23 May 2019

feedLXer Linux News

Space Station welcomes free-flying, Ubuntu-powered autonomous robots

NASA has deployed three free-flying "Astrobee" robots on the ISS for house-keeping tasks. The bots run Ubuntu/ROS and Android 7.1 on Snapdragon-based Inforce modules and a Wandboard and feature 3x payload bays, 6x cameras, and a touchscreen. We haven't heard a news from the IBM Watson connected CIMON social robot since it debuted with a […]

23 May 2019 2:45pm GMT

How to Install VLC Media Player on CentOS 7

VLC is a popular open source multimedia player and streaming media server.

23 May 2019 1:30pm GMT

Zombieload, Nextcloud, Peppermint 10, KDE Plasma, IPFire, ArcoLinux, LuneOS | This Week in Linux 67

TWinL67: Zombieload, Nextcloud, Peppermint 10, KDE Plasma, IPFire, ArcoLinux, LuneOS, SouthEast LinuxFest, Superpaper, Pinephone, Valve: SteamOS, Steam Client Beta, Proton, id Software Going Vulkan

23 May 2019 12:16pm GMT

Bringing the Benefits of Linux Containers to Operational Technology

Linux container technology was introduced more than a decade ago and has recently jumped in adoption in IT environments....

23 May 2019 11:02am GMT

openSUSE Leap 15.1 Officially Released, Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1

The openSUSE Project announced today the release and general availability of the openSUSE Leap 15.1 operating system, the first minor point release to the openSUSE Leap 15 series.

23 May 2019 9:47am GMT

Kubernetes security: 4 strategic tips

Kubernetes security experts share the tips that will help you avoid trouble - and maybe even build support for security across your organization.

23 May 2019 8:33am GMT

How to Install NodeBB on Debian 9

In this tutorial we will describe the steps of installing NodeBB, along with all of its prerequisites on a Debian 9 VPS. NodeBB is a free and open-source discussion platform that utilizes web sockets for instant interactions and real-time notifications.

23 May 2019 7:19am GMT

How to use Vokoscreen to Record Videos on Ubuntu

Vokoscreen is a screen recording tool that can be used to record educational videos, live recordings of the browser, installation, videoconferences, etc. In this article, we will explain how you can install and use Vokoscreen on Ubuntu.

23 May 2019 6:04am GMT

Kali Linux Ethical Hacking OS Now Supports More Than 50 Android Devices

Offensive Security have released the second maintenance update to the Kali Linux 2019 operating system, adding all the latest software releases, GNU/Linux technologies, and other enhancements.

23 May 2019 4:50am GMT

Setup Ruby on Rails Development environment with Docker and Docker Compose on Ubuntu

In this tutorial, I will show you how to set up a development environment for Ruby on Rails applications using Docker and Docker compose. We will be using Ubuntu 18.04 as the hosts operating system.

23 May 2019 3:36am GMT

How to install DNS server on RHEL 8 Linux

This guide will show how to install and configure a DNS Server in RHEL-8 in caching mode only or as single DNS Server, no master-slave configuration. A reverse and forward zone example is provided.

23 May 2019 2:21am GMT

Kali Linux 2019.2 Release And What’s New

Kali Linux is a Debian-derived Linux distribution designed for digital forensics and penetration testing. Kali Linux is an open source project that is maintained and funded by Offensive Security, a provider of world-class information security training and penetration testing services.

23 May 2019 1:07am GMT

22 May 2019

feedLXer Linux News

Convert Markdown files to word processor docs using pandoc

If you live your life in plaintext, there invariably comes a time when someone asks for a word processor document. I run into this issue frequently, especially at the Day JobTM. Although I've introduced one of the development teams I work with to a Docs Like Code workflow for writing and reviewing release notes, there are a small number of people who have no interest in GitHub or working with Markdown.read more

22 May 2019 11:53pm GMT

Drill: New Desktop File Search Utility That Uses Clever Crawling Instead Of Indexing

Drill is a new file search utility that uses "clever crawling" instead of indexing.The Drill developer, Federico Santamorena, says that after switching to Linux, he had almost everything he needed, minus a fast desktop-oriented search tool, so he created clone of "Everything" that runs on Linux (as well as Windows and macOS), called, Drill.

22 May 2019 10:38pm GMT

How to Tail Multiple Files

Learn two different methods used to tail log files in Linux.

22 May 2019 9:24pm GMT

Designing a Source-to-Image build for a Go application

In my first article in this series about Source-to-Image (S2I), we examined the required files and discussed how the S2I standard works with any programming language, from Python to Ruby to Go. Now let's explore designing an S2I build specifically for a Go application. A disclaimer: I still like to call Go "Golang" even though it's not officially called that.read more

22 May 2019 8:10pm GMT

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019

The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing "sold out" recently because the cap on early bird registrations
was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year's conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.

LPC will be held in Lisbon, Portugal from Monday, September 9 through Wednesday, September 11.

We hope to see you there!

22 May 2019 1:03pm GMT

20 May 2019

feedKernel Planet

James Morris: Linux Security Summit 2019 North America: CFP / OSS Early Bird Registration

The LSS North America 2019 CFP is currently open, and you have until May 31st to submit your proposal. (That's the end of next week!)

If you're planning on attending LSS NA in San Diego, note that the Early Bird registration for Open Source Summit (which we're co-located with) ends today.

You can of course just register for LSS on its own, here.

20 May 2019 8:56pm GMT

Linux Plumbers Conference: Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the Tracing Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Its return to Linux Plumbers shows that tracing is not finished in Linux, and there continue to be challenging problems to solve.

There's a broad list of ways to perform Tracing in Linux. From the original mainline Linux tracer, Ftrace, to profiling tools like perf, more complex customized tracing like BPF and out-of-tree tracers like LTTng, systemtap, and Dtrace. Part of the trouble with tracing within Linux is that there is so much to choose from. Each of these have their own audience, but there is a lot of overlap. This year's theme is to find those common areas and combine them into common utilities.

There is also a lot of new work that is happening and discussions between top maintainers will help keep everyone in sync, and provide good direction for the future.

Expected topics include:

Come and join us and not only learn but help direct the future progress of tracing inside the Linux kernel and beyond!

If you have another tracing topic idea, please send it to Steven Rostedt: rostedt@goodmis.org .

We hope to see you there!

20 May 2019 5:37pm GMT

Pete Zaitcev: Google Fi

Seen an amusing blog post today on the topic of the hideous debacle that is Google Fi (on top of being a virtual network). Here's the best part though:

About a year ago I tried to get my parents to switch from AT&T to Google Fi. I even made a spreadsheet for my dad (who likes those sorts of things) about how much money he could save. He wasn't interested. His one point was that at anytime he can go in and get help from an AT&T rep. I kept asking "Who cares? Why would you ever need that?". Now I know. He was paying almost $60 a month premium for the opportunity to able to talk to a real person, face-to-face! I would gladly pay that now.

Respect your elders!

20 May 2019 3:39pm GMT

Ted Tso: Switching to Hugo

With the demise of Google+, I've decided to try to resurrect my blog. Previously, I was using Wordpress, but I've decided that it's just too risky from a security perspective. So I've decided my blog over to Hugo.

A consequence of this switch is that all of the Wordpress comments have been dropped, at least for now.

20 May 2019 3:19am GMT

14 May 2019

feedKernel Planet

Dave Airlie (blogspot): Senior Job in Red Hat graphics team

We have a job in our team, it's a pretty senior role, definitely want people with lots of experience. Great place to work,ignore any possible future mergers :-)

https://global-redhat.icims.com/jobs/68911/principal-software-engineer/job?mobile=false&width=1526&height=500&bga=true&needsRedirect=false&jan1offset=600&jun1offset=600

14 May 2019 9:07pm GMT

10 May 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: RISC-V microconference accepted for the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

The open nature of the RISC-V ecosystem has allowed contributions from both academia and industry leading to an unprecedented number of new hardware design proposals in a very short time span. Linux support is the key to enabling these new hardware options. Since last year's Plumbers, many kernel features were added to RISC-V. To name a few, we now have out-of-box 32-bit and eBPF support, some key issues with Linux boot process have been addressed, and hypervisor support is on its way.

Last year's RISC-V microconference was such a success that we would like to repeat that again this year by focusing on finding solutions and discussing ideas that require kernel changes.

Topics for this year microconference are expected to cover:

If you're interested in participating in this microconference or have other topics to propose, please contact Atish Patra (atish.patra@wdc.com) or Palmer Dabbelt (palmer@dabbelt.com)

LPC will be held in Lisbon, Portugal from Monday, September 9 through Wednesday, September 11.

We hope to see you there!

10 May 2019 7:55pm GMT

09 May 2019

feedKernel Planet

Davidlohr Bueso: Linux v5.1: Performance Goodies

sched/wake_q: reduce atomic operations for special users

Some core users of wake_qs, futex and rwsems were incurring in double task reference counting - which was a side effect for safety reasons. This change levels the call's performance with the rest of the users.
[Commit 07879c6a3740]

irq: Speedup for interrupt statistics in /proc/stat

On large systems with a large amount of interrupts the readout of /proc/stat takes a long time to sum up the interrupt statistics. The reason for this is that interrupt statistics are accounted per cpu. So the /proc/stat logic has to sum up the interrupt stats for each interrupt. While applications shouldn't really be doing this to a point where it creates bottlenecks, the fix was fairly easy.
[Commit 1136b0728969]

mm/swapoff: replace quadratic complexity for lineal

try_to_unuse() is of quadratic complexity, with a lot of wasted effort. It unuses swap entries one by one, potentially iterating over all the page tables for all the processes in the system for each one. With these changes, it now iterates over the system's mms once, unusing all the affected entries as it walks each set of page tables.

Improvements show time reductions for swapoff being called on a swap partition containing about 6G of data, from 8 to 3 minutes.
[Commit c5bf121e4350 b56a2d8af914]

mm: make pinned_vm an atomic counter

This reduces some of the bulky mmap_sem games that are played when, mostly rdma, deals with the pinned pages counter. It also pivots on not relying on the lock for get user pages operations.
[Commit 70f8a3ca68d3 3a2a1e90564e b95df5e3e459]

drivers/async: NUMA aware async_schedule calls

Asynchronous function calls reduces, primarily, kernel boot time by safely doing out of order operations, such as device discovery. This series improves the NUMA locality by being able to schedule device specific init work on specific NUMA nodes in order to improve performance of memory initialization. Significant init reduction times for persistent memory were seen.
[Commit 3451a495ef24 ed88747c6c4a ef0ff68351be 8204e0c1113d 6be9238e5cb6 c37e20eaf4b2 8b9ec6b73277 af87b9a7863c 57ea974fb871]

lib/iov_iter: optimize page_copy_sane()

This avoid cacheline misses when dereferencing a struct page, via compound_head(), when possible. Apparently the overhead was visible on TCP doing recvmsg() calls dealing with GRO packets.
[Commit 6daef95b8c91]

fs/epoll: reduce lock contention in ep_poll_callback()

This patch increases the bandwidth of events which can be delivered from sources to the poller by adding poll items in a lockless way to the ready list; via clever ways of xchg() while holding a reader rwlock . This improves scenarios with multiple threads generating IO events which are delivered to a single threaded epoll_wait()er.
[Commit c141175d011f c3e320b61581 a218cc491420]

fs/nfs: reduce cost of listing huge directories (readdirplus)

When listing very large directories via NFS, clients may take a long time to complete. Most of the culprit is in various degrees of libc's readdir(2) reading 32k files at a time. To improve performance and reduce the amount of rpc calls, NFS readdirplus rpc will ask for a large data (more than 32k), the data can fill more than one page, the cached pages can be used for next readdir call. Benchmarks show rpc calls decreasing by 85% while listing a directory with 300k files.
[Commit be4c2d4723a4]

fs/pnfs: Avoid read/modify/write when it is not necessary

When testing with fio, Throughput of overwrite (both buffered and O_SYNC) is noticeably improved.
[Commit 97ae91bbf3a7 2cde04e90d5b]

09 May 2019 8:10pm GMT

Davidlohr Bueso: Linux v5.0: Performance Goodies

mm/page-alloc: reduce zone->lock contention

Contention in the page allocator was seen in a network traffic report, in which order-0 allocations are being freed by back to the directly to the buddy, instead of making use of percpu-pages in the page_frag_free() call. Aside from eliminating the contention, it was seen to improve some microbenchmarks.
[Commit 65895b67ad27]

mm/mremap: improve scalability on large regions

When THP is disabled, move_page_tables() can bottleneck a large mremap() call, as it will copy each pte at a time. This patch speeds up the performance by copying at the PMD level when possible. Up to 20x speedups were seen when doing a 1Gb remap.
[Commit 2c91bd4a4e2e]

mm: improve anti-fragmentation

Given sufficient time or an adverse workload, memory gets fragmented and the long-term success of high-order allocations degrades. Overall the series reduces external fragmentation causing events by over 94% on 1 and 2 socket machines, which in turn impacts high-order allocation success rates over the long term.
[Commit 6bb154504f8b a921444382b4 0a79cdad5eb2 1c30844d2dfe]

mm/hotplug: optimize clear hw_poisoned_pages()

During hotplug remove, the kernel will loop for the respective number of pages looking for poisoned pages. Check the atomic hint in case this are none, and optimize the function.
[Commit 5eb570a8d924]

mm/ksm: Replace jhash2 with xxhash

xxhash is an extremely fast non-cryptographic hash algorithm for checksumming, making it suitable to use in kernel samepage merging. On a custom KSM benchmark, throughput was seen to improve from 1569 to 8770 MB/s.

genirq/affinity: Spread IRQs to all available NUMA nodes

If the number of NUMA nodes exceeds the number of MSI/MSI-X interrupts which are allocated for a device, the interrupt affinity spreading code fails to spread them across all nodes. NUMA nodes above the number of interrupts are all assigned to hardware queue 0 and therefore NUMA node 0, which results in bad performance and has CPU hotplug implications. Fix this by assigning via round-robin.
[Commit b82592199032]

fs/epoll: Optimizations for epoll_wait()

Various performance changes oriented towards improving the waiting side, such that contention epoll waitqueue (previously ep->lock) spinlock is reduced. This produces pretty good results for various concurrent epoll_wait(2) benchmarks.

lib/sbitmap: Various optimizations

Two optimizations to the sbitmap core were introduced, which is used, for example, by the block-mq tags. The first optimizes wakeup checks and adds to the core api, while the second introduces batched clearing of bits, trading 64 atomic bitops for 2 cmpxchg calls.

fs/locks: Avoid thundering herd wakeups

When one thread releases a lock on a given file, it wakes up all other threads that are waiting (classic thundering-herd) - one will get the lock and the others go to sleep. The overhead starts being noticeable with increasing thread counts. These changes create a tree of pending lock request in which siblings don't conflict and each lock request does conflict with its parent. When a lock is released, only requests which don't conflict with each other a woken.

Testing shows that lock-acquisitions-per-second is now fairly stable even as number of contending process goes to 1000. Without this patch, locks-per-second drops off steeply after a few 10s of processes. Micro-benchmarks can be found per the lockscale program, which tests fcntl(..., F_OFD_SETLKW, ...) and flock(..., LOCK_EX) calls.

arm64/lib: improve crc32 performance for deep pipelines

This change replace most branches with a branchless code path that overlaps 16 byte loads to process the first (length % 32) bytes, and process the remainder using a loop that processes 32 bytes at a time.
[Commit efdb25efc764]

09 May 2019 8:10pm GMT

Michael Kerrisk (manpages): man-pages-5.01 is released

I've released man-pages-5.01. The release tarball is available on kernel.org. The browsable online pages can be found on man7.org. The Git repository for man-pages is available on kernel.org.

This release resulted from patches, bug reports, reviews, and comments from just over 20 contributors. The release is smaller release than typical; it includes just over 70 commits that changed just over 40 pages.

The most notable of the changes in man-pages-5.01 is the following:


09 May 2019 12:10pm GMT

04 May 2019

feedKernel Planet

Pete Zaitcev: YAML

Seen in a blog entry by Martin Tournoij (via):

I've been happily programming Python for over a decade, so I'm used to significant whitespace, but sometimes I'm still struggling with YAML. In Python the drawbacks and loss of clarity are contained by not having functions that are several pages long, but data or configuration files have no such natural limits to their length.

[...]

YAML may seem 'simple' and 'obvious' when glancing at a basic example, but turns out it's not. The YAML spec is 23,449 words; for comparison, TOML is 3,339 words, JSON is 1,969 words, and XML is 20,603 words.

There's more where the above came from. In particular, the portability issues are rather surprising.

Unfortunately for me, OpenStack TripleO is based on YAML.

04 May 2019 6:48pm GMT

Linux Plumbers Conference: BPF microconference accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the BPF microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Last year's BPF microconference was such a success that it will be held again this year.

BPF along with its just-in-time (JIT) compiler inside the Linux kernel allows for versatile programmability of the kernel and plays a major role in networking (XDP, tc BPF, etc.), tracing (kprobes, uprobes, tracepoints) and security (seccomp, landlock) subsystems.

Since last year's Plumbers Conference, many of the discussed improvements have been tackled and found their way into the Linux kernel such as significant steps towards allowing for a compile-once paradigm with the help of BTF and global data support as well as considerable verifier scalability improvements to name a few. The topics proposed for this year's event include:

- libbpf, loader unification
- Standardized BPF ELF format
- Multi-object semantics and linker-style logic for BPF loaders
- Verifier scalability work towards 1 million instructions
- Sleepable BPF programs
- BPF loop support
- Indirect calls in BPF
- Unprivileged BPF
- BPF type format (BTF)
- BPF timers
- bpftool
- LLVM BPF backend, JITs and BPF offloading
- and more

Come join us and participate in the decision making of one of the most cutting edge advancements in the Linux kernel!

See here for a detailed preview of the proposed and accepted topics. Please feel free to submit your discussion proposals to Alexei or Daniel: lpc-bpf@vger.kernel.org

We hope to see you there!

04 May 2019 1:31am GMT

02 May 2019

feedKernel Planet

Pete Zaitcev: Fraud in the material world

Wow, they better not be building Boeings from this crap:

NASA Launch Services Program (LSP) investigators have determined the technical root cause for the Taurus XL launch failures of NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) and Glory missions in 2009 and 2011, respectively: faulty materials provided by aluminum manufacturer, Sapa Profiles (SPI). LSP's technical investigation led to the involvement of NASA's Office of the Inspector General and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). DOJ's efforts, recently made public, resulted in the resolution of criminal charges and alleged civil claims against SPI, and its agreement to pay $46 million to the U.S. government and other commercial customers. This relates to a 19-year scheme that included falsifying thousands of certifications for aluminum extrusions to hundreds of customers.

BTW, those costly failures probably hastened the sale of Orbital to ATK in 2015. There were repercussions for the personnell running the Taurus program as well.

02 May 2019 5:52pm GMT

Daniel Vetter: Upstream First

lwn.net just featured an article the sustainability of open source, which seems to be a bit a topic in various places since a while. I've made a keynote at Siemens Linux Community Event 2018 last year which lends itself to a different take on all this:

The slides for those who don't like videos.

This talk was mostly aimed at managers of engineering teams and projects with fairly little experience in shipping open source, and much less experience in shipping open source through upstream cross vendor projects like the kernel. It goes through all the usual failings and missteps and explains why an upstream first strategy is the right one, but with a twist: Instead of technical reasons, it's all based on economical considerations of why open source is succeeding. Fundamentally it's not about the better software, or the cheaper prize, or that the software freedoms are a good thing worth supporting.

Instead open source is eating the world because it enables a much more competitive software market. And all the best practices around open development are just to enable that highly competitive market. Instead of arguing that open source has open development and strongly favours public discussions because that results in better collaboration and better software we put on the economic lens, and private discussions become insider trading and collusions. And that's just not considered cool in a competitive market. Similar arguments can be made with everything else going on in open source projects.

Circling back to the list of articles at the top I think it's worth looking at the sustainability of open source as an economic issue of an extremely competitive market, in other words, as a market failure: Occasionally the result is that no one gets paid, the customers only receive a sub-par product with all costs externalized - costs like keeping up with security issues. And like with other market failures, a solution needs to be externally imposed through regulations, taxation and transfers to internalize all the costs again into the product's prize. Frankly no idea how that would look like in practice though.

Anyway, just a thought, but good enough a reason to finally publish the recording and slides of my talk, which covers this just in passing in an offhand remark.

Update: Fix slides link.

02 May 2019 12:00am GMT

24 Apr 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: Lots of microconferences proposed for LPC

Microconference proposals have been rolling in for the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, but it is not too late to submit more. So far, we have the following microconference proposals:

If you have suggestions for topics to be discussed in those microconferences, please email contact@linuxplumbersconf.org to connect with the microconference runners.

Other microconference topic areas are still welcome, please go to the CFP page to submit yours today!

24 Apr 2019 1:36pm GMT

13 Apr 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: Registration is open for the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

Registration is now open for the 2019 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC). It will be held September 9-11 in Lisbon, Portugal with dedicated Linux Kernel Summit and Networking tracks, as was done last year, along with the microconferences and refereed presentations that are LPC standards. Go to the registration site to sign up or the attend page for more information on dates and quotas for the various registration types. Early registration will run until June 30 or until the quota is filled.

Note that the CFPs for microconferences, refereed track talks, and BoFs are still open, please see this page for more information.

As always, please contact the organizing committee if you have questions.

13 Apr 2019 9:23am GMT

11 Nov 2011

feedLinux Today

Tech Comics: "How to Live with Non-Geeks"

Datamation: Geeks must realize that non-geeks simply don't understand some very basics things.

11 Nov 2011 11:00pm GMT

How To Activate Screen Saver In Ubuntu 11.10

AddictiveTip: Ubuntu 11.10 does not come with a default screen saver, and even Gnome 3 provides nothing but a black screen when your system is idle.

11 Nov 2011 10:00pm GMT

XFCE: Your Lightweight, Speedy, Fully-Fledged Linux Desktop

MakeUseOf: As far as Linux goes, customization is king

11 Nov 2011 9:00pm GMT

Fedora Scholarship Recognizes Students for Their Contributions to Open Source Software

Red Hat: The Fedora Scholarship is awarded to one student each year to assist with the recipient's college or university education.

11 Nov 2011 8:00pm GMT

Digital Divide Persists Even as Broadband Adoption Grows

Datamation: New report from Dept. of Commerce shows that the 'have nots' - continue to have not when it comes to Internet.

11 Nov 2011 7:00pm GMT

Why GNOME refugees love Xfce

The Register: Thunar rather than later...

11 Nov 2011 6:00pm GMT

Everything should be open source, says WordPress founder

Between the Lines: "It's a bold statement, but it's the ethos that Mullenweg admirably stuck to, pointing out that sites like Wikipedia replaced Encyclopedia Britannica, and how far Android has gone for mobile."

11 Nov 2011 5:02pm GMT

The Computer I Need

LXer: "Before I had a cell phone I did not realize that I needed one. As of one week ago, I did not realize that I needed a tablet either but I can sense that it might be a similar experience."

11 Nov 2011 4:01pm GMT

GPL violations in Android: Same arguments, different day

IT World: "IP attorney Edward J. Naughton is repeating his arguments that Google's use of Linux kernel header files within Android may be in violation of the GNU General Public License (GPLv2), and tries to discredit Linus Torvalds' thoughts on the matter along the way."

11 Nov 2011 3:04pm GMT

No uTorrent for Linux by Year's End

Softpedia: "When asked why there's no uTorrent client version of Linux users out, BitTorrent Inc. said that the company has other priorities at the moment."

11 Nov 2011 2:01pm GMT

Keep an Eye on Your Server with phpSysInfo

Linux Magazine: "There are quite a few server monitoring solutions out there, but most of them are overkill for keeping an eye on a single personal server."

11 Nov 2011 1:03pm GMT

At long last, Mozilla Releases Lightning 1.0 Calendar

InternetNews: From the 'Date and Time' files:

11 Nov 2011 12:00pm GMT

Richard Stallman's Personal Ad

Editors' Note: You can't make this stuff up...

11 Nov 2011 10:00am GMT

Linux Top 5: Fedora 16 Aims for the Cloud

LinuxPlanet: There are many things to explore on the Linux Planet. This week, a new Fedora release provides plenty of items to examine. The new Fedora release isn't the only new open source release this week, as the Linux Planet welcomes new KDE and Firefox releases as well.

11 Nov 2011 9:00am GMT

Orion Editor Ships in Firefox 8

Planet Orion: Firefox 8 now includes the Orion code editor in its scratchpad feature.

11 Nov 2011 6:00am GMT