20 Jan 2017

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Scientists enter Hawaii dome in eight-month Mars space mission study

Six scientists have entered a dome perched atop a remote volcano in Hawaii where they will spend the next eight months in isolation to simulate life for astronauts traveling to Mars, the University of Hawaii said. The study is designed to help NASA better understand human behavior and performance during long space missions as the U.S. space agency explores plans for a manned mission to the Red Planet. "I'm proud of the part we play in helping reduce the barriers to a human journey to Mars," said Kim Binsted, the mission's principal investigator.

20 Jan 2017 8:52am GMT

Scientists enter Hawaii dome in eight-month Mars space mission study

(Reuters) - Six scientists have entered a dome perched atop a remote volcano in Hawaii where they will spend the next eight months in isolation to simulate life for astronauts traveling to Mars, the University of Hawaii said. The study is designed to help NASA better understand human behavior and performance during long space missions as the U.S. space agency explores plans for a manned mission to the Red Planet. "I'm proud of the part we play in helping reduce the barriers to a human journey to Mars," said Kim Binsted, the mission's principal investigator.

20 Jan 2017 8:47am GMT

Scientists will live in a dome for 8 months to simulate Mars

In this May 23, 2014 photo provided by the University of Hawaii, Lucie Poulet, right, uses a geotechnical tool while Annie Caraccio records the data during a previous study outside the domed structure that will house six researchers for eight months in an environment meant to simulate an expedition to Mars, on Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawaii. The group will enter the dome Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, and spend eight months together in the 1,200-square-foot research facility in a study called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS). They will have no physical contact with any humans outside their group, experience a 20-minute delay in communications and are required to wear space suits whenever they leave the compound. (Ross Lockwood/University of Hawaii via AP)HONOLULU (AP) - Six carefully selected scientists have entered a man-made dome on a remote Hawaii volcano as part of a human-behavior study that could help NASA as it draws up plans for sending astronauts on long missions to Mars.


20 Jan 2017 3:11am GMT

19 Jan 2017

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Small moth with yellowish coif named after Donald Trump

Small moth with a yellowish-white coif of scales, dubbed Neopalpa donaldtrumpi and named after U.S. President-edit Donald Trump(Reuters) - A small moth with a yellowish-white coif of scales has been named after U.S. President-edit Donald Trump, in honor of the former reality TV show host and real estate magnate's signature hairdo. The new species, dubbed Neopalpa donaldtrumpi, lives in a habitat that spans southern California and Mexico's Baja California and was named by evolutionary biologist Vazrick Nazari in an article published in the scientific journal ZooKeys. The moth, the second species of a genus of twirler moths, can be distinguished by the yellowish-white scales on the head of its adults, according to the journal.


19 Jan 2017 10:35pm GMT

California scientist names moth species after Donald Trump

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - A scientist in California has named a newly discovered moth species after President-elect Donald Trump, saying the white and yellow scales on the insect's head are reminiscent of Trump's blond hairdo.

19 Jan 2017 6:27pm GMT

Skin Medication Can Be Lethal for Pets, FDA Warns

Skin Medication Can Be Lethal for Pets, FDA WarnsA cream used to treat skin cancer and abnormal skin lesions can be lethal for pets, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned today. The agency said the medication, called fluorouracil, can make pets sick, and even kill them in some cases. "People using this medication should use care when applying and storing the medication if they are also in a household with pets, as even very small amounts could be dangerous to these animals," the FDA said in a statement.


19 Jan 2017 2:44pm GMT

President Bush in the ICU: Why Does Pneumonia Strike Older Adults?

President Bush in the ICU: Why Does Pneumonia Strike Older Adults?Former President George H.W. Bush was hospitalized on Jan. 14 following a bout of pneumonia, CNN reported today (Jan. 18). In addition, Bush's wife, former first lady Barbara Bush, was admitted to the hospital today as a precaution because she was experiencing "fatigue and coughing," according to CNN. The 41st president turned 92 last summer, and Barbara Bush is 91.


19 Jan 2017 2:44pm GMT

Mold Inside Sophie the Giraffe Toys: Should Parents Worry?

Mold Inside Sophie the Giraffe Toys: Should Parents Worry?Some parents recently got a shocking sight when they cut open their child's favorite teething toy, Sophie the Giraffe: The toy's innards were teeming with mold. This week, Good Housekeeping reported several instances of parents cutting open Sophie the Giraffe and finding mold inside the toy. Now, a number of parents have taken to social media to share their pictures of Sophie's insides filled with black mold.


19 Jan 2017 2:44pm GMT

Argentine scientists in Antarctica tally toll of climate change

Cracks are seen on the Fourcade glacier near Argentina's Carlini Base in AntarcticaThe glacier has retreated 500 meters (1,640 feet) over 25 years, scientists working on this island just north of the Antarctica Peninsula say, affecting an entire ecosystem of algae, sea lions and penguins, as well as raising sea levels. "This glacial retreat at Potter Cove releases a mass of fresh water that alters salinity levels and unleashes sediment ... changing the abundance and diversity of wildlife," said Rodolfo Sanchez, director of Argentina's Antarctic Institute.


19 Jan 2017 2:01pm GMT

Argentine scientists in Antarctica tally toll of climate change

The glacier has retreated 500 meters (1,640 feet) over 25 years, scientists working on this island just north of the Antarctica Peninsula say, affecting an entire ecosystem of algae, sea lions and penguins, as well as raising sea levels. "This glacial retreat at Potter Cove releases a mass of fresh water that alters salinity levels and unleashes sediment ... changing the abundance and diversity of wildlife," said Rodolfo Sanchez, director of Argentina's Antarctic Institute.

19 Jan 2017 1:06pm GMT

18 Jan 2017

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Hemp hits new high as building material on Dutch bridge

By Jim Drury EINDHOVEN, Netherlands (Reuters) - While plenty of cannabis goes up in smoke in coffee shops around the Netherlands, Dutch researchers have found a new use for it - as an environmentally friendly building material to rival cement or steel. "Actually it's the first 'bio-based' bridge in the world, as far as we know," said Rijk Blok, an assistant professor of structural design at the Eindhoven University of Technology. The hemp and flax fibers are combined in a resin that is stuck to a core made of polylactic acid, a polymer also made of plant material, to form the span of the 14-metre (46-foot) bridge over a stream on the university campus.

18 Jan 2017 5:05pm GMT

World temperatures hit new high in 2016 for third year in a row

FILE PHOTO: People cool off in fountains as hot summer temperatures hit ParisBy Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - World temperatures hit a record high for the third year in a row in 2016, creeping closer to a ceiling set for global warming with extremes including unprecedented heat in India and ice melt in the Arctic, U.S. government agencies said on Wednesday. The data, supported by findings from other organizations, was issued two days before the inauguration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, who questions whether climate change has a human cause. Average surface temperatures over land and the oceans in 2016 were 0.94 degrees Celsius (1.69 degrees Fahrenheit) above the 20th-century average of 13.9C (57.0F), according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).


18 Jan 2017 3:34pm GMT

Study finds global warming could steal postcard-perfect days

FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2013 file photo, a child plays with a ball next to a couple posing for a photographer in a park outside Bucharest, Romania. Newlywed couples took advantage of the unusual warm weather for the month of November, with temperatures reaching 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), for outdoor photo sessions. Kiss goodbye some of those postcard-perfect, ideal-for-outdoor-wedding days. A new study said global warming is going to steal some of those exceedingly pleasant weather days from our future. On average, Earth will have four fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by 2035 and ten fewer of them by the end of the century, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)WASHINGTON (AP) - Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather.


18 Jan 2017 2:46pm GMT

Europe's oncologists back biosimilar versions of cancer drugs

(Reuters) - Europe's leading association of oncologists has thrown its weight behind cheaper copycat versions of biotech cancer drugs that have lost patent protection, saying they are effective and affordable. Off-patent chemical medicines have for decades been copied with precision and sold as cheap generic versions, but drug regulators have only over recent years embraced copycat versions of complex biological drugs, known as biosimilars. "Biosimilars are must-have weaponry in financially sustaining healthcare systems on a global scale as well as significantly improving outcomes for an increasing number of patients throughout Europe and the rest of the world," ESMO President Professor Fortunato Ciardiello said in a statement.

18 Jan 2017 2:28pm GMT

Turtle the Size of 2 Earths: Stunning Sunspot Revealed in New Radio Images

Turtle the Size of 2 Earths: Stunning Sunspot Revealed in New Radio ImagesThe sprawling ground-based telescope is more usually used to probe radio waves released by some of the universe's most distant galaxies. In this case, though, it picked up waves released by the sun's chromosphere, which is the area just above the surface you see in visible light. Images returned by detecting radio waves at 2.5 and 3 millimeters show conditions at two different chromosphere depths - and the new views could lend more insight into the sun's physics.


18 Jan 2017 1:00pm GMT

Global warming could steal postcard-perfect weather days

Study finds global warming could steal postcard-perfect daysWASHINGTON (AP) - Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather.


18 Jan 2017 6:30am GMT