04 Aug 2015

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Weight-Loss Surgery Changes Gut Bacteria

Bariatric surgery may lead to long-term changes in people's gut bacteria that contribute to weight loss following the procedure, a new study from Sweden suggests. Researchers analyzed the gut bacteria of 14 women nearly a decade after they underwent bariatric surgery, also known as weight-loss surgery. Half of the women had undergone a type of surgery called Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, in which doctors create a small pouch out of the top of the stomach and connect it directly to the small intestine.

04 Aug 2015 11:38pm GMT

Fatherhood in Early 20s May Raise Risk of Midlife Death

The findings suggest that young fathers have poorer health than men who become fathers at age 25 or older, but it's not clear why, the researchers said. Future research may tease apart the link between young fatherhood and how a man's family environment, early life circumstances and genetics may affect his risk of midlife death, the researchers wrote in the study, published online today (Aug. 3) in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. It's possible that early fatherhood may interrupt career plans and push young dads into lower-paying jobs, which could impair their health, the researchers said.

04 Aug 2015 11:37pm GMT

Hot Finding: Spicy Food Linked with Longer Life

Firing up the flavors in your food may help you live longer: Eating spicy foods frequently may be tied to a slightly lower risk of an earlier death, according to a new study. In the study, researchers asked nearly 500,000 people in China how often they ate hot, spicy foods. The researchers found that the people in the study who ate spicy foods one or two days a week were 10 percent less likely to die during the study, compared with those who ate spicy foods less than once a week, according to the study published today (Aug. 4) in the journal The BMJ.

04 Aug 2015 11:36pm GMT

Kickstarter Launches to Build a Mini-James Webb Space Telescope

Kickstarter Launches to Build a Mini-James Webb Space TelescopeAs NASA gears up for the launch of its next great space telescope in 2018, a model-making team is asking for help to create miniature versions of the huge observatory for public outreach. The group, MesaTech, which describes itself as a "broadly purposed cooperative founded and managed by our members," launched a Kickstarter campaign asking for $25,000 to produce models of NASA's infrared James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The group said it has spent four years touring NASA centers with a one-sixth-scale deployable model of the telescope, but the model's large size limits its use.


04 Aug 2015 7:52pm GMT

Apollo Moon Rocket Engines Recovered by Amazon CEO Preserved for Display

Apollo Moon Rocket Engines Recovered by Amazon CEO Preserved for DisplayTwo and a half years after an expedition led by the CEO of Amazon.com raised them off the ocean floor, the historic rocket engine parts that launched NASA astronauts on at least three missions to the moon are now preserved for museum display. The conservation team at the Cosmosphere International SciEd Center and Space Museum (formerly known as the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center) in Hutchinson, Kansas completed researching and stabilizing the 25,000 pounds (11,340 kg) of Saturn V F-1 engine parts in June. The mangled and twisted Apollo artifacts were recovered by a privately-financed effort organized by Amazon.com's Jeff Bezos more than four decades after the engines were used in the launches of the first, second and fifth manned moon landings.


04 Aug 2015 5:42pm GMT

Eco-friendly 3D printed supercar

By Ben Gruber A California automotive start-up is hoping their prototype supercar will redefine car manufacturing. The sleek race car dubbed 'Blade' didn't come off an assembly line - but out of a 3D printer. Kevin Czinger of Divergent Microfactories has spent most of his career in the automotive industry.

04 Aug 2015 4:53pm GMT

03 Aug 2015

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U.S. drones capture breath samples from humpback whales in study

Researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Cape Cod have begun using a helicopter-style drone to monitor humpback whales off the coast, collecting breath samples from their blowholes and taking aerial pictures. The scientists first deployed the 32-inch "hexacopter" drone in July to help assess the health of whales living in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, about 45 miles (72 km) east of Boston, where there is significant ship traffic and pollution, Woods Hole said in a release on Monday. It swooped down to 10 feet above seal level to collect 20 breath samples from 16 whales," according to the release.

03 Aug 2015 8:29pm GMT

Tree of 40 Fruit: Dazzling Franken-Tree Has Roots in Science

Tree of 40 Fruit: Dazzling Franken-Tree Has Roots in ScienceThe so-called "Tree of 40 Fruit" - blossoming in a variety of pretty pink hues when completed - is rooted in science. The eye-catching artistic rendering of the tree brought worldwide attention to its creator, Sam Van Aken, a professor in the school of art at Syracuse University in New York. "[Van Aken has] taken the idea of a single root stock and a single variety and amplified it to express something creative, and that's the artistic side of it for him," said Greg Peck, an assistant professor of horticulture at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.


03 Aug 2015 2:00pm GMT

Star Trek-style home elevator could replace stairlifts

By Matthew Stock For people living in a house with more than one storey, stairlifts or home elevators are often a necessity of life as they get older and find it harder to get up and down the stairs. Normal stairlifts have the disadvantage of being a permanent and visible addition to a staircase, while traditional home elevators are bulky and often impractical for most homes. A company in England is hoping their novel design will fill the gap in the market for a new kind of home elevator.

03 Aug 2015 12:41pm GMT

01 Aug 2015

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U.S. Air Force closely following SpaceX blast probe: general

The U.S. Air Force is involved in and closely following a SpaceX-led investigation into the explosion that destroyed an unmanned Falcon 9 rocket minutes after liftoff from Florida on June 28, a top general said on Friday. Lieutentant General Samuel Greaves, who heads the Air Force Space and Missiles Systems Center, did not address those concerns directly.

01 Aug 2015 12:00am GMT

31 Jul 2015

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Scientist: Oil slick likely from natural seafloor seepage

In this photo provided by the Santa Barbara County, Calif., Fire Department, Henry Duncan, left, and Bob Seiler, legs covered in oil, foreground, stand in the Goleta Beach parking lot with their oil-covered kayaks, on the truck at rear, in Goleta, Calif., Wednesday, July 29, 2015. The pair encountered a large oil sheen and called the fire department to investigate. The Coast Guard is investigating this new oil slick off the Southern California coast about a dozen miles from where a broken pipeline spilled thousands of gallons of crude into the ocean in May. (Mike Eliason/ Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)LOS ANGELES (AP) - Coast Guard officials say it will likely be a couple more days before they can definitively say what caused a miles-long oil slick to materialize off the Santa Barbara County coast this week, but an expert said Thursday it was more than likely the result of ocean-floor seepage.


31 Jul 2015 2:09am GMT

30 Jul 2015

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Philae lander shows there's more to comets than soft dust

Accomazzo SOM of ESOC reacts after successful landing of Philae lander on comet 67P/ Churyumov-GerasimenkoBy Victoria Bryan and Maria Sheahan BERLIN/FRANKFURT (Reuters) - The comet lander Philae may be uncommunicative at the moment, but the pictures and measurements it took after it touched down on a comet in November have shown scientists that the comet is covered with coarse material, rather than dust, and is harder than expected. European scientists celebrated an historic first when Philae landed on a comet called 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November after a 10-year journey through space aboard the Rosetta spacecraft. As it landed, Philae bounced and ended up in shadow, where its batteries soon ran out.


30 Jul 2015 6:05pm GMT

'Bathtub Rings' On Saturn Moon Titan Suggest Dynamic Seas

'Bathtub Rings' On Saturn Moon Titan Suggest Dynamic SeasSaturn's moon, Titan, is the only object in the solar system other than Earth known to have liquid on its surface. While most of the lakes are found around the poles, the dry regions near the equator contain signs of evaporated material left behind like rings on a bathtub that, when combined with geological features, suggest that the location of the liquids on the moon has shifted over time. "Today, Titan's equatorial region is more like a desert - there is a huge sand sea of these phenomenal linear dunes and no lakes or seas," Shannon MacKenzie, a graduate student in physics at the University of Idaho, told Astrobiology Magazine by email.


30 Jul 2015 11:26am GMT

29 Jul 2015

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Lost In Space Without a Spacesuit? Here's What Would Happen (Podcast)

Lost In Space Without a Spacesuit? Here's What Would Happen (Podcast)Paul Sutter is a research fellow at the Astronomical Observatory of Trieste and visiting scholar at the Ohio State University's Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics. Sutter is also host of the podcasts Ask a Spaceman and RealSpace, and the YouTube series Space In Your Face.


29 Jul 2015 6:40pm GMT

Is Life Possible Around Binary Stars? (Podcast)

Is Life Possible Around Binary Stars? (Podcast)Paul Sutter is a research fellow at the Astronomical Observatory of Trieste and visiting scholar at the Ohio State University's Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics. Sutter is also host of the podcasts Ask a Spaceman and Realspace, and the YouTube series Space In Your Face. He contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights.


29 Jul 2015 6:34pm GMT

Corrected - No new contact with comet lander, scientists say

(Corrects surname of DLR scientist in final two paragraphs to Geurts ..not.. Guerts) BERLIN (Reuters) - European scientists said on Wednesday they had once again failed to make contact with the Philae comet lander, which has struggled to maintain a reliable communication link since coming back to life last month. The fridge-sized robotic lab, which landed on a comet called 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November in an historic first, last made contact via the Rosetta orbiter on July 9. The lander initially bounced away from its intended landing place upon reaching the comet and settled in the shadows where there was not enough sunlight to power its solar panels.

29 Jul 2015 12:28pm GMT