15 Jun 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Christophe Rhodes: sbcl method tracing

Since approximately forever, sbcl has advertised the possibility of tracing individual methods of a generic function by passing :methods t as an argument to trace. Until recently, tracing methods was only supported using the :encapsulate nil style of tracing, modifying the compiled code for function objects directly.

For a variety of reasons, the alternative :encapsulate t implementation of tracing, effectively wrapping the function with some code to run around it, is more robust. One problem with :encapsulate nil tracing is that if the object being traced is a closure, the modification of the function's code will affect all of the closures, not just any single one - closures are distinct objects with distinct closed-over environments, but they share the same execuable code, so modifying one of them modifies all of them. However, the implementation of method tracing I wrote in 2005 - essentially, finding and tracing the method functions and the method fast-functions (on which more later) - was fundamentally incompatible with encapsulation; the method functions are essentially never called by name by CLOS, but by more esoteric means.

What are those esoteric means, I hear you ask?! I'm glad I can hear you. The Metaobject Protocol defines a method calling convention, such that method calls receive as two arguments firstly: the entire argument list as the method body would expect to handle; and secondly: the list of sorted applicable next methods, such that the first element is the method which should be invoked if the method uses call-next-method. So a method function conforming to this protocol has to:

  1. destructure its first argument to bind the method parameters to the arguments given;
  2. if call-next-method is used, reconstruct an argument list (in general, because the arguments to the next method need not be the same as the arguments to the existing method) before calling the next method's method-function with the reconstructed argument list and the rest of the next methods.

But! For a given set of actual arguments, for that call, the set of applicable methods is known; the precedence order is known; and, with a bit of bookkeeping in the implementation of defmethod, whether any individual method actually calls call-next-method is known. So it is possible, at the point of calling a generic-function with a set of arguments, to know not only the first applicable method, but in fact all the applicable methods, their ordering, and the combination of those methods that will actually get called (which is determined by whether methods invoke call-next-method and also by the generic function's method combination).

Therefore, a sophisticated (and by "sophisticated" here I mean "written by the wizards at Xerox PARC)") implementation of CLOS can compile an effective method for a given call, resolve all the next-method calls, perform some extra optimizations on slot-value and slot accessors, improve the calling convention (we no longer need the list of next methods, but only a single next effective-method, so we can spread the argument list once more), and cache the resulting function for future use. So the one-time cost for each set of applicable methods generates an optimized effective method, making use of fast-method-functions with the improved calling convention.

Here's the trick, then: this effective method is compiled into a chain of method-call and fast-method-call objects, which call their embedded functions. This, then, is ripe for encapsulation; to allow method tracing, all we need to do is arrange at compute-effective-method time that those embedded functions are wrapped in code that performs the tracing, and that any attempt to untrace the generic function (or to modify the tracing parameters) reinitializes the generic function instance, which clears all the effective method caches. And then Hey Bob, Your Uncle's Presto! and everything works.

(defgeneric foo (x)
  (:method (x) 3))
(defmethod foo :around ((x fixnum))
  (1+ (call-next-method)))
(defmethod foo ((x integer))
  (* 2 (call-next-method)))
(defmethod foo ((x float))
  (* 3 (call-next-method)))
(defmethod foo :before ((x single-float))
  'single)
(defmethod foo :after ((x double-float))
 'double)

Here's a generic function foo with moderately complex methods. How can we work out what is going on? Call the method tracer!

CL-USER> (foo 2.0d0)
  0: (FOO 2.0d0)
    1: ((SB-PCL::COMBINED-METHOD FOO) 2.0d0)
      2: ((METHOD FOO (FLOAT)) 2.0d0)
        3: ((METHOD FOO (T)) 2.0d0)
        3: (METHOD FOO (T)) returned 3
      2: (METHOD FOO (FLOAT)) returned 9
      2: ((METHOD FOO :AFTER (DOUBLE-FLOAT)) 2.0d0)
      2: (METHOD FOO :AFTER (DOUBLE-FLOAT)) returned DOUBLE
    1: (SB-PCL::COMBINED-METHOD FOO) returned 9
  0: FOO returned 9
9

This mostly works. It doesn't quite handle all cases, specifically when the CLOS user adds a method and implements call-next-method for themselves:

(add-method #'foo
            (make-instance 'standard-method
             :qualifiers '()
             :specializers (list (find-class 'fixnum))
             :lambda-list '(x)
             :function (lambda (args nms) (+ 2 (funcall (sb-mop:method-function (first nms)) args (rest nms))))))
CL-USER> (foo 3)
  0: (FOO 3)
    1: ((METHOD FOO :AROUND (FIXNUM)) 3)
      2: ((METHOD FOO (FIXNUM)) 3)
      2: (METHOD FOO (FIXNUM)) returned 8
    1: (METHOD FOO :AROUND (FIXNUM)) returned 9
  0: FOO returned 9
9

In this trace, we have lost the method trace from the direct call to the method-function, and calls that that function makes; this is the cost of performing the trace in the effective method, though a mitigating factor is that we have visibility of method combination (through the (sb-pcl::combined-method foo) line in the trace above). It would probably be possible to do the encapsulation in the method object itself, by modifying the function and the fast-function, but this requires rather more book-keeping and (at least theoretically) breaks the object identity: we do not have licence to modify the function stored in a method object. So, for now, sbcl has this imperfect solution for users to try (expected to be in sbcl-1.4.9, probably released towards the end of June).

(I can't really believe it's taken me twelve years to do this. Other implementations have had this working for years. Sorry!)

15 Jun 2018 9:00pm GMT

01 Jun 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Quicklisp news: No May 2018 Quicklisp dist update

The computer on which I make Quicklisp builds stopped working a little while ago, and I haven't had time to dive in and work on it. As soon as it's fixed, I'll prepare and release a new dist. Sorry about the inconvenience!

01 Jun 2018 12:50pm GMT

26 May 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Christophe Rhodes: sbcl method-combination fixes

At the 2018 European Lisp Symposium, the most obviously actionable feedback for SBCL from a presentation was from Didier's remorseless deconstruction of SBCL's support for method combinations (along with the lack of explicitness about behavioural details in the ANSI CL specification and the Art of the Metaobject Protocol). I don't think that Didier meant to imply that SBCL was particularly bad at method combinations, compared with other available implementations - merely that SBCL was a convenient target. And, to be fair, there was a bug report from a discussion with Bruno Haible back in SBCL's history - May/June 2004, according to my search - which had languished largely unfixed for fourteen years.

I said that I found the Symposium energising. And what better use to put that energy than addressing user feedback? So, I spent a bit of time earlier this month thinking, fixing and attempting to work out what behaviours might actually be useful. To be clear, SBCL's support for define-method-combination was (probably) standards-compliant in the usual case, but if you follow the links from above, or listen to Didier's talk, you will be aware that that's not saying all that much, in that almost nothing is specified about behaviours under redefinition of method combinations.

So, to start with, I solved the cache invalidation (one of the hardest problems in Computer Science), making sure that discriminating functions and effective methods are reset and invalidated for all affected generic functions. This was slightly complicated by the strategy that SBCL has of distinguishing short and long method-combinations with distinct classes (and distinct implementation strategies for compute-effective-method); but this just needed to be methodical and careful. Famous last words: I think that all method-combination behaviour in SBCL is now coherent and should meet user expectations.

More interesting, I think, was coming up with test cases for desired behaviours. Method combinations are not, I think, widely used in practice; whether that is because of lack of support, lack of understanding or lack of need of what they provide, I don't know. (In fact in conversations at ELS we discussed another possibility, which is that everyone is more comfortable customising compute-effective-method instead - both that and define-method-combination provide ways for inserting arbitrary code for the effect of a generic function call with particular arguments. But what this means is that there isn't, as far as I know at least, a large corpus of interesting method combinations to play with.

One interesting one which came up: Bike on #lisp designed an implementation using method-combinations of finite state machines, which I adapted to add to SBCL's test suite. My version looks like:

(define-method-combination fsm (default-start)
    ((primary *))
    (:arguments &key start)
  `(let ((state (or ,start ',default-start)))
     (restart-bind
         (,@(mapcar (lambda (m) `(,(first (method-qualifiers m))
                                  (lambda ()
                                    (setq state (call-method ,m))
                                    (if (and (typep state '(and symbol (not null)))
                                             (find-restart state))
                                        (invoke-restart state)
                                        state))))
                    primary))
       (invoke-restart state))))

and there will be more on this use of restart-bind in a later post, I hope. Staying on the topic of method combinations, how might one use this fsm method combination? A simple example might be to recognize strings with an even number of #\a characters:

;;; first, define something to help with all string parsing
(defclass info ()
  ((string :initarg :string)
   (index :initform 0)))
;;; then the state machine itself
(defgeneric even-as (info &key &allow-other-keys)
  (:method-combination fsm :yes))
(defmethod even-as :yes (info &key)
  (with-slots ((s string) (i index)) info
    (cond ((= i (length s)) t) ((char= (char s i) #\a) (incf i) :no) (t (incf i) :yes))))
(defmethod even-as :no (info &key)
  (with-slots ((s string) (i index)) info
    (cond ((= i (length s)) nil) ((char= (char s i) #\a) (incf i) :yes) (t (incf i) :no))))

(Exercise for the reader: adapt this to implement a Turing Machine)

Another example of (I think) an interesting method combination was one which I came up with in the context of generalized specializers, for an ELS a while ago: the HTTP Request method-combination to be used with HTTP Accept specializers. I'm interested in more! A github search found some examples before I ran out of patience; do you have any examples?

And I have one further question. The method combination takes arguments at generic-function definition time (the :yes in (:method-combination fsm :yes)). Normally, arguments to things are evaluated at the appropriate time. At the moment, SBCL (and indeed all other implementations I tested, but that's not strong evidence given the shared heritage) do not evaluate the arguments to :method-combination - treating it more like a macro call than a function call. I'm not sure that is the most helpful behaviour, but I'm struggling to come up with an example where the other is definitely better. Maybe something like

(let ((lock (make-lock)))
  (defgeneric foo (x)
    (:method-combination locked lock)
    (:method (x) ...)))

Which would allow automatic locking around the effective method of FOO through the method combination? I need to think some more here.

In any case: the method-combination fixes are in the current SBCL master branch, shortly to be released as sbcl-1.4.8. And there is still time (though not very much!) to apply for the many jobs advertised at Goldsmiths Computing - what better things to do on a Bank Holiday weekend?

26 May 2018 8:02am GMT

17 May 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Marco Antoniotti: Some updates: bugs fixing and CLAD.

Hello there,

it has been a very long time since I posted here, but most recently, thanks to a couple of pesky bug reports on HEΛP by Mirko Vukovic, and because I had a couple of days relatively free, I was able to go back to do some programming, fix (some of) the bugs and post here.

Here is the story. There were two bugs which I had to deal with (there are more, of course).
  1. A bug triggered by CCL and its implementation of the Common Lisp Reader algorithm.
  2. A buglet due to missing supporting data (.css files in this case) in the deployment of the HEΛP generated documentation.
The first bug was quite difficult to track down and it boiled down to CCL bailing out on READ in an unexpected way (that is, with respect to other implementations). As an aside, this is a problem of the standard non having a predefined condition for "error caused by the reader because it does not find a package"; LW has CONDITIONS:PACKAGE-NOT-FOUND-READER, but that is not standard, and some implementation just signal READER-ERROR or PACKAGE-ERROR. The error was easy to "fix" once diagnosed: just don't process files that you know will be problematic, and HEΛP can already "exclude" such files.

The second bug was easier to diagnose, but the fix was more complicated (especially due to the NIH syndrome I suffer from). The problem is that ASDF moves the compiled code around, but not auxiliary data, like in my case, .css files. I could have followed what ASDF does, but I decided to go another way and came up with a small library I called Common Lisp Application Data (CLAD, because you need to "dress" your code).

CLAD

By now, at least on Windows 10 and Mac OS X (and Linux), there is a a notion of an Application and Data Folder. The user version of this folder (as opposed to the system one) is ~/Library/ on Mac OS X and %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\ (this is the "roaming" profile in W10 parlance). For Linux there are several semi-standards, one of them is the XDG base directory specification; in this case a common solution is to use the ~/.config/ folder.

CLAD assumes these "fixed" locations to create per-application or per-library subfolders of a "Common Lisp" one. That is, CLAD ensures the presence of the following folders in your account.
  • Mac Os X: ~/Library/Common Lisp/
  • Windows 10: %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Common Lisp\
  • Linux/Unix: ~/.config/common-lisp/ (in this case, I am following ASDF lead)
The library exports three simple functions,
  1. user-cl-data-folder, which returns the pathnames of the folders above.
  2. ensure-app-or-library-data-folder, which, as the name implies, ensures that a subfolder exists in the proper location.
  3. app-or-library-data-folder, which returns the pathname associated to a library or app.
A library or app can now set itself up by doing something like

(defparameter *helambdap-data-folder*
(clad:ensure-app-or-library-data-folder "HELambdaP")
"The user HELambdaP data folder.")

On Mac OS X, this results in the folder ~/Library/Common Lisp/HELambdaP; a library or an application can now rely on a clear space where to store "common" data files. For HEΛP it solved the problem of where to find the .css files in a reliable place.

Trivial? Yes.
NIH syndrome? Of course.
Complete? No.
Useful? You be the judge of that.


(cheers)

17 May 2018 9:44pm GMT

15 May 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Lispjobs: Lisp Developer, 3E, Brussels, Belgium

See: http://3eeu.talentfinder.be/en/vacature/30101/lisp-developer

You join a team of developers, scientists, engineers and business developers that develop, operate and commercialize SynaptiQ worldwide.

You work in a Linux-based Java, Clojure and Common Lisp environment. Your focus is on the development, maintenance, design and unit testing of SynaptiQ's real-time aggregation and alerting engine that processes time-series and events. This data engine is Common Lisp based.

The objective is to own the entire lifecycle of the platform, that is from the architecture and development of new features to the deployment and operation of the platform in production environment. The position is open to candidates with no knowledge of LISP if they have a good affinity and experience in functional languages.

15 May 2018 1:45pm GMT

08 May 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Christophe Rhodes: algorithms and data structures term2

I presented some of the work on teaching algorithms and data structures at the 2018 European Lisp Symposium

Given that I wanted to go to the symposium (and I'm glad I did!), the most economical method for going was if I presented research work - because then there was a reasonable chance that my employer would fund the expenses (spoiler: they did; thank you!). It might perhaps be surprising to hear that they don't usually directly fund attending events where one is not presenting; on the other hand, it's perhaps reasonable on the basis that part of an academic's job as a scholar and researcher is to be creating and disseminating new knowledge, and of course universities, like any organizations, need to prioritise spending money on things which bring value or further the organization's mission.

In any case, I found that I wanted to write about the teaching work that I have been doing, and in particular I chose to write about a small, Lisp-related aspect. Specifically, it is now fairly normal in technical subjects to perform a lot of automated testing of students; it relieves the burden on staff to assess things which can be mechanically assessed, and deliver feedback to individual students which can be delivered automatically; this frees up staff time to perform targeted interventions, give better feedback on more qualitative aspects of the curriculum, or work fewer weekends of the year. A large part of my teaching work for the last 18 months has been developing material for these automated tests, and working on the infrastructure underlying them, for my and colleagues' teaching.

So, the more that we can test automatically and meaningfully, the more time we have to spend on other things. The main novelty here, and the lisp-related hook for the paper I submitted to ELS, was being able to give meaningful feedback on numerical answer questions which probed whether students were developing a good mental model of the meaning of pseudocode. That's a bit vague; let's be specific and consider the break and continue keywords:

x ← 0
for 0 ≤ i < 9
  x ← x + i
  if x > 17
    continue
  end if
  x ← x + 1
end for
return x

The above pseudocode is typical of what a student might see; the question would be "what does the above block of pseudocode return?", which is mildly arithmetically challenging, particularly under time pressure, but the conceptual aspect that was being tested here was whether the student understood the effect of continue. Therefore, it is important to give the student specific feedback; the more specific, the better. So if a student answered 20 to this question (as if the continue acted as a break), they would receive a specific feedback message reminding them about the difference between the two operators; if they answered 45, they received a message reminding them that continue has a particular meaning in loops; and any other answers received generic feedback.

Having just one of these questions does no good, though. Students will go to almost any lengths to avoid learning things, and it is easy to communicate answers to multiple-choice and short-answer questions among a cohort. So, I needed hundreds of these questions: at least one per student, but in fact by design the students could take these multiple-chocie quizzes multiple times, as they are primarily an aid for the students themselves, to help them discover what they know.

Now of course I could treat the above pseudocode fragment as a template, parameterise it (initial value, loop bounds, increment) and compute the values needing the specific feedback in terms of the values of the parameters. But this generalizes badly: what happens when I decide that I want to vary the operators (say to introduce multiplication) or modify the structure somewhat (e.g. by swapping the two increments before and after the continue)? The parametrization gets more and more complicated, the chances of (my) error increase, and perhaps most importantly it's not any fun.

Instead, what did I do? With some sense of grim inevitability, I evolved (or maybe accreted) an interpreter (in emacs lisp) for a sexp-based representation of this pseudocode. At the start of the year, it's pretty simple; towards the end it has developed into an almost reasonable mini-language. Writing the interpreter is straightforward, though the way it evolved into one gigantic case statement for supported operators rather than having reasonable semantics is a bit of a shame; as a bonus, implementing a pretty-printer for the sexp-based pseudocode, with correct indentation and keyword highlighting, is straightforward. Then armed with the pseudocode I will ask the students to interpret, I can mutate it in ways that I anticipate students might think like (replacing continue with break or progn) and interpret that form to see which wrong answer should generate what feedback.

Anyway, that was the hook. There's some evidence in the paper that the general approach of repeated micro-assessment, and also the the consideration of likely student mistakes and giving specific feedback, actually works. And now that the (provisional) results are in, how does this term compare with last term? We can look at the relationship between this term's marks and last term's. What should we be looking for? Generally, I would expect marks in the second term's coursework to be broadly similar to the marks in the first term - all else being equal, students who put in a lot of effort and are confident with the material in term 1 are likely to have an easier time integrating the slightly more advanced material in term 2. That's not a deterministic rule, though; some students will have been given a wake-up call by the term 1 marks, and equally some students might decide to coast.

plot of term 2 marks against term 1: a = 0.82, R² = 0.67

I've asked R to draw the regression line in the above picture; a straight line fit seems reasonable based on the plot. What are the statistics of that line?

R> summary(lm(Term2~Term1, data=d))

Call:
lm(formula = Term2 ~ Term1, data = d)

Residuals:
        Min      1Q  Median      3Q     Max 
    -41.752  -6.032   1.138   6.107  31.155 

Coefficients:
Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)
(Intercept)  3.18414    4.09773   0.777    0.439
Term1        0.82056    0.05485  14.961   <2e-16 ***
---
Signif. codes:  0 '***' 0.001 '**' 0.01 '*' 0.05 '.' 0.1 ' ' 1

Residual standard error: 10.46 on 107 degrees of freedom
  (32 observations deleted due to missingness)
Multiple R-squared:  0.6766,    Adjusted R-squared:  0.6736 
F-statistic: 223.8 on 1 and 107 DF,  p-value: < 2.2e-16

Looking at the summary above, we have a strong positive relationship between term 1 and term 2 marks. The intercept is approximately zero (if you got no marks in term 1, you should expect no marks in term 2), and the slope is less than one: on average, each mark a student got in term 1 tended to convert to 0.8 marks in term 2 - this is plausibly explained by the material being slightly harder in term 2, and by the fact that some of the assessments were more explicitly designed to allow finer discrimination at the top end - marks in the 90s. (A note for international readers: in the UK system, the pass mark is 40%, excellent work is typically awarded a mark in the 70% range - marks of 90% should be reserved for exceptional work). The average case is, however, only that: there was significant variation from that average line, and indeed (looking at the quartiles) over 50% of the cohort was more than half a degree class (5 percentage points) away from their term 2 mark as "predicted" from their mark for term 1.

All of this seems reasonable, and it was a privilege to work with this cohort of students, and to present the sum of their interactions on this course to the audience I had. I got the largest round of applause, I think, for revealing that as part of the peer-assessment I had required that students run each others' code. I also had to present some of the context for the work; not only because this was an international gathering, with people in various university systems and from industry, but also because of the large-scale disruption caused by industrial action over the Universities Superannuation Scheme (the collective, defined benefit pension fund for academics at about 68 Universities and ~300 other bodies associated with Higher Education). Perhaps most gratifyingly, students were able to continue learning despite being deprived of their tuition for three consecutive weeks; judging by their performance on the various assessments so far,

And now? The students will sit an exam, after which I and colleagues will look in detail at those results and the relationship with the students' coursework marks (as I did last year). I will continue developing this material (my board for this module currently lists 33 todo items), and adapt it for next year and for new cohorts. And maybe you will join me? The Computing department at Goldsmiths is hiring lecturers and senior lecturers to come and participate in research, scholarship and teaching in computing: a lecturer in creative computing, a lecturer in computer games, a lecturer in data science, a lecturer in physical and creative computing, a lecturer in computer science and a senior lecturer in computer science. Anyone reading this is welcome to contact me to find out more!

08 May 2018 7:17pm GMT

07 May 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Victor Anyakin: “A new way of blogging about Common Lisp” by Yehonathan Sharvit

Seen this post mentioned several times on Twitter, but not on Planet Lisp yet. So, here it is:

A new way of blogging about Common Lisp by Yehonathan Sharvit (@viebel).

07 May 2018 10:57am GMT

04 May 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Christophe Rhodes: els2018 reflections

A few weeks ago, I attended the 2018 European Lisp Symposium.

If you were at the 2017 iteration, you might (as I do) have been left with an abiding image of greyness. That was not at all to fault the location (Brussels) or the organization (co-located with ) of the symposium; however, the weather was unkind, and that didn't help with my own personal low-energy mood at the time.

This year, the event was organized by Ravenpack in Marbella. And the first thing that I noticed on landing was the warmth. (Perhaps the only "perk" of low-cost airlines is that it is most likely that one will disembark on to terra firma rather than a passenger boarding bridge. And after quite a miserable winter in the UK, the warmth and the sunshine at the bus stop, while waiting for the bus from Malagá airport to Marbella, was very welcome indeed. The sense of community was strong too; while waiting for the bus, I hopped on to #lisp IRC and Nic Hafner volunteered to meet me at the Marbella bus station and walk with me to my hotel; we ended up going for drinks at a beachside bar that evening with Dimitri Fontaine, Christian Schafmeister, Mikhail Raskin and others - and while we were sitting there, enjoying the setting, I saw other faces I recognised walking past along the beach promenade.

The setting for the conference itself, the Centro Cultural Cortijo de Miraflores, was charming. We had the use of a room, just about big enough for the 90ish delegates; the centre is the seat of the Marbella Historical Archives, and our room was next to the olive oil exhibition.

2018 European Lisp Symposium opening

We also had an inside courtyard for the breaks; sun, shade, water and coffee were available in equal measure, and there was space for good conversations - I spoke with many people, and it was great to catch up and reminisce with old friends, and to discuss the finer points of language implementation and release management with new ones. (I continue to maintain that the SBCL time-boxed monthly release cadence of master, initiated by Bill Newman way back in the SBCL 0.7 days in 2002 [!], has two distinct advantages, for our situation, compared with other possible choices, and I said so more than once over coffee.)

The formal programme, curated by Dave Cooper, was great too. Zach's written about his highlights; I enjoyed hearing Jim Newton's latest on being smarter about typecase, and Robert Smith's presentation about quantum computing, including a walkthrough of a quantum computing simulator. As well as quantum computing, application areas mentioned in talks this year included computational chemistry, data parallel processing, pedagogy, fluid dynamics, architecture, sentiment analysis and enterprise resource planning - and there were some implementation talks in there too, not least from R. "it's part of the brand" Matthew Emerson, who gave a paean to Clozure Common Lisp. Highly non-scientific SBCL user feedback from ELS presenters: most of the speakers with CL-related talks or applications at least mentioned SBCL; most of those mentions by speaker were complimentary, but it's possible that most by raw count referred to bugs - solely due to Didier Verna's presentation about method combinations (more on this in a future blog post).

Overall, I found this year's event energising. I couldn't be there any earlier than the Sunday evening, nor could I stay beyond Wednesday morning, so I missed at least the organized social event, but the two days I had were full and stress-free (even when chairing sessions and for my own talk). The local organization was excellent; Andrew Lawson, Nick Levine and our hosts at the foundation did us proud; we had a great conference dinner, and the general location was marvellous.

Next year's event will once again be co-located with <Programming>, this time in Genova (sunny!) on 1st-2nd April 2019. Put it in your calendar now!

04 May 2018 9:29am GMT

02 May 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Didier Verna: Lisp, Jazz, Aikido, 10 years later

10 years ago, I published a short blog entitled "Lisp, Jazz, Aikido", barely scratching the surface of what I found to be commonalities between the 3 disciplines. At the time, I had the intuition that those ideas were the tip of a potentially big iceberg, and I ended the blog with the following sentence: "I'd like to write a proper essay about these things when I find the time... someday."

Well, 10 years later, I did. The essay, which is 50 pages long, has been published in the Art, Science, and Engineering of Programming Journal, and actually received the Reviewers'Choice Award 2018. I'm not the bragging type, far from it, but I had to mention this because this essay is so personal, and I invested so much in its preparation (more than 300 hours) that I am as deeply touched by the award as I would have been hurt, had it been negatively received...

The live presentation has unfortunately not been recorded, but I took the time to make a screencast afterwards, which is now available on YouTube. Just like the essay, this presentation is not in the typical setting that you'd expect at a scientific conference...

If you've got an artistic fiber, if you're sensitive to the aesthetic dimension in what you do, you may enjoy this work...

02 May 2018 12:00am GMT

01 May 2018

feedPlanet Lisp

Zach Beane: Thoughts on ELS 2018

Matt Emerson opened the conference keynote talk on Clozure CL. He also touched on using and celebrating CL. It provided a jolt of enthusiasm and positivity to kick off a fun conference. And it made me want to use Clozure CL more often and learn how to effectively hack on and with it.

Nicolas Hafner's talk on shaders was interesting, but partway through the talk he revealed that the slideshow system itself was an interactive Common Lisp program. Along with standard slideshow behavior, it displayed and animated the classic teapot, with interactive recompilation and redisplay of the shaders.

Ethan Schwartz's talk on Google's tweaks to SBCL's GC was a reminder that you don't have to settle for the system-provided customization knobs. When source is available and you're willing to customize very specifically for your application's workload, you can get nice improvements.

(Also his passing mention of Docker inspired me to work on a Docker image with all the Quicklisp-required foreign libraries baked into it. I think it will be helpful to me for easier testing, and maybe distributed builds. It should be helpful to others for testing everything in Quicklisp without the pain of gathering all the build requirements for its many projects.)

You should check out Douglas Katzman's lightning talk, "Self-modifying code (for fun and profit)". He's added a neat thing in SBCL where the system can be disassembled completely and reassembled into a new binary with various bits of optimization or instrumentation.

There were many other great talks and discussions!

It's rejuvenating to hear about all the cool things people are working on. There's stuff people are making that you might make use of in your own projects, or inspiration to hack your own things to share with others.

Also: great weather, great city, fun excursion to Ronda, seeing old friends from past conferences, meeting new friends, putting online names to real-life faces, hearing directly from people who use Quicklisp. And Dmitri Fontaine told me about tic80, which my kid and I used to make a retro game in just a few days.

Next ELS conference is in Genova, Italy on April 1, 2019. Start planning today, and I'll see you there!

01 May 2018 1:55am GMT