16 Jul 2019

feedLXer Linux News

An Ansible reference guide, CI/CD with Ansible Tower and GitHub, and more news

We're always amazed to find and hear what people are achieving with Ansible. Naturally, we get lots of feedback from customers, but more often we find it is the community who pushes Ansible even further.read more

16 Jul 2019 5:28pm GMT

IBM Announces Three New Open Source Projects for Developing Apps for Kubernetes and the Data Asset eXchange (DAX), the Linux Foundation Is Having a Sysadmin Day Sale, London Launches Open-Source Homeb

News briefs for July 16, 2019.

16 Jul 2019 4:13pm GMT

What Is AppImage in Linux?

On Windows, there are portable apps that you can run without installation. In Linux, Appimage is portable, too, but with a different architecture.

16 Jul 2019 2:59pm GMT

Explainer: What is post-quantum cryptography?

Are you familiar with post-quantum cryptography? The race is on to create new ways to protect data and communications from the threat posed by super-powerful quantum computers. Get the details in this article.

16 Jul 2019 1:45pm GMT

Data as the new oil: The danger behind the mantra

Too many CIOs do nothing with the data - or store it unsafely. Ask these critical questions about your data practices

16 Jul 2019 12:30pm GMT

Octa-core MediaTek i700 SoC offers APU 2.0 for edge AI

MediaTek unveiled an "AI IoT platform i700" SoC for edge AI with 2x 2.2GHz Cortex-A75 cores and 6x 2.0GHz -A55 cores plus a PowerVR GM9446, a 970MHz ISP, and a MediaTek APU 2.0 for AI acceleration. MediaTek recently announced a powerful octa-core Arm that is intended not for smartphones but for edge AI systems. The […]

16 Jul 2019 11:16am GMT

An AI Wizard of Words

A look at using OpenAI's Generative Pretrained Transformer 2 (GPT-2) to generate text.

16 Jul 2019 10:02am GMT

Save and load Python data with JSON

JSON stands for JavaScript Object Notation. This format is a popular method of storing data in key-value arrangements so it can be parsed easily later. Don't let the name fool you, though: You can use JSON in Python-not just JavaScript-as an easy way to store data, and this article demonstrates how to get started.First, take a look at this simple JSON snippet:read more

16 Jul 2019 8:47am GMT

Windows 7 Enters the Last Six Months of Support

Windows 7 has officially entered the last six months of support, as the 2009 operating system is projected to be retired on January 14, 2020.

16 Jul 2019 7:34am GMT

Security bootcamp: 8 must-read books for leaders

Hackers increasingly target individuals as weak links. As the number of breaches and their costs continue to spike, it's time for leaders of all kinds to learn more about security

16 Jul 2019 6:20am GMT

Quad-camera rig taps into Jetson AGX Xavier for deep learning

E-con has launched a Linux-driven, AI-enabled "SurveilsQUAD" camera system for the Nvidia Jetson AGX Xavier or TX2 with 4x 2-megapixel cameras with HD or FHD resolution connected via MIPI-CSI-2. E-con Systems has begun shipping a SurveilsQUAD (e-CAM20_CUXVR) camera system with a V4L2 Linux driver and a sample Linux app with source. Like the robotics focused […]

16 Jul 2019 5:06am GMT

If You Are a Linux User, Make Your Next PC Powered By AMD

I bought a laptop powered by AMD. My experience with it on Linux has been wonderful so far. This is my story, and why I think that you should go with AMD for your next PC too.

16 Jul 2019 3:51am GMT

What movie genre does your typical day most resemble?

Have you ever daydreamed about what type of movie "A Day in the Life of [Your Name Here]" would be? As a sysadmin or other IT professional, your day can vary depending on what issues arise. Does your workday typically play out as planned, or does it tend to go off script? Which movie genre best describes your typical day?Superhero blockbuster: When you save the day after Thanos deletes the world's DNS records, you might feel like one of the Avengers.read more

16 Jul 2019 2:37am GMT

Cheat.sh Shows Cheat Sheets On The Command Line Or In Your Code Editor

cheat.sh provides access to community-driven cheat sheets and snippets for Linux/UNIX commands and many programming languages, using various interfaces.

16 Jul 2019 1:23am GMT

How to setup DHCP server on Ubuntu

In this article, we will see how to install a DHCP server in Ubuntu and configure one client to obtain IP address automatically from that DHCP server. We will use Ubuntu 18.04 LTS describing the procedure mentioned in this article.

16 Jul 2019 12:08am GMT

15 Jul 2019

feedLXer Linux News

Tizonia – powerful open source cloud music player for the Linux terminal

The Linux platform has matured into an excellent way of listening to streaming music services. There are clients available for most of the popular music streaming services. But what if you want a single app that covers the very popular ones without straying away from the Linux terminal. Step forward Tizonia.

15 Jul 2019 10:54pm GMT

10 Jul 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: Power Management and Thermal Control Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the Power Management and Thermal Control Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Power management and thermal control are important areas in the Linux ecosystem to help improve the environment of the planet. In recent years, computer systems have been becoming more and more complex and thermally challenged at the same time and the energy efficiency expectations regarding them have been growing. This trend is likely to continue in the foreseeable future and despite the progress made in the power-management and thermal-control problem space since the Linux Plumbers Conference last year. That progress includes, but is not limited to, the merging of the energy-aware scheduling patch series and CPU idle-time management improvements; there will be more work to do in those areas. This gathering will focus on continuing to have Linux meet the power-management and thermal-control challenge.

Topics for this year include:

Come and join us in the discussion of how to extend the battery life of your laptop while keeping it cool.

We hope to see you there!

10 Jul 2019 10:29pm GMT

09 Jul 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: Android Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the Android Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Android has a long history at Linux Plumbers and has continually made progress as a direct result of these meetings. This year's focus will be a fairly ambitious goal to create a Generic Kernel Image (GKI) (or one kernel to rule them all!). Having a GKI will allow silicon vendors to be independent of the Linux kernel running on the device. As such, kernels could be easily upgraded without requiring any rework of the initial hardware porting efforts. This microconference will also address areas that have been discussed in the past.

The proposed topics include:

Come and join us in the discussion of improving what is arguably the most popular operating system in the world!

We hope to see you there!

09 Jul 2019 11:29pm GMT

Matthew Garrett: Bug bounties and NDAs are an option, not the standard

Zoom had a vulnerability that allowed users on MacOS to be connected to a video conference with their webcam active simply by visiting an appropriately crafted page. Zoom's response has largely been to argue that:

a) There's a setting you can toggle to disable the webcam being on by default, so this isn't a big deal,
b) When Safari added a security feature requiring that users explicitly agree to launch Zoom, this created a poor user experience and so they were justified in working around this (and so introducing the vulnerability), and,
c) The submitter asked whether Zoom would pay them for disclosing the bug, and when Zoom said they'd only do so if the submitter signed an NDA, they declined.

(a) and (b) are clearly ludicrous arguments, but (c) is the interesting one. Zoom go on to mention that they disagreed with the severity of the issue, and in the end decided not to change how their software worked. If the submitter had agreed to the terms of the NDA, then Zoom's decision that this was a low severity issue would have led to them being given a small amount of money and never being allowed to talk about the vulnerability. Since Zoom apparently have no intention of fixing it, we'd presumably never have heard about it. Users would have been less informed, and the world would have been a less secure place.

The point of bug bounties is to provide people with an additional incentive to disclose security issues to companies. But what incentive are they offering? Well, that depends on who you are. For many people, the amount of money offered by bug bounty programs is meaningful, and agreeing to sign an NDA is worth it. For others, the ability to publicly talk about the issue is worth more than whatever the bounty may award - being able to give a presentation on the vulnerability at a high profile conference may be enough to get you a significantly better paying job. Others may be unwilling to sign an NDA on principle, refusing to trust that the company will ever disclose the issue or fix the vulnerability. And finally there are people who can't sign such an NDA - they may have discovered the issue on work time, and employer policies may prohibit them doing so.

Zoom are correct that it's not unusual for bug bounty programs to require NDAs. But when they talk about this being an industry standard, they come awfully close to suggesting that the submitter did something unusual or unreasonable in rejecting their bounty terms. When someone lets you know about a vulnerability, they're giving you an opportunity to have the issue fixed before the public knows about it. They've done something they didn't need to do - they could have just publicly disclosed it immediately, causing significant damage to your reputation and potentially putting your customers at risk. They could potentially have sold the information to a third party. But they didn't - they came to you first. If you want to offer them money in order to encourage them (and others) to do the same in future, then that's great. If you want to tie strings to that money, that's a choice you can make - but there's no reason for them to agree to those strings, and if they choose not to then you don't get to complain about that afterwards. And if they make it clear at the time of submission that they intend to publicly disclose the issue after 90 days, then they're acting in accordance with widely accepted norms. If you're not able to fix an issue within 90 days, that's very much your problem.

If your bug bounty requires people sign an NDA, you should think about why. If it's so you can control disclosure and delay things beyond 90 days (and potentially never disclose at all), look at whether the amount of money you're offering for that is anywhere near commensurate with the value the submitter could otherwise gain from the information and compare that to the reputational damage you'll take from people deciding that it's not worth it and just disclosing unilaterally. And, seriously, never ask for an NDA before you're committing to a specific $ amount - it's never reasonable to ask that someone sign away their rights without knowing exactly what they're getting in return.

tl;dr - a bug bounty should only be one component of your vulnerability reporting process. You need to be prepared for people to decline any restrictions you wish to place on them, and you need to be prepared for them to disclose on the date they initially proposed. If they give you 90 days, that's entirely within industry norms. Remember that a bargain is being struck here - you offering money isn't being generous, it's you attempting to provide an incentive for people to help you improve your security. If you're asking people to give up more than you're offering in return, don't be surprised if they say no.

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09 Jul 2019 9:15pm GMT

Linux Plumbers Conference: Update on LPC 2019 registration waiting list

Here is an update regarding the registration situation for LPC2019.

The considerable interest for participation this year meant that the conference sold out earlier than ever before.

Instead of a small release of late-registration spots, the LPC planning committee has decided to run a waiting list, which will be used as the exclusive method for additional registrations. The planning committee will reach out to individuals on the waiting list and inviting them to register at the regular rate of $550, as spots become available.

With the majority of the Call for Proposals (CfP) still open, it is not yet possible to release passes. The planning committee and microconferences leads are working together to allocate the passes earmarked for microconferences. The Networking Summit and Kernel Summit speakers are yet to be confirmed also.

The planning committee understands that many of those who added themselves to the waiting list wish to find out soon whether they will be issued a pass. We anticipate the first passes to be released on July 22nd at the earliest.

Please follow us on social media, or here on this blog for further updates.

09 Jul 2019 1:36am GMT

08 Jul 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: VFIO/IOMMU/PCI Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the VFIO/IOMMU/PCI Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference!

The PCI interconnect specification and the devices implementing it are incorporating more and more features aimed at high performance systems. This requires the kernel to coordinate the PCI devices, the IOMMUs they are connected to and the VFIO layer used to manage them (for user space access and device pass-through) so that users (and virtual machines) can use them effectively. The kernel interfaces to control PCI devices have to be designed in-sync for all three subsystems, which implies that there are lots of intersections in the design of kernel control paths for VFIO/IOMMU/PCI requiring kernel code design discussions involving the three subsystems at once.

A successful VFIO/IOMMU/PCI Microconference was held at Linux Plumbers in 2017, where:

This year, the microconference will follow up on the previous microconference agendas and focus on ongoing patches review/design aimed at VFIO/IOMMU/PCI subsystems.

Topics for this year include:

Come and join us in the discussion in helping Linux keep up with the new features being added to the PCI interconnect specification.

We hope to see you there!

08 Jul 2019 5:56pm GMT

07 Jul 2019

feedKernel Planet

Matthew Garrett: Creating hardware where no hardware exists

The laptop industry was still in its infancy back in 1990, but it still faced a core problem that we do today - power and thermal management are hard, but also critical to a good user experience (and potentially to the lifespan of the hardware). This is in the days where DOS and Windows had no memory protection, so handling these problems at the OS level would have been an invitation for someone to overwrite your management code and potentially kill your laptop. The safe option was pushing all of this out to an external management controller of some sort, but vendors in the 90s were the same as vendors now and would do basically anything to avoid having to drop an extra chip on the board. Thankfully(?), Intel had a solution.

The 386SL was released in October 1990 as a low-powered mobile-optimised version of the 386. Critically, it included a feature that let vendors ensure that their power management code could run without OS interference. A small window of RAM was hidden behind the VGA memory[1] and the CPU configured so that various events would cause the CPU to stop executing the OS and jump to this protected region. It could then do whatever power or thermal management tasks were necessary and return control to the OS, which would be none the wiser. Intel called this System Management Mode, and we've never really recovered.

Step forward to the late 90s. USB is now a thing, but even the operating systems that support USB usually don't in their installers (and plenty of operating systems still didn't have USB drivers). The industry needed a transition path, and System Management Mode was there for them. By configuring the chipset to generate a System Management Interrupt (or SMI) whenever the OS tried to access the PS/2 keyboard controller, the CPU could then trap into some SMM code that knew how to talk to USB, figure out what was going on with the USB keyboard, fake up the results and pass them back to the OS. As far as the OS was concerned, it was talking to a normal keyboard controller - but in reality, the "hardware" it was talking to was entirely implemented in software on the CPU.

Since then we've seen even more stuff get crammed into SMM, which is annoying because in general it's much harder for an OS to do interesting things with hardware if the CPU occasionally stops in order to run invisible code to touch hardware resources you were planning on using, and that's even ignoring the fact that operating systems in general don't really appreciate the entire world stopping and then restarting some time later without any notification. So, overall, SMM is a pain for OS vendors.

Change of topic. When Apple moved to x86 CPUs in the mid 2000s, they faced a problem. Their hardware was basically now just a PC, and that meant people were going to try to run their OS on random PC hardware. For various reasons this was unappealing, and so Apple took advantage of the one significant difference between their platforms and generic PCs. x86 Macs have a component called the System Management Controller that (ironically) seems to do a bunch of the stuff that the 386SL was designed to do on the CPU. It runs the fans, it reports hardware information, it controls the keyboard backlight, it does all kinds of things. So Apple embedded a string in the SMC, and the OS tries to read it on boot. If it fails, so does boot[2]. Qemu has a driver that emulates enough of the SMC that you can provide that string on the command line and boot OS X in qemu, something that's documented further here.

What does this have to do with SMM? It turns out that you can configure x86 chipsets to trap into SMM on arbitrary IO port ranges, and older Macs had SMCs in IO port space[3]. After some fighting with Intel documentation[4] I had Coreboot's SMI handler responding to writes to an arbitrary IO port range. With some more fighting I was able to fake up responses to reads as well. And then I took qemu's SMC emulation driver and merged it into Coreboot's SMM code. Now, accesses to the IO port range that the SMC occupies on real hardware generate SMIs, trap into SMM on the CPU, run the emulation code, handle writes, fake up responses to reads and return control to the OS. From the OS's perspective, this is entirely invisible[5]. We've created hardware where none existed.

The tree where I'm working on this is here, and I'll see if it's possible to clean this up in a reasonable way to get it merged into mainline Coreboot. Note that this only handles the SMC - actually booting OS X involves a lot more, but that's something for another time.

[1] If the OS attempts to access this range, the chipset directs it to the video card instead of to actual RAM.
[2] It's actually more complicated than that - see here for more.
[3] IO port space is a weird x86 feature where there's an entire separate IO bus that isn't part of the memory map and which requires different instructions to access. It's low performance but also extremely simple, so hardware that has no performance requirements is often implemented using it.
[4] Some current Intel hardware has two sets of registers defined for setting up which IO ports should trap into SMM. I can't find anything that documents what the relationship between them is, but if you program the obvious ones nothing happens and if you program the ones that are hidden in the section about LPC decoding ranges things suddenly start working.
[5] Eh technically a sufficiently enthusiastic OS could notice that the time it took for the access to occur didn't match what it should on real hardware, or could look at the CPU's count of the number of SMIs that have occurred and correlate that with accesses, but good enough

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07 Jul 2019 8:15pm GMT

Linux Plumbers Conference: Scheduler Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the Scheduler Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! The scheduler determines what runs on the CPU at any given time. The lag of your desktop is affected by the scheduler, for example. There are a few different scheduling classes for a user to choose from, such as the default class (SCHED_OTHER) or a real-time class (SCHED_FIFO, SCHED_RT and SCHED_DEADLINE). The deadline scheduler is the newest and allows the user to control the amount of bandwidth received by a task or group of tasks. With cloud computing becoming popular these days, controlling bandwidth of containers or virtual machines is becoming more important. The Real-Time patch is also destined to become mainline, which will add more strain on the scheduling of tasks to make sure that real-time tasks make their deadlines (although, this Microconference will focus on non real-time aspects of the scheduler. Please defer real-time topics to the Real-time Microconference). This requires verification techniques to ensure the scheduler is properly designed.

Topics for this year include:

Come and join us in the discussion of controlling what tasks get to run on your machine and when.

We hope to see you there!

07 Jul 2019 2:51pm GMT

03 Jul 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: RDMA Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the RDMA Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! RDMA has been a microconference at Plumbers for the last three years and will be continuing its productive work for a fourth year. The RDMA meetings at the previous Plumbers have been critical in getting improvements to the RDMA subsystem merged into mainline. These include a new user API, container support, testability/syzkaller, system bootup, Soft iWarp, and more. There are still difficult open issues that need to be resolved, and this year's Plumbers RDMA Microconfernence is sure to come up with answers to these tough problems.

Topics for this year include:

And new developing areas of interest:

Come and join us in the discussion of improving Linux's ability to access direct memory across high-speed networks.

We hope to see you there!

03 Jul 2019 10:54pm GMT

02 Jul 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: Announcing the LPC 2019 registration waiting list

The current pool of registrations for the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference has sold out.

Those not yet registered who wish to attend should fill out the form here to get on the waiting list.

As registration spots open up, the Plumbers organizing committee will allocate them to those on the waiting list with priority given to those who will be participating in microconferences and BoFs.

02 Jul 2019 7:22pm GMT

Linux Plumbers Conference: Preliminary schedule for LPC 2019 has been published

The LPC committee is pleased to announce the preliminary schedule for the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference.

The vast majority of the LPC refereed track talks have been accepted and are listed there. The same is true for microconferences. While there are a few talks and microconferences to be announced, you will find the current overview LPC schedule here. The LPC refereed track talks can be seen here.

The call for proposals (CfP) is still open for the Kernel Summit, Networking Summit, BOFs and topics for accepted microconferences.

As new microconferences, talks, and BOFs are accepted, they will be published to the schedule.

02 Jul 2019 4:48pm GMT

30 Jun 2019

feedKernel Planet

Matthew Garrett: Which smart bulbs should you buy (from a security perspective)

People keep asking me which smart bulbs they should buy. It's a great question! As someone who has, for some reason, ended up spending a bunch of time reverse engineering various types of lightbulb, I'm probably a reasonable person to ask. So. There are four primary communications mechanisms for bulbs: wifi, bluetooth, zigbee and zwave. There's basically zero compelling reasons to care about zwave, so I'm not going to.

Wifi


Advantages: Doesn't need an additional hub - you can just put the bulbs wherever. The bulbs can connect out to a cloud service, so you can control them even if you're not on the same network.
Disadvantages: Only works if you have wifi coverage, each bulb has to have wifi hardware and be configured appropriately.
Which should you get: If you search Amazon for "wifi bulb" you'll get a whole bunch of cheap bulbs. Don't buy any of them. They're mostly based on a custom protocol from Zengge and they're shit. Colour reproduction is bad, there's no good way to use the colour LEDs and the white LEDs simultaneously, and if you use any of the vendor apps they'll proxy your device control through a remote server with terrible authentication mechanisms. Just don't. The ones that aren't Zengge are generally based on the Tuya platform, whose security model is to have keys embedded in some incredibly obfuscated code and hope that nobody can find them. TP-Link make some reasonably competent bulbs but also use a weird custom protocol with hand-rolled security. Eufy are fine but again there's weird custom security. Lifx are the best bulbs, but have zero security on the local network - anyone on your wifi can control the bulbs. If that's something you care about then they're a bad choice, but also if that's something you care about maybe just don't let people you don't trust use your wifi.
Conclusion: If you have to use wifi, go with lifx. Their security is not meaningfully worse than anything else on the market (and they're better than many), and they're better bulbs. But you probably shouldn't go with wifi.

Bluetooth


Advantages: Doesn't need an additional hub. Doesn't need wifi coverage. Doesn't connect to the internet, so remote attack is unlikely.
Disadvantages: Only one control device at a time can connect to a bulb, so harder to share. Control device needs to be in Bluetooth range of the bulb. Doesn't connect to the internet, so you can't control your bulbs remotely.
Which should you get: Again, most Bluetooth bulbs you'll find on Amazon are shit. There's a whole bunch of weird custom protocols and the quality of the bulbs is just bad. If you're going to go with anything, go with the C by GE bulbs. Their protocol is still some AES-encrypted custom binary thing, but they use a Bluetooth controller from Telink that supports a mesh network protocol. This means that you can talk to any bulb in your network and still send commands to other bulbs - the dual advantages here are that you can communicate with bulbs that are outside the range of your control device and also that you can have as many control devices as you have bulbs. If you've bought into the Google Home ecosystem, you can associate them directly with a Home and use Google Assistant to control them remotely. GE also sell a wifi bridge - I have one, but haven't had time to review it yet, so make no assertions around its competence. The colour bulbs are also disappointing, with much dimmer colour output than white output.

Zigbee


Advantages: Zigbee is a mesh protocol, so bulbs can forward messages to each other. The bulbs are also pretty cheap. Zigbee is a standard, so you can obtain bulbs from several vendors that will then interoperate - unfortunately there are actually two separate standards for Zigbee bulbs, and you'll sometimes find yourself with incompatibility issues there.
Disadvantages: Your phone doesn't have a Zigbee radio, so you can't communicate with the bulbs directly. You'll need a hub of some sort to bridge between IP and Zigbee. The ecosystem is kind of a mess, and you may have weird incompatibilities.
Which should you get: Pretty much every vendor that produces Zigbee bulbs also produces a hub for them. Don't get the Sengled hub - anyone on the local network can perform arbitrary unauthenticated command execution on it. I've previously recommended the Ikea Tradfri, which at the time only had local control. They've since added remote control support, and I haven't investigated that in detail. But overall, I'd go with the Philips Hue. Their colour bulbs are simply the best on the market, and their security story seems solid - performing a factory reset on the hub generates a new keypair, and adding local control users requires a physical button press on the hub to allow pairing. Using the Philips hub doesn't tie you into only using Philips bulbs, but right now the Philips bulbs tend to be as cheap (or cheaper) than anything else.

But what about


If you're into tying together all kinds of home automation stuff, then either go with Smartthings or roll your own with Home Assistant. Both are definitely more effort if you only want lighting.

My priority is software freedom


Excellent! There are various bulbs that can run the Espurna or AiLight firmwares, but you'll have to deal with flashing them yourself. You can tie that into Home Assistant and have a completely free stack. If you're ok with your bulbs being proprietary, Home Assistant can speak to most types of bulb without an additional hub (you'll need a supported Zigbee USB stick to control Zigbee bulbs), and will support the C by GE ones as soon as I figure out why my Bluetooth transmissions stop working every so often.

Conclusion


Outside niche cases, just buy a Hue. Philips have done a genuinely good job. Don't buy cheap wifi bulbs. Don't buy a Sengled hub.

(Disclaimer: I mentioned a Google product above. I am a Google employee, but do not work on anything related to Home.)

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30 Jun 2019 8:10pm GMT

26 Jun 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: Databases Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the Databases Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Linux plumbing is heavily important to those who implement databases and their users who expect fast and durable data handling.

Durability is a promise never to lose data after advising a user of a successful update, even in the face of power loss. It requires a full-stack solution from the application to the database, then to Linux (filesystem, VFS, block interface, driver), and on to the hardware.

Fast means getting a database user a response in less that tens of milliseconds, which requires that Linux filesystems, memory and CPU management, and the networking stack do everything with the utmost effectiveness and efficiency.

For all Linux users, there is a benefit in having database developers interact with system developers; it will ensure that the promise of durability and speed are both kept as newer hardware technologies emerge, existing CPU/RAM resources grow, and while data stored grows even faster.

Topics for this Microconference include:

Come and join us in the discussion about making databases run smoother and faster.

We hope to see you there!

26 Jun 2019 3:14pm GMT

25 Jun 2019

feedKernel Planet

James Morris: Linux Security Summit North America 2019: Schedule Published

The schedule for the 2019 Linux Security Summit North America (LSS-NA) is published.

This year, there are some changes to the format of LSS-NA. The summit runs for three days instead of two, which allows us to relax the schedule somewhat while also adding new session types. In addition to refereed talks, short topics, BoF sessions, and subsystem updates, there are now also tutorials (one each day), unconference sessions, and lightning talks.

The tutorial sessions are:

These tutorials will be 90 minutes in length, and they'll run in parallel with unconference sessions on the first two days (when the space is available at the venue).

The refereed presentations and short topics cover a range of Linux security topics including platform boot security, integrity, container security, kernel self protection, fuzzing, and eBPF+LSM.

Some of the talks I'm personally excited about include:

The schedule last year was pretty crammed, so with the addition of the third day we've been able to avoid starting early, and we've also added five minute transitions between talks. We're hoping to maximize collaboration via the more relaxed schedule and the addition of more types of sessions (unconference, tutorials, lightning talks). This is not a conference for simply consuming talks, but to also participate and to get things done (or started).

Thank you to all who submitted proposals. As usual, we had many more submissions than can be accommodated in the available time.

Also thanks to the program committee, who spent considerable time reviewing and discussing proposals, and working out the details of the schedule. The committee for 2019 is:

  • James Morris (Microsoft)
  • Serge Hallyn (Cisco)
  • Paul Moore (Cisco)
  • Stephen Smalley (NSA)
  • Elena Reshetova (Intel)
  • John Johnansen (Canonical)
  • Kees Cook (Google)
  • Casey Schaufler (Intel)
  • Mimi Zohar (IBM)
  • David A. Wheeler (Institute for Defense Analyses)

And of course many thanks to the event folk at Linux Foundation, who handle all of the logistics of the event.

LSS-NA will be held in San Diego, CA on August 19-21. To register, click here. Or you can register for the co-located Open Source Summit and add LSS-NA.

25 Jun 2019 8:43pm GMT

19 Jun 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: Real-Time Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the Real-Time Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! The PREEMPT_RT patch set (aka "The Real-Time Patch") was created in 2004 in the effort to make Linux into a hard real-time designed operating system. Over the years much of the RT patch has made it into mainline Linux, which includes: mutexes, lockdep, high-resolution timers, Ftrace, RCU_PREEMPT, priority inheritance, threaded interrupts and much more. There's just a little left to get RT fully into mainline, and the light at the end of the tunnel is finally in view. It is expected that the RT patch will be in mainline within a year, which changes the topics of discussion. Once it is in Linus's tree, a whole new set of issues must be handled. The focus on this year's Plumbers events will include:

Come and join us in the discussion of making the LWN prediction of RT coming into mainline "this year" a reality!

We hope to see you there!

19 Jun 2019 10:55pm GMT

Linux Plumbers Conference: Testing and Fuzzing Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the Testing and Fuzzing Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Testing and fuzzing are crucial to the stability that the Linux kernel demands.

Last year's microconference brought about a number of discussions; for example, syzkaller evolved as syzbot, which keeps track of fuzzing efforts and the resulting fixes. The closing ceremony pointed out all the work that still has to be done: There are a number of overlapping efforts, and those need to be consolidated. The use of KASAN should be increased. Where is fuzzing going next? With real-time moving forward from "if" to "when" in the mainline, how does RT test coverage increase? The unit-testing frameworks may need some unification. Also, KernelCI will be announced as an LF project this time around. Stay around for the KernelCI hackathon after the conference to help further those efforts.

Come and join us for the discussion!

We hope to see you there!

19 Jun 2019 2:29am GMT

17 Jun 2019

feedKernel Planet

Linux Plumbers Conference: Toolchains Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

We are pleased to announce that the Toolchains Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! The Linux kernel may
be one of the most powerful systems around, but it takes a powerful toolchain to make that happen. The kernel takes advantage of any feature
that the toolchains provide, and collaboration between the kernel and toolchain developers will make that much more seamless.

Toolchains topics will include:

Come and join us in the discussion of what makes it possible to build the most robust and flexible kernel in the world!

We hope to see you there!

17 Jun 2019 6:10pm GMT

11 Nov 2011

feedLinux Today

Tech Comics: "How to Live with Non-Geeks"

Datamation: Geeks must realize that non-geeks simply don't understand some very basics things.

11 Nov 2011 11:00pm GMT

How To Activate Screen Saver In Ubuntu 11.10

AddictiveTip: Ubuntu 11.10 does not come with a default screen saver, and even Gnome 3 provides nothing but a black screen when your system is idle.

11 Nov 2011 10:00pm GMT

XFCE: Your Lightweight, Speedy, Fully-Fledged Linux Desktop

MakeUseOf: As far as Linux goes, customization is king

11 Nov 2011 9:00pm GMT

Fedora Scholarship Recognizes Students for Their Contributions to Open Source Software

Red Hat: The Fedora Scholarship is awarded to one student each year to assist with the recipient's college or university education.

11 Nov 2011 8:00pm GMT

Digital Divide Persists Even as Broadband Adoption Grows

Datamation: New report from Dept. of Commerce shows that the 'have nots' - continue to have not when it comes to Internet.

11 Nov 2011 7:00pm GMT

Why GNOME refugees love Xfce

The Register: Thunar rather than later...

11 Nov 2011 6:00pm GMT

Everything should be open source, says WordPress founder

Between the Lines: "It's a bold statement, but it's the ethos that Mullenweg admirably stuck to, pointing out that sites like Wikipedia replaced Encyclopedia Britannica, and how far Android has gone for mobile."

11 Nov 2011 5:02pm GMT

The Computer I Need

LXer: "Before I had a cell phone I did not realize that I needed one. As of one week ago, I did not realize that I needed a tablet either but I can sense that it might be a similar experience."

11 Nov 2011 4:01pm GMT

GPL violations in Android: Same arguments, different day

IT World: "IP attorney Edward J. Naughton is repeating his arguments that Google's use of Linux kernel header files within Android may be in violation of the GNU General Public License (GPLv2), and tries to discredit Linus Torvalds' thoughts on the matter along the way."

11 Nov 2011 3:04pm GMT

No uTorrent for Linux by Year's End

Softpedia: "When asked why there's no uTorrent client version of Linux users out, BitTorrent Inc. said that the company has other priorities at the moment."

11 Nov 2011 2:01pm GMT

Keep an Eye on Your Server with phpSysInfo

Linux Magazine: "There are quite a few server monitoring solutions out there, but most of them are overkill for keeping an eye on a single personal server."

11 Nov 2011 1:03pm GMT

At long last, Mozilla Releases Lightning 1.0 Calendar

InternetNews: From the 'Date and Time' files:

11 Nov 2011 12:00pm GMT

Richard Stallman's Personal Ad

Editors' Note: You can't make this stuff up...

11 Nov 2011 10:00am GMT

Linux Top 5: Fedora 16 Aims for the Cloud

LinuxPlanet: There are many things to explore on the Linux Planet. This week, a new Fedora release provides plenty of items to examine. The new Fedora release isn't the only new open source release this week, as the Linux Planet welcomes new KDE and Firefox releases as well.

11 Nov 2011 9:00am GMT

Orion Editor Ships in Firefox 8

Planet Orion: Firefox 8 now includes the Orion code editor in its scratchpad feature.

11 Nov 2011 6:00am GMT