmaps.

22 Mar 2019 1:48am GMT

How to Configure Mouse Settings in Ubuntu

In this article, we will describe how to configure mouse settings in detail on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

22 Mar 2019 12:34am GMT

21 Mar 2019

feedLXer Linux News

Bare-Bones Monitoring with Monit and RRDtool

How to provide robust monitoring to low-end systems.

21 Mar 2019 11:20pm GMT

5 IoT Projects You Can Do Yourself on a Raspberry Pi

If you own a Raspberry Pi and want to get involved with IoT projects, here are some IoT projects you can do yourself with your Raspbery Pi.

21 Mar 2019 10:05pm GMT

LibreOffice 6.2.2 Released, New PocketBeagle SBC, Google Enforcing Permissions Rules on Apps, OpenShot 2.4.4 Now Available and DataPractices.org Has Joined The Linux Foundation

News briefs for March 21, 2019.

21 Mar 2019 8:51pm GMT

Getting started with Jaeger to build an Istio service mesh

Service mesh provides a dedicated network for service-to-service communication in a transparent way. Istio aims to help developers and operators address service mesh features such as dynamic service discovery, mutual transport layer security (TLS), circuit breakers, rate limiting, and tracing.read more

21 Mar 2019 7:37pm GMT

17 Mar 2019

feedKernel Planet

Michael S. Tsirkin

Virtio Network Device Failover


Support for Virtio Network Device Failover which has been merged for linux 4.17 presents an interesting study in interface design: both for operating systems and hypervisors. Read on for an article examining the problem domain, solution space and describing the current status of the implementation.


PT versus PV NIC

Imagine a Virtual Machine running on a hypervisor on a host computer. The hypervisor has access to a network to which the host is attached, but ow should guest gain this access? The answer could depend on the type of the netwok and on the network interface on the host. For the sake of this article we focus on Ethernet networks and NICs. In this setup a popular solution extends (bridges) the Ethernet network into the guest by exposing a virtual Ethernet device as part of the VM.

In most setups a single host NIC would be shared between VMs. Two popular configurations are shows below:

vm network configuration

In the first diagram (on the left) the NIC exposes Virtual Function (VFs) interfaces which the hypervisor "passes through" - makes accessible to the guests. Using such Passthrough (PT) interfaces packets can pass between the guest and the NIC directly. For PCI devices, device memory can actually be mapped into the address space of the virtual machine in such as way that guest can actually access the device without invoking the hypervisor. In the setup on the right packets are passed between the guest and the NIC by the hypervisor. The hypervisor interface used by guest for this purpose would commonly be a PV - Para-virtual (i.e. designed for the hypervisor) NIC. One example would be the Virtio network device, used for example with the KVM hypervisor. By comparison, Microsoft HyperV guests use the netvsc device with its PV NICs.

Since the underlying packets are still handled by the physical NIC in both cases, it would be unusual for the second (PV) setup to outperform the first (PT) one. Besides removing some of the hypervisor overhead, passthrough allows driver within the guest to be precisely tuned to the physical device.

However the PV NIC setup obviously offers more flexibility - for example, the hypervisor can implement an arbitrary filtering policy for the networking packets. By comparison, with PT NICs we are limited to the features presented by hardware NICs which are often more limited: some of them only have simplest filtering capabilities. As an example of a simple and effective filtering/security measure, guest would often be prevented from modifying the MAC address of its devices, limiting guest's access to the host's network.

But even besides limitations of specific hardware the standardized interface independent of the physical NIC makes the system easier to manage: use of a standard driver within guest as well as a well known state of the device enable features such as live migration of guests between hypervisors: guests can often be moved with negligible network downtime.

Same can not be generally said with the passthrough setup, for example, one of the issues encountered with it is that even a small difference between hypervisor hosts in their physical hardware would require expensive reconfiguration when switching hypervisors.

Can not something be done with respect to performance to get the speed benefits of pass-through without giving up on live migration and similar advantages of standardized PV NIC setups? One approach could be designing a pass-through NIC around a standard paravirtualized interface. This is the approach taken by the Virtio Data Path Accelerator devices. In absence of such an accelerator, Virtual Network Device Failover presents another possible approach.

Network device Failover basics

Conceptually, the idea behind Virtual Network Device Failover is simple: assume that a standard PV interface only brings benefits part of the time. The system would change its configuration accordingly - e.g. when migration is required use the PV interface, when it's not - use a PT device.

When possible hypervisor will pass through the NIC to the guest as a "primary" device. To reduce downtime, a "standby" PV device could be kept around at all times. When PV features are not required, hypervisor can add guest access to the primary PT device. At other times the standby PV interface is used.

Accordingly, guest would be required to switch over between primary and standby interfaces depending on availability of the primary interface.

network device failover basics

An astute reader might notice that the above switching sounds a bit like the active-backup configuration of the bond and team network drivers in Linux. That is true - in fact in the past one of these drivers has often been used to implement network device failover. Let's take a quick look at how active-backup can be used for network device failover.

Network Device Failover using active-backup

This text will use the term bond when meaning the network device created by either a bond or the team driver: the differences between these two mostly have to do with how devices are created, configured and destroyed and will not be covered here.

A bond device is a master software network device which can enslave multiple interfaces. In our case these would be the standby and the primary devices. For this, the bond master needs to be created and initialized with slave interface names before slaves are brought up. When priority of the primary interface is set higher than priority of the standby, the bond will switch between interfaces as required for failover.

The active-backup was designed to help create redundancy and improve uptime for systems with multiple NIC devices. To make it work for the virtual machine, we need guest to detect interface failure on the primary interface and switch to the stanby one. This can be achieved for example by removing the interface by making the hypervisor emulate hotplug removal request.

However the above might already hint at some of the issues with this approach to failover: first, bond needs to be set up by userspace. Configuring a bond for all devices unconditionally would be an option but would add overhead to all users. On the other hand, adding a slave to the bond would require bringing the slave down. For this reason to avoid downtime bond has to be created upfront, even if only the standby device is present during guest initialization.

Further, setting up an active-backup bond is considered a question of policy and thus is left up to guest admin. By comparison network failover is a mechanism - there's no good reason not to use a PT interface if it is available to the guest. Should hypervisor want to force guest to create a bond, hypervisor would need a measure of control over guest network configuration which might conflict with the way some guest admins like to set up their networking.

Another issue is with device selection. Bond tends to address devices using their names. While recently device names under many Linux distributions became more predictable, it is not the case for all distributions, and specific naming schemes might differ. It is thus a challenge for the hypervisor to specify to the guest which interfaces need to be bonded together.

To help reduce downtime, the bond will also broadcast location information on a network on every switch. This is not too problematic but might cause extra load on the network - likely unnecessary in case of virtual device failover since packets are in the end traveling over the same physical wire.

Maintaining a consistent MAC address for the guest is necessary to avoid need for all guest neighbours to rediscover the MAC address using the slow APR/Neighbour Discovery. To help with that, bond will try to program the MAC address into the primary device when it's attached. If MAC programming is disabled as a security measure (as described above) bond will generally fail to attach to this slave.

Failover goals; 1,2 and 3 device models

The goal of the network device failover support in Linux is to address the above problems. Specifically: - PT cards with MAC programming disabled need to be supported - configuration should happen automatically, with no need for userspace to make a policy decision - in particular the primary/standby pair of devices should be selected with no need for special configuration to be passed from hypervisor - support as wide a range of existing network setup tools as possible with minimal changes

Most of the design seems to fall out from the above goals in a manner that is more or less straight-forward: - design supports two devices: a standby PV device is present at all times and used by default; a primary PT device is used by preference when it's available - failover support is initialized by the PV device driver, e.g. in the case of Virtio this happens when the Virtio-net driver detects a special feature bit set by the hypervisor on the Virtio PV device - to support devices without MAC programming, both standby and primary can be simply required to be initialized (e.g. by the hypervisor) with the same MAC address - in that case, MAC address can also used by failover to locate and enslave the primary device

However, the requirement to minimize userspace changes caused a certain amount of debate about the best way to model the failover setup, with the debate centered around the number of network device structures being created and exposed to userspace. It seems worthwhile to list the options that have been debated, below:

1-device model

In a 1-device model userspace sees a single failover device at all times. At any time this device would be either the PT or the PV device. As userspace might need to configure devices differently depending on the specific driver used, a new interface would have to be introduced for kernel to report driver changes to userspace, and for userspace to detect the actual driver used. However, as long as userspace does not contain any driver-specific code, userspace tools that already work with the Virtio device seem to be guaranteed to keep working without any changes, but with a better performance.

To best of author's knowledge, no actual code supporting this mode has ever been posted.

2-device model

In a 2-device model, the standby and primary devices are exposed to userspace as two network devices. The devices aren't independent: primary device is a slave and standby is the master in that when primary is present, standby device forwards outgoing packets for transmission on the primary device.

PT driver discovery and device specific configuration can happen on the slave interface using standard device discovery interfaces.

Both portable configuration affecting both PV and PT devices (such as interface MTU) and the configuration that is specific to the PV device will happen on the master interface.

The 2-device model is used by the netvsc driver in Linux. It has been used in production for a number of years with no significant issues reported. However, it diverges from the model used by the bond driver, and the combination of PV-specific and portable configuration on the master device was seen by some developers as confusing.

3-device model

The 3-device model basically follows bond: a master failoverdevice forwards packets to either the primary or the standbyslaves, depending on the primary's availability.

Failover device maintains portable configuration, primary and standby can each have its own driver-specific configuration.

This model is used by the net_failover driverwhich has been present in Linux since version 4.17. This model isn't transparent to userspace: for example, presence of at least two devices (failover master and primary slave) at all times seems to confuse some userspace tools such as dracut, udev, initramfs-tools, cloud-init. Most of these tools have since been updated to check the slave flag of each interface and ignore interfaces where it is set.

3-device model with hidden slaves

It is possible that the compatibility of the 3-device model with existing userspace can be improved by somehow hiding the slave devices from most legacy userspace tools, unless they explicitly ask for them.

For example it could be possible to somehow move them to some kind of special network namespace. No patches to implement this idea have been posted so far.

Hypervisor failover support

At the time of this article writing, support for virtual network device failover in the QEMU/KVM hypervisor is still being worked upon. This work uncovered a surprising number of subtle issues some of which will be covered below.

Primary device availability

Network Failover driver relies on hotplug events for the primary device availability. In other words, to make the primary device available to the guest the hypervisor emulates a hot-add hotplug event on a bus within VM (e.g. the virtual PCI bus). To make the primary device unavailable, a hot-unplug event is emulated.

Note that at the moment most PCI drivers expect a chance to be notified and execute cleanup before a device is removed. From hypervisor's point of view, this would mean that it can not remove the PT device and e.g. can not initiate migration until it receives a response from the VM guest. Making hypervisor depend on guest being responsive in this way is problematic e.g. from the security point of view.

As described earlier in a lwn.net article most drivers do not at the moment support surprise removal well. When that is addressed, hypervisors will be able to switch to emulate surprise removal to remove dependency on guest responsiveness.

Existing Guest compatibility

One of the issues that hypervisors take pains to handle well is compatibility with existing guests, that is guests which have not been modified with virtual network device failover support.

One possible issue is that existing guests can become confused if they detect two Ethernet devices with the same MAC address.

To help address this issue, the hypervisor can defer making the primary device visible to the guest until after the PV driver has been initialized. The PV driver can signal to the hypervisor guest support for the virtual network device failover.

For example, in case of the virtio-net driver, hypervisor can signal the support for failover to guest by setting the VIRTIO_NET_F_STANDBYhost feature bit on the Virtio device. If failover is enabled, the driver can signal failover support to hypervisor by setting the matching VIRTIO_NET_F_STANDBY guest feature bit on the device.

After detecting a modern guest with failover support, the hypervisor can hot-add the primary device. Device will have to be hot-removed again on guest reset - in case the VM will reboot into a legacy guest without failover support.

This is also helpful to avoid initializing a useless failover device on hypervisors without actual failover support.

As of the time of writing of this article, the definition of the VIRTIO_NET_F_STANDBY and its support are present in Linux. Some preliminary hypervisor patches with known issues have been posted.

Packet filtering issues

Early implementations of the failover in QEMU were originally tested with an emulated NIC. When tested on a physical one, it was quickly detected that for many configurations significant downtime occurs.

The reason has to do with how incoming packets are processed by the host NIC. Generally, a packet is matched against some rules (e.g. the destination MAC is matched using a forwarding filter) and a decision is made to forward the packet either to the hypervisor or to a guest through a VF.

incoming packet filtered

Consider again a hypervisor transitioning between configurations where a primary passthrough VF is available to a configuration where it is unavailable to the guest.

When the primary device is available to the guest we want incoming packets with destination MAC matching the device to be forwarded through the primary. In many configurations this happens immediately when the hypervisor programs the MAC into the VF. In these setups, when primary device becomes unavailable to guest, unless special steps are taken, incoming packets will still be filtered to it and eventually dropped.

incoming packet being dropped by device

One possible fix is have the hypervisor update the host NIC filtering, e.g., by updating the MAC of the VF to a different value. Another is to change the filtering on the host NIC such that it only happens when a driver is attached to the VF. This seems to already be the case for some drivers (such as ice,mlx) and so one can argue that others should be changed to behave consistently. Another approach would be to teach hypervisor to detect the difference and handle both types of behaviour.

Conversely, when the primary interface becomes available to guest, we would like packets to start flowing through the primary but only after the driver is bound to it. Again, on some devices hypervisor might need to intervene to update the forwarding filter on the host NIC. One issue is that it might take guests a while to detect a hot-add event and bind a driver to the primary device. This is because hotplug is not generally considered a data path operation. Should the host NIC filter be updated by the hypervisor immediately on hot-add, there will be a large window during which guest driver has not been initialized yet.

incoming packet being dropped by driver

As a possible fix, hypervisors can detect that the pass-through driver has been attached to device. For example, drivers enable bus-mastering on the device when they start using it, and disable it when they stop using it. Hypervisor can detect this event and update the forwarding filter on the host NIC accordingly.

QEMU patches addressing both issues have been posted on the QEMU mailing list.

An alternative could be to add a way for guest to request the switch between primary and standby through the PV device driver. This might reduce the downtime slightly: some PT drivers might enable bus mastering before they are fully ready to receive packets, causing a small window during which packets are still dropped.

This alternative approach is used by the netvsc driver. Using that with net_failover would require extending the Virtio interface and adding support to the net_failover driver in Linux, as of today no patches implementing this change have been posted.

As described above, some differences in behaviour between host NICs make failover implementation harder. While not yet widely supported, use of VF representors could make it easier to consistently configure host NICs for use by failover. However, for it to be helpful to userspace wide support across many NICs would be necessary.

Non-MAC based pairing

One basic question that had to be addressed early in the design was: how does failover master decide to which slave devices to bind? Unlike bond, failover by design can not rely on the administrator supplying the configuration.

So far, implementations focused on matching MAC addresses as a way to match slave devices. However, some configurations (sometimes called trusted VFs) do not supply VF MAC addresses by the hypervisor.

This seems to call for an alternative mechanism for locating the primary that is not based on the MAC address.

The netvsc driver uses a serial number value to locate the primary device. The serial is typically communicated through the VMBus interface and attached to a para-virtual PCI bus slot created for the device. QEMU/KVM traditionally do not have a para-virtual bus implementation, relying instead of emulating a PCI bus for VMs. One possible approach for QEMU would be to attach an ID value to a PCI slot, or bridge. For example, an ACPI Slot Unique Number, the PCI Physical Slot Number register, or an alternative vendor-specific ID register could be fit for this purpose. The ID could be supplied to the VM guest through the Virtio device. Failover driver would locate the slot based on the ID, and bind to any device located behind the slot. It would then program the MAC address from the standby device into the primary device.

An early implementation of this idea has been posted on the QEMU mailing list, however no patches to the failover driver have been posted yet.

Host network topology and other optimizations

In some configurations it might be better for the guest to use the PV interface in preference to the passthrough one. For example, if the PCI bus is very busy, and there's spare CPU capacity on the host, it might be faster to send a packet that is destined to another VM on the same host through the hypervisor, bypassing the PCI bus.

This seems to call for keeping both interfaces active at all times. Supporting such an optimization would need to address the possibility of VM migration as well as the dynamic nature of the CPU/PCI bus available capacity, such that the specific interface used for sending packets to each destination can change at any time.

No patches for such support have been posted as of the time of writing of this article.

Specification status

Definition of the VIRTIO_NET_F_STANDBY has been included in the latest Virtio specification draft virtio-v1.1-csprd01.

Non-Linux/non-KVM support

Besides Linux, which systems could benefit from virtual network device failover support?

The DPDK set of userspace drivers is set to gain this support soon.

Drivers for other operating systems could also benefit from increased performance. One can expect the work on these drivers to start in earnest once the hypervisor support is widely available.

Other virtual devices besides Virtio could implement failover. netvsc already has a 2-device implementation that does not rely on the net_failover driver. It is possible that xen-netfront or vmxnet devices could use the failover driver. The author is not familiar with these devices.

Summary

A straight-forward sounding idea of improving performance for a Virtio network device by allowing networking traffic for the VM to temporary travel over a pass-through device exposed a wealth of issues on both VM host and guest sides.

Acknowledgements

The author thanks Jens Freimann for help analyzing netvsc as well as proof-reading the draft and suggesting corrections. The author thanks multiple contibutors who worked on implementation and helped review and guide the feature design over time.

17 Mar 2019 5:22am GMT

12 Mar 2019

feedKernel Planet

Kees Cook: security things in Linux v5.0

Previously: v4.20.

Linux kernel v5.0 was released last week! Looking through the changes, here are some security-related things I found interesting:

read-only linear mapping, arm64
While x86 has had a read-only linear mapping (or "Low Kernel Mapping" as shown in /sys/kernel/debug/page_tables/kernel under CONFIG_X86_PTDUMP=y) for a while, Ard Biesheuvel has added them to arm64 now. This means that ranges in the linear mapping that contain executable code (e.g. modules, JIT, etc), are not directly writable any more by attackers. On arm64, this is visible as "Linear mapping" in /sys/kernel/debug/kernel_page_tables under CONFIG_ARM64_PTDUMP=y, where you can now see the page-level granularity:

---[ Linear mapping ]---
...
0xffffb07cfc402000-0xffffb07cfc403000    4K PTE   ro NX SHD AF NG    UXN MEM/NORMAL
0xffffb07cfc403000-0xffffb07cfc4d0000  820K PTE   RW NX SHD AF NG    UXN MEM/NORMAL
0xffffb07cfc4d0000-0xffffb07cfc4d1000    4K PTE   ro NX SHD AF NG    UXN MEM/NORMAL
0xffffb07cfc4d1000-0xffffb07cfc79d000 2864K PTE   RW NX SHD AF NG    UXN MEM/NORMAL

per-task stack canary, arm
ARM has supported stack buffer overflow protection for a long time (currently via the compiler's -fstack-protector-strong option). However, on ARM, the compiler uses a global variable for comparing the canary value, __stack_chk_guard. This meant that everywhere in the kernel needed to use the same canary value. If an attacker could expose a canary value in one task, it could be spoofed during a buffer overflow in another task. On x86, the canary is in Thread Local Storage (TLS, defined as %gs:20 on 32-bit and %gs:40 on 64-bit), which means it's possible to have a different canary for every task since the %gs segment points to per-task structures. To solve this for ARM, Ard Biesheuvel built a GCC plugin to replace the global canary checking code with a per-task relative reference to a new canary in struct thread_info. As he describes in his blog post, the plugin results in replacing:

8010fad8:       e30c4488        movw    r4, #50312      ; 0xc488
8010fadc:       e34840d0        movt    r4, #32976      ; 0x80d0
...
8010fb1c:       e51b2030        ldr     r2, [fp, #-48]  ; 0xffffffd0
8010fb20:       e5943000        ldr     r3, [r4]
8010fb24:       e1520003        cmp     r2, r3
8010fb28:       1a000020        bne     8010fbb0
...
8010fbb0:       eb006738        bl      80129898 <__stack_chk_fail>

with:

8010fc18:       e1a0300d        mov     r3, sp
8010fc1c:       e3c34d7f        bic     r4, r3, #8128   ; 0x1fc0
...
8010fc60:       e51b2030        ldr     r2, [fp, #-48]  ; 0xffffffd0
8010fc64:       e5943018        ldr     r3, [r4, #24]
8010fc68:       e1520003        cmp     r2, r3
8010fc6c:       1a000020        bne     8010fcf4
...
8010fcf4:       eb006757        bl      80129a58 <__stack_chk_fail>

r2 holds the canary saved on the stack and r3 the known-good canary to check against. In the former, r3 is loaded through r4 at a fixed address (0x80d0c488, which "readelf -s vmlinux" confirms is the global __stack_chk_guard). In the latter, it's coming from offset 0x24 in struct thread_info (which "pahole -C thread_info vmlinux" confirms is the "stack_canary" field).

per-task stack canary, arm64
The lack of per-task canary existed on arm64 too. Ard Biesheuvel solved this differently by coordinating with GCC developer Ramana Radhakrishnan to add support for a register-based offset option (specifically "-mstack-protector-guard=sysreg -mstack-protector-guard-reg=sp_el0 -mstack-protector-guard-offset=..."). With this feature, the canary can be found relative to sp_el0, since that register holds the pointer to the struct task_struct, which contains the canary. I'm hoping there will be a workable Clang solution soon too (for this and 32-bit ARM). (And it's also worth noting that, unfortunately, this support isn't yet in a released version of GCC. It's expected for 9.0, likely this coming May.)

top-byte-ignore, arm64
Andrey Konovalov has been laying the groundwork with his Top Byte Ignore (TBI) series which will also help support ARMv8.3's Pointer Authentication (PAC) and ARMv8.5's Memory Tagging (MTE). While TBI technically conflicts with PAC, both rely on using "non-VA-space" (Virtual Address) bits in memory addresses, and getting the kernel ready to deal with ignoring non-VA bits. PAC stores signatures for checking things like return addresses on the stack or stored function pointers on heap, both to stop overwrites of control flow information. MTE stores a "tag" (or, depending on your dialect, a "color" or "version") to mark separate memory allocation regions to stop use-after-tree and linear overflows. For either of these to work, the CPU has to be put into some form of the TBI addressing mode (though for MTE, it'll be a "check the tag" mode), otherwise the addresses would resolve into totally the wrong place in memory. Even without PAC and MTE, this byte can be used to store bits that can be checked by software (which is what the rest of Andrey's series does: adding this logic to speed up KASan).

ongoing: implicit fall-through removal
An area of active work in the kernel is the removal of all implicit fall-through in switch statements. While the C language has a statement to indicate the end of a switch case ("break"), it doesn't have a statement to indicate that execution should fall through to the next case statement (just the lack of a "break" is used to indicate it should fall through - but this is not always the case), and such "implicit fall-through" may lead to bugs. Gustavo Silva has been the driving force behind fixing these since at least v4.14, with well over 300 patches on the topic alone (and over 20 missing break statements found and fixed as a result of the work). The goal is to be able to add -Wimplicit-fallthrough to the build so that the kernel will stay entirely free of this class of bug going forward. From roughly 2300 warnings, the kernel is now down to about 200. It's also worth noting that with Stephen Rothwell's help, this bug has been kept out of linux-next by him sending warning emails to any tree maintainers where a new instance is introduced (for example, here's a bug introduced on Feb 20th and fixed on Feb 21st).

ongoing: refcount_t conversions
There also continues to be work converting reference counters from atomic_t to refcount_t so they can gain overflow protections. There have been 18 more conversions since v4.15 from Elena Reshetova, Trond Myklebust, Kirill Tkhai, Eric Biggers, and Björn Töpel. While there are more complex cases, the minimum goal is to reduce the Coccinelle warnings from scripts/coccinelle/api/atomic_as_refcounter.cocci to zero. As of v5.0, there are 131 warnings, with the bulk of the remaining areas in fs/ (49), drivers/ (41), and kernel/ (21).

userspace PAC, arm64
Mark Rutland and Kristina Martsenko enabled kernel support for ARMv8.3 PAC in userspace. As mentioned earlier about PAC, this will give userspace the ability to block a wide variety of function pointer overwrites by "signing" function pointers before storing them to memory. The kernel manages the keys (i.e. selects random keys and sets them up), but it's up to userspace to detect and use the new CPU instructions. The "paca" and "pacg" flags will be visible in /proc/cpuinfo for CPUs that support it.

platform keyring
Nayna Jain introduced the trusted platform keyring, which cannot be updated by userspace. This can be used to verify platform or boot-time things like firmware, initramfs, or kexec kernel signatures, etc.

Edit: added userspace PAC and platform keyring, suggested by Alexander Popov
Edit: tried to clarify TBI vs PAC vs MTE

That's it for now; please let me know if I missed anything. The v5.1 merge window is open, so off we go! :)

© 2019, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.
Creative Commons License

12 Mar 2019 11:04pm GMT

Linux Plumbers Conference: Linux Plumbers Conference 2019 Call for Refereed-Track Proposals

We are pleased to announce the Call for Refereed-Track talk proposals for the 2019 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference, which will be held in Lisbon, Portugal on September 9-11 in conjunction with the Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit.

Refereed track presentations are 50 minutes in length (which includes time for questions and discussion) and should focus on a specific aspect of the "plumbing" in the Linux system. Examples of Linux plumbing include core kernel subsystems, toolchains, container runtimes, core libraries, windowing systems, management tools, device support, media creation/playback, and so on. The best presentations are not about finished work, but rather problems, proposals, or proof-of-concept solutions that require face-to-face discussions and debate.

For more information on submitting a Refereed-Track talk proposal, see the following:

https://www.linuxplumbersconf.org/event/4/abstracts

Please note that the submission system is the same as 2018. If you created an user account last year, you will be able to re-use the same credentials to submit and modify your proposal(s) this year.

The call for Microconferences proposals is also open, and we hope to see you in Lisbon this coming September!

12 Mar 2019 4:22pm GMT

Linux Plumbers Conference: Linux Plumbers Conference 2019 Call for Microconference Proposals

We are pleased to announce the Call for Microconferences for the 2019 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference, which will be held in Lisbon, Portugal on September 9-11 in conjunction with the Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit.

A microconference is a collection of collaborative sessions focused on problems in a particular area of the Linux plumbing, which includes the kernel, libraries, utilities, services, UI, and so forth, but can also focus on cross-cutting concerns such as security, scaling, energy efficiency, toolchains, container runtimes, or a particular use case. Good microconferences result in solutions to these problems and concerns, while the best microconferences result in patches that implement those solutions. For more information on submitting a microconference proposal, see the following:

https://www.linuxplumbersconf.org/event/4/abstracts

Please note that the submission system is the same as 2018. If you created an user account last year, you will be able to re-use the same credentials to submit and modify your proposal(s) this year.

Look for the upcoming call for refereed-track proposals, and we hope to see you in Lisbon this coming September!

12 Mar 2019 12:07am GMT

07 Mar 2019

feedKernel Planet

Michael Kerrisk (manpages): man-pages-5.00 is released

I've released man-pages-5.00. The release tarball is available on kernel.org. The browsable online pages can be found on man7.org. The Git repository for man-pages is available on kernel.org.

This release resulted from patches, bug reports, reviews, and comments from around 130 contributors. The release is rather larger than average, since it has been nearly a year since the last release. The release includes more than 600 commits that changed nearly 400 pages. In addition, 3 new manual pages were added.

Among the more significant changes in man-pages-5.,00 are the following:

In addition, two pages have been removed in this release after encouragement from Ingo Schwarze: mdoc(7) and mdoc.samples(7). As the commit message notes, groff_mdoc(7) from the groff project provides a better equivalent of mdoc.samples(7) and the mandoc project provides a better mdoc(7). And nowadays, there are virtually no pages in man-pages that use mdoc markup.

Again special thanks to Eugene Syromyatnikov, who contributed nearly 30 patches to this release!

07 Mar 2019 4:57am GMT

06 Mar 2019

feedKernel Planet

James Bottomley: Using TPM Based Client Certificates on Firefox and Apache

One of the useful features of Apache (or indeed any competent web server) is the ability to use client side certificates. All this means is that a certificate from each end of the TLS transaction is verified: the browser verifies the website certificate, but the website requires the client also to present one and verifies it. Using client certificates, when linked to your own client certificate CA gives web transactions the strength of two factor authentication if you do it on the login page. I use this feature quite a lot for all the admin features my own website does. With apache it's really simple to turn on with the

SSLCACertificateFile

Directive which allows you to specify the CA for the accepted certificates. In my own setup I have my own self signed certificate as CA and then all the authority certificates use it as the issuer. You can turn Client Certificate verification on per location basis simply by doing

<Location /some/web/location>
SSLVerifyClient require
</Location

And Apache will take care of requesting the client certificate and verifying it against the CA. The only caveat here is that TLSv1.3 currently fails to work for this, so you have to disable it with

SSLProtocol -TLSv1.3

Client Certificates in Firefox

Firefox is somewhat hard to handle for SSL because it includes its own hand written mozilla secure sockets code, which has a toolkit quite unlike any other ssl toolkit1. In order to import a client certificate and key into firefox, you need to create a pkcs12 file containing them and import that into the "Your Certificates" box which is under Preferences > Privacy & Security > View Certificates

Obviously, simply supplying a key file to firefox presents security issues because you'd like to prevent a clever hacker from gaining access to it and thus running off with your client certificate. Firefox achieves a modicum of security by doing all key operations over the PKCS#11 API via a software token, which should mean that even malicious javascript cannot gain access to your key but merely the signing API

However, assuming you don't quite trust this software separation, you need to store your client signing key in a secure vault like a TPM to make sure no web hacker can gain access to it. Various crypto system connectors, like the OpenSSL TPM2 and TPM2 engine, already exist but because Firefox uses its own crytographic code it can't take advantage of them. In fact, the only external object the Firefox crypto code can use is a PKCS#11 module.

Aside about TPM2 and PKCS#11

The design of PKCS#11 is that it is a loadable library which can find and enumerate keys and certificates in some type of hardware device like a USB Key or a PCI attached HSM. However, since the connector is simply a library, nothing requires it connect to something physical and the OpenDNSSEC project actually produces a purely software based cryptographic token. In theory, then, it should be easy

The problems come with the PKCS#11 expectation of key residency: The library allows the consuming program to enumerate a list of slots each of which may, or may not, be occupied by a single token. Each token may contain one or more keys and certificates. Now the TPM does have a concept of a key resident in NV memory, which is directly analagous to the PKCS#11 concept of a token based key. The problems start with the TPM2 PC Client Profile which recommends this NV area be about 512 bytes, which is big enough for all of one key and thus not very scalable. In fact, the imagined use case of the TPM is with volatile keys which are demand loaded.

Demand loaded keys map very nicely to the OpenSSL idea of a key file, which is why OpenSSL TPM engines are very easy to understand and use, but they don't map at all into the concept of token resident keys. The closest interface PKCS#11 has for handling key files is the provisioning calls, but even there they're designed for placing keys inside tokens and, once provisioned, the keys are expected to be non-volatile. Worse still, very few PKCS#11 module consumers actually do provisioning, they mostly leave it up to a separate binary they expect the token producer to supply.

Even if the demand loading problem could be solved, the PKCS#11 API requires quite a bit of additional information about keys, like ids, serial numbers and labels that aren't present in the standard OpenSSL key files and have to be supplied somehow.

Solving the Key File to PKCS#11 Mismatch

The solution seems reasonably simple: build a standard PKCS#11 library that is driven by a known configuration file. This configuration file can map keys to slots, as required by PKCS#11, and also supply all the missing information. the C_Login() operation is expected to supply a passphrase (or PIN in PKCS#11 speak) so that would be the point at which the private key could be loaded.

One of the interesting features of the above is that, while it could be implemented for the TPM engine only, it can also be implemented as a generic OpenSSL key exporter to PKCS#11 that happens also to take engine keys. That would mean it would work for non-engine keys as well as any engine that exists for OpenSSL … a nice little win.

Building an OpenSSL PKCS#11 Key Exporter

A Token can be built from a very simple ini like configuration file, with the global section setting global properties, like manufacurer id and library description and each individual section being used to instantiate a slot containing one key. We can make the slot name, the id and the label the same if not overridden and use key file directives to load the public and private keys. The serial number seems best constructed from a hash of the public key parameters (again, if not overridden). In order to support engine keys, the token library needs to know which engine to invoke, so I added an engine keyword to tell it.

With that, the mechanics of making the token library work with any OpenSSL key are set, the only thing is to plumb in the PKCS#11 glue API. At this point, I should add that the goal is simply to get keys and tokens working, not to replicate a full featured PKCS#11 API, so you shouldn't use this as something to test against for a reference implementation (the softhsm2 token is much better for that). However, it should be functional enough to use for storing keys in Firefox (as well as other things, see below).

The current reasonably full featured source code is here, with a reference build using the OpenSUSE Build Service here. I should add that some of the build failures are due to problems with p11-kit and others due to the way Debian gets the wrong engine path for libp11.

At Last: Getting TPM Keys working with Firefox

A final problem with Firefox is that there seems to be no way to import a certificate file for which the private key is located on a token. The only way Firefox seems to support this is if the token contains both the private key and the certificate. At least this is my own project, so some coding later, the token now supports certificates as well.

The next problem is more mundane: generating the certificate and key. Obviously, the safest key is one which has never left the TPM, which means the certificate request needs to be built from it. I chose a CSR type that also includes my name and my machine name for later easy discrimination (and revocation if I ever lose my laptop). This is the sequence of commands for my machine called jarvis.

create_tpm2_key -a key.tpm
openssl req -subj "/CN=James Bottomley/UID=jarivs/" -new -engine tpm2 -keyform engine -key key.tpm -nodes -out jarvis.csr
openssl x509 -in jarvis.csr -req -CA my-ca.crt -engine tpm2 -CAkeyform engine -CAkey my-ca.key -days 3650 -out jarvis.crt

As you can see from the above, the key is first created by the TPM, then that key is used to create a certificate request where the common name is my name and the UID is the machine name (this is just my convention, feel free to use your own) and then finally it's signed by my own CA, which you'll notice is also based on a TPM key. Once I have this, I'm free to create an ini file to export it as a token to Firefox

manufacturer id = Firefox Client Cert
library description = Cert for hansen partnership
[mozilla-key]
certificate = /home/jejb/jarvis.crt
private key = /home/jejb/key.tpm
engine = tpm2

All I now need to do is load the PKCS#11 shared object library into Firefox using Settings > Privacy & Security > Security Devices > Load and I have a TPM based client certificate ready for use.

Additional Uses

It turns out once you have a generic PKCS#11 exporter for engine keys, there's no end of uses for them. One of the most convenient has been using TPM2 keys with gnutls. Although gnutls was quick to adopt TPM 1.2 based keys, it's been much slower with TPM2 but because gnutls already has a PKCS#11 interface using the p11 kit URI format, you can easily build a config file of all the TPM2 keys you want it to use and simply use them by URI in gnutls.

Unfortunately, this has also lead to some problems, the biggest one being Firefox: Firefox assumes, once you load a PKCS#11 module library, that you want it to use every single key it can find, which is fine until it pops up 10 dialogue boxes each time you start it, one for each key password, particularly if there's only one key you actually care about it using. This problem doesn't seem solvable in the Firefox token interface, so the eventual way I did it was to add the ability to specify the config file in the environment (variable OPENSSL_PKCS11_CONF) and modify my xfce Firefox action to set this in the environment pointing at a special configuration file with only Firefox's key in it.

Conclusions and Future Work

Hopefully I've demonstrated this simple PKCS#11 converter can be useful both to keeping Firefox keys safe as well as uses in other things like gnutls. Unfortunately, it turns out that the world wide web is turning against PKCS#11 tokens as having usability problems and is moving on to something called FIDO2 tokens which have the web browser talking directly to the USB token. In my next technical post I hope to explain how you can use the Linux Kernel USB gadget system to connect a TPM up easily as a FIDO2 token so you can use the new passwordless webauthn protocol seamlessly.

06 Mar 2019 8:21pm GMT

05 Mar 2019

feedKernel Planet

Paul E. Mc Kenney: Parallel Programming: March 2018 deferred-processing query

TL;DR: Do you know of additional publicly visible production uses of sequnce locking, hazard pointers, or RCU not already called out in the remainder of this blog post?

I am updating the deferred-processing chapter of "Is Parallel Programming Hard, And, If So, What Can You Do About It?" and would like to include a list of publicly visible production uses of sequence locking, hazard pointers, and RCU. I suppose I could also include reference counting, but given that it was well known before I was born, I expect that its list would be way too long to be useful!

The only production use of sequence locking that I am aware of is within the Linux kernel, but I would be surprised if it is not rather widely used. Can you tell me of more publicly visible production sequence-locking uses?

Hazard pointers is used within MongoDB (v3.0 and later) and within Facebook's Folly library, which is used in production at Facebook and perhaps elsewhere as well. It is also implemented by several libraries called out on its Wikipedia page (Concurrent Building Blocks, Concurrency Kit, Atomic Ptr Plus, and libcds). Hazard pointers is also sometimes called "safe memory reclamation" (SMR). Any other production hazard-pointers uses?

RCU is used within the Linux kernel, the FreeBSD kernel, the OpenBSD kernel, Linux Trace Toolkit Next Generation (LTTng), QEMU, Knot DNS, Netsniff-ng, Sheepdog, GlusterFS, and gdnsd. It is also implemented by several libraries, including Userspace RCU, Concurrency Kit, Facebook's Folly library, and libcds. RCU is also called "epochs" (from Keir Fraser), "generations" (from Tornado/K42), "passive serialization" (from IBM zVM), and probably other things as well. Any other production RCU uses?

So what do I mean by "publicly visible"? Open-source projects should qualify, as should scholarly publications regarding proprietary projects. Similarly, "production use" means use for getting some job done, as opposed to research, prototyping, or benchmarking. Not that there is necessarily anything wrong with research, prototyping, or benchmarking, but we are looking for things a little bit further along the hype cycle. ;-)

05 Mar 2019 6:45pm GMT

28 Feb 2019

feedKernel Planet

Pete Zaitcev: Suddenly RISC-V

I knew about that thing because Rich Jones was a fan. Man, that guy is always ahead of the curve.

Coincidentially, a couple of days ago Amazon announced support for RISC-V in FreeRTOS (I have no idea how free that thig is. It's MIT license, but with Amazon, it might be patented up the gills.).

28 Feb 2019 7:51pm GMT

Pete Zaitcev: Mu accounts

Okay, here's the breakdown:

@pro: Programming, computers, networking, maybe some technical fields. It's basically migrated from SeaLion and is the main account of interest for the readers of this journal.

@stuff: Pictures of butterflies, gardening, and general banality.

@gat: Boomsticks.

@avia: Flying.

@union: Politics.

@anime: Anime, manga, and weaboo. Note that Ani-nouto is still officially at Smug.

Thinking about adding @cars and @space, if needed.

You can subscribe from any Fediverse instance, just hit the "Remote follow" button.

28 Feb 2019 5:06pm GMT

Pete Zaitcev: Multi-petabyte Swift cluster

In a Swift numbers post in 2017, I mentioned that the largest known cluster had about 20 PB. It is 2019 now and I just got a word that TurkCell is operating a cluster with 36 PB, and they are looking at growing it up to 50 PB by the end of the year. The information about its make-up is proprietary, unfortunately. The cluster was started in Icehouse release, so I'm sure there was a lot of churn and legacy, like 250 GB drives and RHEL 6.

28 Feb 2019 4:44pm GMT

26 Feb 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: Welcome to the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference blog

Planning for the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference is well underway. The planning committee will be posting various informational blurbs here, including information on hotels, microconference acceptance, evening events, scheduling, and so on. Next up will be a "call for proposals" that should appear soon.

LPC will be held at the Corinthia Hotel, Lisbon, Portugal, 9-11 September 2019, colocated with the Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit. The Linux Kernel Summit Track will very much be taking place during LPC 2019 again this year.

26 Feb 2019 2:21pm GMT

25 Feb 2019

feedKernel Planet

Pete Zaitcev: Elixir of your every fear

TFW you consider an O'Reily animal-cover book and the blurb says:

Authors Simon St. Laurent and J. David Eisenberg show you how Elixir combines the robust functional programming of Erlang with an approach that looks more like Ruby, and includes powerful macro features for metaprogramming.

25 Feb 2019 1:34am GMT

24 Feb 2019

feedKernel Planet

Davidlohr Bueso: Linux v4.20: Performance Goodies

With v4.20 out for almost the entire v5.0 rc-cycle, here are some of the more interesting performance related changes that made their way in.

signal: Use a smaller struct siginfo in the kernel

Reduces the memory footprint of 'struct siginfo' most of which is just reserved. Ultimately this avoid spanning two cachelines to just one.
[Commit 4ce5f9c9e754]

sched/fair: Fix cpu_util_wake() for 'execl' type workloads

Fix an exec() related performance regression, which was caused by incorrectly calculating load and migrating tasks on exec() when they shouldn't be.
[Commit c469933e7721]

locking/rwsem: Exit read lock slowpath if queue empty and no writer

This change presents a new heuristic for optimizing rw-semaphores, specifically in read-mostly scenarios. Before the patch, a reader could find itself in a situation when it was in the slowpath, due to an occasional writer thread, but the writer was then released, and only other readers are now present. At that point the waitqueue was enlarged unnecessarily, causing other readers attempting to lock to see waiting readers. This directly improves some issues found when (ab)using pread64() and XFS.
[Commit 4b486b535c33]

mm: mmap: zap pages with read mmap_sem in munmap

When a process unmaps a range of memory, the infamous mmap_sem would held for the duration of the entire munmap() call, which can be a long time for big mappings (reportedly up to 18 seconds for a 320Gb mapping). A two-phase approach was done to address this where the key is to unmap the vma first such that the semaphore can be taken exclusively at first then downgrade it such that it can be shared while doing the zapping and freeing of page tables.
[Commit dd2283f2605e b4cefb360512 cb4922496ae4]

net/tcp: optimize tcp internal pacing

When TCP implements its own pacing (when no fq packet scheduler is used), it is arming high resolution timer after a packet is sent. But in many cases (like TCP_RR kind of workloads), this high resolution timer expires before the application attempts to write the following packet. Setup the timer only when a packet is about to be sent, and if tcp_wstamp_ns is in the future, showing a ~10% performance increase in TCP_RR workloads.
[Commit 864e5c090749]

fs: better member layout of struct super_block

Re-organize 'struct super_block' to try and keep some frequently accessed fields on the same cache line as well as grouping the rarely accessed members. This was seen to address a regression on a concurrent unlink intensive workload.
[Commit 99c228a994ec]


fs/fuse: improved scalability

Two changes that have performance visible effects went in. The first series changes some of the protections for background requests. This allows async reads not take the fuseconn lock. Secondly implement a hash table for processing requests which was seen to address a 20% time spent in request_find() under some workloads with Virtuozzo storage over rdma.
[Commit e287179afe21 2a23f2b8adbe 2b30a533148a ae2dffa39485 63825b4e1da5 c59fd85e4fd0 be2ff42c5d6e]

24 Feb 2019 11:53pm GMT

22 Feb 2019

feedKernel Planet

Pete Zaitcev: Mu!

In the past several days, I innaugurated a private Fediverse instance, "Mu", running Pleroma for now. Although Mastodon is the dominant implementation, Pleroma is far easier to install, and uses less memory on small, private instances. By doing this, I'm bucking the trend of people hating to run their own infrastructure. Well, I do run my own e-mail service, so, what the heck, might as well join the Fediverse.

So far, it was pretty fun, but Pleroma has problem spots. For example, Pleroma has a concept of "local accounts" and "remote accounts": local ones are normal, into which users log in at the instance, and remote ones mirror accounts on other instances. This way, if users Alice@Mu and Bob@Mu follow user zaitcev@SLC, Mu creates a "remote" account UnIqUeStRiNg@Mu, which tracks zaitcev@SLC, so Alice and Bob subscribe to it locally. This permits to send zaitcev's updates over the network only once. Makes sense, right? Well... I have a "stuck" remote account now at Mu, let's call it Xprime@Mu and posit that it follows X@SPC. Updates posted by X@SPC are reflected in Xprime@Mu, but if Alice@Mu tries to follow X@SPC, she does not see updates that Xprime@Mu receives (the updates are not reflected in Alice's friends/main timeline) [1]. I asked at #pleroma about it, but all they could suggest was to try and resubscribe. I think I need to unsubscribe and purge Xprime@Mu somehow. Then, when Alice resubscribes, Pleroma will re-create a remote, say Xbis@Mu, and things hopefully ought to work. Well, maybe. I need to examine the source to be sure.

Unfortnately, aside from being somewhat complex by its nature, Pleroma is written in Elixir, which is to Erlang what Kotlin is to Java, I gather. Lain explains it thus:

As I had written a social network in Ruby for my work at around that time, I wanted to apply my [negative] experience to a new project. [...] This was also to get some experience with Elixir and the Erlang ecosystem, which seemed like a great fit for a fediverse server - and I think it is.

and to re-iterate:

When I started writing Pleroma I was already writing a social network in Ruby for my day job. Because of that, I knew a lot about the pain points of doing it with Ruby, mostly the bad performance for anything involving concurrency. I had written a Bittorrent DHT client in Elixir, so I knew that it would work well for this kind of software. I was also happy to work with functional programming again, which I like very much.

Anyway, it's all water under the bridge, and if I want to understand why Xprime@Mu is stuck, I need to learn Elixir. Early signs are not that good. Right away, it uses its own control entity that replaces make(1), packaging, and a few other things, called "mix". Sasuga desu, as they say in my weeb neighbourhood. Every goddamn language does that nowadays.


[1] It's trickier, actually. For an inexplicable reason, Alice sees some updates by X: for example, re-posts.

22 Feb 2019 9:14pm GMT

Pavel Machek: Certified danger

I suspected Linux Foundation went to the dark side when they started strange deals with Microsoft. But I'm pretty sure they went to dark side now. https://venturebeat.com/2019/02/21/linux-foundation-elisa/ If Linux can be certified for safety-critical stuff, it means your certification requirements are _way_ too low. People are using microkernels for critical stuff for a reason...

22 Feb 2019 1:38pm GMT

11 Feb 2019

feedKernel Planet

Pete Zaitcev: Feynman on discussions among great men

One of the first experiences I had in this project at Princeton was meeting great men. I had never met very many great men before. But there was an evaluation committee that had to try to help us along, and help us ultimately decide which way we were going to separate the uranium. This committee had men like Compton and Tolman and Smyth and Urey and Rabi and Oppenheimer on it. I would sit in because I understood the theory of how our process of separating isotopes worked, and so they'd ask me questions and talk about it. In these discussions one man would make a point. Then Compton, for example, would explain a different point of view. He would say it should be this way, and was perfectly right. Another guy would say, well, maybe, but there's this other possibility we have to consider against it.

So everybody is disagreeing, all around the table. I am surprised and disturbed that Compton doesn't repeat and emphasize his point. Finally, at the end, Tolman, who's the chairman, would say, ``Well, having heard all these arguments, I guess it's true that Compton's argument is the best of all, and now we have to go ahead.''

It was such a shock to me to see that a committee of men could present a whole lot of ideas, each one thinking of a new facet, while remembering what the other fella said, so that, at the end, the discussion is made as to which idea was the best - summing it all up - without having to say it three times. These were very great men indeed.

Life on l-k before CoC.

11 Feb 2019 7:52pm GMT

11 Nov 2011

feedLinux Today

Tech Comics: "How to Live with Non-Geeks"

Datamation: Geeks must realize that non-geeks simply don't understand some very basics things.

11 Nov 2011 11:00pm GMT

How To Activate Screen Saver In Ubuntu 11.10

AddictiveTip: Ubuntu 11.10 does not come with a default screen saver, and even Gnome 3 provides nothing but a black screen when your system is idle.

11 Nov 2011 10:00pm GMT

XFCE: Your Lightweight, Speedy, Fully-Fledged Linux Desktop

MakeUseOf: As far as Linux goes, customization is king

11 Nov 2011 9:00pm GMT

Fedora Scholarship Recognizes Students for Their Contributions to Open Source Software

Red Hat: The Fedora Scholarship is awarded to one student each year to assist with the recipient's college or university education.

11 Nov 2011 8:00pm GMT

Digital Divide Persists Even as Broadband Adoption Grows

Datamation: New report from Dept. of Commerce shows that the 'have nots' - continue to have not when it comes to Internet.

11 Nov 2011 7:00pm GMT

Why GNOME refugees love Xfce

The Register: Thunar rather than later...

11 Nov 2011 6:00pm GMT

Everything should be open source, says WordPress founder

Between the Lines: "It's a bold statement, but it's the ethos that Mullenweg admirably stuck to, pointing out that sites like Wikipedia replaced Encyclopedia Britannica, and how far Android has gone for mobile."

11 Nov 2011 5:02pm GMT

The Computer I Need

LXer: "Before I had a cell phone I did not realize that I needed one. As of one week ago, I did not realize that I needed a tablet either but I can sense that it might be a similar experience."

11 Nov 2011 4:01pm GMT

GPL violations in Android: Same arguments, different day

IT World: "IP attorney Edward J. Naughton is repeating his arguments that Google's use of Linux kernel header files within Android may be in violation of the GNU General Public License (GPLv2), and tries to discredit Linus Torvalds' thoughts on the matter along the way."

11 Nov 2011 3:04pm GMT

No uTorrent for Linux by Year's End

Softpedia: "When asked why there's no uTorrent client version of Linux users out, BitTorrent Inc. said that the company has other priorities at the moment."

11 Nov 2011 2:01pm GMT

Keep an Eye on Your Server with phpSysInfo

Linux Magazine: "There are quite a few server monitoring solutions out there, but most of them are overkill for keeping an eye on a single personal server."

11 Nov 2011 1:03pm GMT

At long last, Mozilla Releases Lightning 1.0 Calendar

InternetNews: From the 'Date and Time' files:

11 Nov 2011 12:00pm GMT

Richard Stallman's Personal Ad

Editors' Note: You can't make this stuff up...

11 Nov 2011 10:00am GMT

Linux Top 5: Fedora 16 Aims for the Cloud

LinuxPlanet: There are many things to explore on the Linux Planet. This week, a new Fedora release provides plenty of items to examine. The new Fedora release isn't the only new open source release this week, as the Linux Planet welcomes new KDE and Firefox releases as well.

11 Nov 2011 9:00am GMT

Orion Editor Ships in Firefox 8

Planet Orion: Firefox 8 now includes the Orion code editor in its scratchpad feature.

11 Nov 2011 6:00am GMT