26 Jun 2019

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Theresa May to urge Donald Trump to take action against online hate

Theresa May to urge Donald Trump to take action against online hateTheresa May is to call for an international crackdown on online hate content, urging Donald Trump and other world leaders to ensure terrorist propaganda is removed within an hour of appearing on the internet. The Prime Minister will use her final summit of world leaders to appeal for action against the use of the internet by terrorists as well as more "cooperation" on tackling climate change. Speaking at the G20 meeting in Japan Mrs May will pitch the UK as a "global leader" on both issues, as she attempts to frame her legacy as Prime Minister. She is expected to cite her Government's proposals for a new online regulator, and its decision to legally enshrine a commitment to a target of zero net carbon emissions by 2050. Mr Trump will be seen as a primary target of Mrs May's interventions in Osaka. Last month the US declined to join the Christchurch Call, an international initiative under which governments and internet firms committed to improve their efforts to tackle extremist content. Mrs May is expected to urge world leaders to ensure terror content is taken down from the internet within 60 minutes of being uploaded after the Government's white paper on online harms warned that "a third of all links to Daesh propaganda ... are disseminated within an hour of upload." The European Parliament recently backed similar proposals. The Prime Minister will also call for leaders of the group of 20 major economies to put on a united front against Iran's "deeply destabilising activity". Mrs May said: "With the threat of climate change putting future generations at risk, vile terrorist propaganda continuing to spread online, and rising tensions in the Gulf, this summit is an opportunity for us to address critical global challenges affecting our nations ... As we have seen time and time again - we are always stronger when we work together. "And so my message to G20 leaders this week is this: it is only through international cooperation and compromise that we can protect our citizens' security and prosperity and make the world a safer and a better place to live." A senior government official said: "The PM will use her final G20 to underline the need for international cooperation and compromise in addressing the global challenges that we face." The official added that Mrs May would "highlight continued global leadership on UK priorities including climate change and terrorists' use of the internet."


26 Jun 2019 9:30pm GMT

Europeans on alert as heatwave intensifies

Europeans on alert as heatwave intensifiesAuthorities raised alerts Wednesday as Europe's record-breaking June heatwave threatened to intensify with temperatures heading into the 40s Celsius. The choking heat has prompted traffic restrictions, sparked forest fires and fanned debate over public nudity as sweltering Germans stripped off. "Global temperatures are increasing due to climate change," said Len Shaffrey, professor of climate science at the University of Reading.


26 Jun 2019 9:29pm GMT

Miami bakes in unusual heat before Democratic debates kick off

Miami bakes in unusual heat before Democratic debates kick offTen Democratic presidential contenders will take the debate stage in Miami on Wednesday night. Some of them may have noticed that the weather in town is unusually hot.Normally, temperatures in Miami around June's end max out at around 90 degrees Fahrenheit, explained Brian McNoldy, a senior research associate at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. But the coastal city has now had six consecutive days where the high temperature hit at least 94 degrees. On Monday the temperature hit 98 degrees (the second hottest day in Miami's recorded history).Daily temperature records have fallen in the area, which is expected these days."The warming climate does certainly play a role in setting new records," McNoldy said. "The baseline temperature is warmer than it was decades ago, so record lows rarely happen, while record highs are happening with increasing frequency."Overall in the U.S, twice as many daily heat records have been set as low records over the last decade, thanks to boosted average temperatures. "The trend is in exactly the direction we would expect as a result of a warming planet," climate scientist Michael Mann told Mashable in February. > Possibly our 8th 95-degree or hotter day this year coming up on Wednesday for Miami. Already today we set a record for the highest number of such extreme days in the first half of a year. Miami weather data dates back to 1896. Otherwise little rain for now, more by weekend. pic.twitter.com/k5Dev1WL5N> > -- John Morales (@JohnMoralesNBC6) June 26, 2019Climate change is likely to be an issue brought up at this year's Democratic debates, though coverage of the topic has been nearly non-existent in previous presidential debates. Democrats have expressed a profound concern for accelerating climate change.The Democratic National Committee (DNC) previously told Mashable that climate change is an issue "at the top of our list." However, the DNC said that none of the 12 primary debates will be devoted to the issue of climate change -- much to the frustration of climate change-focused candidate Governor Jay Inslee. SEE ALSO: We're fracking the hell out of the U.S.A. Can a president slam on the brakes?It's not just unusually hot in Miami, however. It's also quite dry."We also typically get frequent doses of rain during June, but we're now at eight consecutive days with barely a drop," noted McNoldy. > Is the SawgrassFire in the Everglades due to climatechange? Climate change doesn't CAUSE wildfires. It makes them burn bigger, more intense, and out of season. Fire is very common in Everglades, but right now it's much drier than normal (https://t.co/ZzJu0ZnUW6) pic.twitter.com/nKe3gjLaAy> > -- Dr. Crystal A. Kolden (@pyrogeog) June 25, 2019This has contributed to a large 41,500-acre fire burning through Everglades, releasing smoke into the skies around Miami. "This regional combination of dry weather and scorching temperatures has allowed a gigantic wildfire to blossom in central Broward County, something we tend to see happen during the dry winter months," said McNoldy. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


26 Jun 2019 9:14pm GMT

Graves of US WWII servicemen found on remote Pacific island

Graves of US WWII servicemen found on remote Pacific islandA nonprofit organization that searches for the remains of U.S. servicemen lost in past conflicts has found what officials believe are the graves of more than 30 Marines and sailors killed in one of the bloodiest battles of World War II. A team working on the remote Pacific atoll of Tarawa found the graves in March, said Mark Noah, president of History Flight. The remains are believed to belong to Marines and sailors from the 6th Marine Regiment killed during the last night of the three-day Battle of Tarawa.


26 Jun 2019 9:02pm GMT

New York City Declares A Climate Emergency

New York City Declares A Climate EmergencyThe Big Apple follows 17 other U.S. cities, including San Francisco, Oakland and Hoboken, New Jersey.


26 Jun 2019 8:03pm GMT

Cuomo Seeks Israeli Know-How for Fix to Struggling New York Subway

Cuomo Seeks Israeli Know-How for Fix to Struggling New York Subway(Bloomberg) -- In an effort to find the cheapest fix for New York subways plagued by shutdowns due to century-old signaling technology, Governor Andrew Cuomo is making a one-day visit to Israel to meet with companies developing innovative navigation systems.Israel's Technion, its primary engineering university, will host a meeting Friday between the governor and 25 entrepreneurs, engineers and academics specializing in biomedicine, drone technology and transportation, Cuomo said at a news conference Wednesday."You have tremendous growth in navigational systems," Cuomo said. "Why don't these companies think about an application for train and rail?"In January, Cuomo complained about perennial construction-cost overruns at the subway-operating Metropolitan Transportation Authority, decrying what he described as a "transportation-industrial complex" that discourages innovation by routinely awarding contracts to the same companies. After consulting with engineers from Cornell and Columbia universities, he proposed a way to repair a subway tunnel under the East River without a major shutdown. He has sought fresh advice on regional transportation ever since."We're throwing out old ways of thinking and we're identifying new technologies to get rehabilitation work done smarter and faster," said MTA Managing Director Veronique Hakim, who is joining Cuomo on the trip. "It's an important opportunity for us to open the door to new relationships at the MTA, to seek new technology on signal and navigation systems and encourage competition on MTA projects moving forward. Israel has made noteworthy advancements."The governor's trip began shortly after he held a Manhattan news conference Wednesday, aides said. He's scheduled to arrive in Israel on Thursday, returning to New York on Friday evening. In addition to drones, health care and transit technology, state economic development officials will try to lure businesses that work in fields such as clean energy, cybersecurity, artificial intelligence and information technology, the governor said.Another reason for the trip is to express solidarity with Israel and to express outrage at a jump in antisemitic incidents across the U.S. In New York state, where more Jews live than anywhere outside Israel, there has been an 83% increase in such incidents over the past two years, Cuomo said.To contact the reporter on this story: Henry Goldman in New York at hgoldman@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Flynn McRoberts at fmcroberts1@bloomberg.net, William Selway, Stephen MerelmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


26 Jun 2019 7:55pm GMT

Cuomo Seeks Israeli Know-How for Fix to Struggling New York Subway

Cuomo Seeks Israeli Know-How for Fix to Struggling New York Subway(Bloomberg) -- In an effort to find the cheapest fix for New York subways plagued by shutdowns due to century-old signaling technology, Governor Andrew Cuomo is making a one-day visit to Israel to meet with companies developing innovative navigation systems.Israel's Technion, its primary engineering university, will host a meeting Friday between the governor and 25 entrepreneurs, engineers and academics specializing in biomedicine, drone technology and transportation, Cuomo said at a news conference Wednesday."You have tremendous growth in navigational systems," Cuomo said. "Why don't these companies think about an application for train and rail?"In January, Cuomo complained about perennial construction-cost overruns at the subway-operating Metropolitan Transportation Authority, decrying what he described as a "transportation-industrial complex" that discourages innovation by routinely awarding contracts to the same companies. After consulting with engineers from Cornell and Columbia universities, he proposed a way to repair a subway tunnel under the East River without a major shutdown. He has sought fresh advice on regional transportation ever since."We're throwing out old ways of thinking and we're identifying new technologies to get rehabilitation work done smarter and faster," said MTA Managing Director Veronique Hakim, who is joining Cuomo on the trip. "It's an important opportunity for us to open the door to new relationships at the MTA, to seek new technology on signal and navigation systems and encourage competition on MTA projects moving forward. Israel has made noteworthy advancements."The governor's trip began shortly after he held a Manhattan news conference Wednesday, aides said. He's scheduled to arrive in Israel on Thursday, returning to New York on Friday evening. In addition to drones, health care and transit technology, state economic development officials will try to lure businesses that work in fields such as clean energy, cybersecurity, artificial intelligence and information technology, the governor said.Another reason for the trip is to express solidarity with Israel and to express outrage at a jump in antisemitic incidents across the U.S. In New York state, where more Jews live than anywhere outside Israel, there has been an 83% increase in such incidents over the past two years, Cuomo said.To contact the reporter on this story: Henry Goldman in New York at hgoldman@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Flynn McRoberts at fmcroberts1@bloomberg.net, William Selway, Stephen MerelmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


26 Jun 2019 7:55pm GMT

How I wish people talked about living with a BRCA mutation

How I wish people talked about living with a BRCA mutationIn many ways, I thought that having my mastectomy would be the end of my BRCA journey. However, in the four and a half years since my diagnosis, I realized that I'm at the beginning. While some folks in the community are comfortable with the term "previvor," this is one of the many reasons why I am not.


26 Jun 2019 7:39pm GMT

Trump Says U.S. Should Sue Facebook, Google in Latest Complaint

Trump Says U.S. Should Sue Facebook, Google in Latest Complaint(Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump complained again about supposed bias against conservatives at social media companies and said the U.S. government should sue Google and Facebook Inc. for unspecified wrongdoing.Trump complained in an interview with Fox Business Network on Wednesday that social media companies are run by Democrats and that Twitter has somehow made it difficult for people to follow his @realDonaldTrump account, from which he tweets prolifically."What they did to me on Twitter is incredible," Trump said in the interview with Fox's Maria Bartiromo. "You know I have millions and millions of followers but I will tell you they make it very hard for people to join me at Twitter and then make it very much harder for me to get out the message."Twitter said that followers of high-profile accounts may have been deleted as part of an effort to remove fake, abusive and malicious accounts.For More: Trump Accuses Twitter of Political Bias in Culling His FollowersThe White House said Wednesday it's planning a Social Media Summit July 11 to "bring together digital leaders for a robust conversation on the opportunities and challenges of today's online environment."Trump also complained about the European Union targeting U.S. technology companies in the interview. EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager has fined Google billions of dollars for antitrust violations and has opened an early-stage probe into Amazon.com Inc.'s potential use of data on smaller rivals' sales."I won't mention her name but she's actually considered to take Jean Claude's place because Jean Claude at some point is retiring," said Trump, referring to the possibility that Vestager could succeed European Commission President Jean-Claude Junker. "She hates the United States, perhaps worse than any person I've ever met. What she -- what she does to our country -- she's suing all our companies."For More: Faltering German Hands Vestager Chance to Claim Europe's Top Job"You know, look, we should be suing Google and Facebook and all that, which perhaps we will, okay," Trump said, without saying what he thinks the U.S. should sue the companies for. "They're suing everybody, they make it very -- almost impossible to do two-way business."Alphabet Inc.'s Google, Facebook and Twitter Inc. shares dipped on the news before recovering. Google was down 1.2%, Facebook fell less than 1% while Twitter gained 1.4% to Wednesday afternoon in New York.Representatives for Google and Facebook didn't comment.Social media companies have sought to more aggressively police their sites for what they consider hate speech and fraudulent accounts, but say they have no policies targeting conservatives.Trump's threat comes after Project Veritas, a conservative organization known for deceptively edited hidden-camera videos, released footage this week allegedly depicting a Google employee saying the company wants to prevent Trump's re-election.In a blog post, the woman from the video said the notion Google is trying to sway the election "is absolute, unadulterated nonsense."She said she was explaining that her former team at the company "is working to help prevent the types of online foreign interference that happened in 2016."House HearingAll three companies were scheduled to testify before a House committee Wednesday on efforts to combat terrorist content and misinformation.Representative Mike Rogers, the top Republican on the House Homeland Security Committee holding the hearing said he had "serious questions" about Google's ability to be fair given the Project Veritas video."This report, and others like it, are a stark reminder of why the founders created the First Amendment," Rogers said in his opening statement. "We are in trouble" if the views in the video represented Google company policy.Google's global director of information policy testified Wednesday that no single employee could skew search results based on her political beliefs."We are in the trust business," the executive, Derek Slater, told Rogers. "We have a long-term incentive to get that right."Big technology companies are coming under heightened scrutiny in Washington from the government and Congress. Trump's Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission have taken the first steps toward investigating four big platforms for antitrust violations by splitting jurisdiction over them. The Justice Department has taken responsibility for Google and Apple Inc., while the FTC will oversee Facebook and Amazon.The House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee, led by Rhode Island Democrat David Cicilline, has launched a broad investigation into the nation's biggest technology companies starting with a focus on how companies like Google and Facebook have impacted the news industry.For more: House Panel Kicks Off Antitrust Probe With Focus on News MediaSeparately, state attorneys general, including Nebraska's Doug Peterson and Louisiana's Jeff Landry -- both Republicans -- are advancing a broad inquiry into whether the biggest U.S. technology platforms are violating antitrust and consumer protection statutes.(Updates with additional Trump quotes in seventh paragraph)\--With assistance from David McLaughlin.To contact the reporters on this story: Alyza Sebenius in Washington at asebenius@bloomberg.net;Ben Brody in Washington, D.C. at btenerellabr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Alex Wayne at awayne3@bloomberg.net, ;Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


26 Jun 2019 7:13pm GMT

The Congestive Heart Failure Warnings I Missed

The Congestive Heart Failure Warnings I MissedLori Ann Wood discusses the signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure that can be easy to miss, and how this heart disease affects her.


26 Jun 2019 6:54pm GMT

PHOTOS: Moon rock samples sealed since Apollo missions

PHOTOS: Moon rock samples sealed since Apollo missionsWhat better way to mark this summer's 50th anniversary of humanity's first footsteps on the moon than by sharing a bit of the lunar loot.


26 Jun 2019 6:11pm GMT

Oregon's 11 Fugitive Senators Remain at Large, Stalling Key Bill

Oregon's 11 Fugitive Senators Remain at Large, Stalling Key Bill(Bloomberg) -- Six days after they went AWOL to sabotage a bill to curb carbon emissions in Oregon, 11 lawmakers are still hiding out -- in the latest, and weirdest, flashpoint in the U.S. divide over climate change.The Republicans fled the capitol in Salem to prevent the senate from reaching a quorum to vote on a cap-and-trade program similar to California's. Democratic Governor Kate Brown threatened to dispatch state police to round up the missing senators. One, Brian Boquist, responded by saying the authorities should "send bachelors and come heavily armed."To make matters more bizarre, it's not clear they actually needed to bolt. According to top Democrats, there may not be enough support among their own ranks in the chamber to pass the legislation. Whether that was the case when the Republicans skedaddled is a mystery.Whatever the backstory, the consequences could be dire for bills other than the one behind the ruckus, including funding measures for crucial operations such as wildfire response and prevention. They can't move forward if at least some of the truants don't return before the session ends."The Oregon situation is extremely troubling," said Kit Kennedy, senior director of the climate and clean energy program at the Natural Resources Defense Council. "It's a breakdown in the democratic process."In many ways, Oregon is a microcosm of a polarized U.S., a state where left-versus-right, urban-versus-rural politics often bubble up, though the tension there hasn't spurred quite such radical action before.The Republicans apparently saw no other way to stop something they view as an assault on their constituents, with a disproportionately negative effect on loggers and farmers. Democrats are in the legislative majority and many local companies, including Nike Inc., back the cap-and-trade plan, which would impose carbon-emissions limits and force businesses that exceed them to buy or trade for a diminishing pool of allowances to pollute.The house passed the measure on June 17. The capitol building was briefly closed five days later after militia groups threatened to join a protest, though demonstration ended up being peaceful, attended by fewer than 100 people.By Tuesday, the senate president, Peter Courtney, was on the floor declaring the bill pretty much dead. Rick Osborn, a spokesman for Majority Leader Ginny Burdick, said it didn't even have enough Democratic votes last week. Climate-action advocates who had been keeping a tally said that was baloney.Activists protested. The governor said on Twitter, "Are Senate Democrats against climate change legislation or are they against democracy?" Stuck, the legislature adjourned until June 30. GoFundMe AccountAs wildly as it's playing out, the clash underscores America's conflicted attitude and approach to global warming. Democratic presidential candidates have used the threat of climate change as a rallying cry and several states are moving forward with aggressive programs. The Trump administration has actively worked to roll back Obama policies to curb emissions and continues to question the impact -- in some cases the existence -- of the problem.In Oregon, a blue state with vast stretches of relatively lightly populated red, Oregon Business for Climate lobbied for the cap-and-trade proposal, which aims to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions to 80% of 1990 levels by 2050. There was a crack last week when Dutch Bros., a coffee chain based in Grants Pass in the southern part of the state, pulled out of the coalition, saying the company was "dedicated to being neutral on all issues related to politics and religion."Meanwhile, supporters of the absent legislators set up a GoFundMe account to raise money for them, wherever they are, and donations had reached more than $35,000 on Tuesday. It's uncertain whether Oregon law would allow the senators, who face fines of up to $500 a day, to accept the money.Kate Gillem, a spokeswoman for Minority Leader Herman Baertschiger, who represents a district around Grants Pass, said she didn't know where he and his colleagues were holed up but that there has been "ongoing communication" with Democrats. (In case any of the 11 had crossed the border into Washington, Governor Jay Inslee, a Democratic presidential hopeful, said on Twitter that they weren't welcome.)The skipping-town tactic has been deployed elsewhere by state lawmakers affronted by issues important to the majority. In 2011, Democrats in Wisconsin escaped to Illinois to deny Republicans a quorum for a vote on anti-union legislation. In 2003, Democrats left Texas for Oklahoma to avoid voting on a plan to redraw the U.S. congressional districts to Republican advantage.In the end, both bills eventually passed, with Republicans finding workarounds. The resulting laws were challenged in litigation that lasted for years.Every day without a quorum in Oregon could threaten future state operations, though the governor has said she's preparing for a special session in July. "It's anything but business as usual, because we're not able to do business on any issue," said Rick Osborn, a spokesman for Majority Leader Ginny Burdick, who represents part of the Portland metro area.According to Gillem, the carbon bill has been been misbranded. "It's a gas and emissions tax, and it hasn't been portrayed that way. It would mean an additional $50 a month for a family of four in this state, in gasoline costs and natural gas and electric bills. That adds up to $600 a year, and it's not chump change."Oregon had seemed to have been on the way to being part of a trend. Last week, New York passed a bill to set the country's most aggressive clean-energy target, more than triple the state's solar capacity and unleash wind power off the coast, joining a movement for 100% clean-power goals.Puerto Rico approved legislation in April; California, Hawaii and New Mexico have made pledges to do the same. The U.S. issued a report Monday showing that 29 states and the District of Columbia set renewable targets last year, accounting for almost two-thirds of all of the electricity sold in the U.S. So far this year, at least four states and D.C. have raised their targets.None of the climate-action moves will come, of course, without costs. The Oregon Legislative Revenue Office said the bill would force significant change in "much of the energy sector and the state economy." That's a reason senate Republicans will continue to resist it, according to the minority leader."I've been threatened with being arrested. I've been threatened with fines. I've been threatened with election violations if I do not cooperate," Baertschiger said in a videotaped interview posted online.He said he's not budging.(Updates with session adjournment in 10th paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Jeffrey Taylor in San Francisco at jtaylor48@bloomberg.net;Will Wade in New York at wwade4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lynn Doan at ldoan6@bloomberg.net, Anne Reifenberg, Reg GaleFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


26 Jun 2019 6:02pm GMT

Oregon's 11 Fugitive Senators Remain at Large, Stalling Key Bill

Oregon's 11 Fugitive Senators Remain at Large, Stalling Key Bill(Bloomberg) -- Six days after they went AWOL to sabotage a bill to curb carbon emissions in Oregon, 11 lawmakers are still hiding out -- in the latest, and weirdest, flashpoint in the U.S. divide over climate change.The Republicans fled the capitol in Salem to prevent the senate from reaching a quorum to vote on a cap-and-trade program similar to California's. Democratic Governor Kate Brown threatened to dispatch state police to round up the missing senators. One, Brian Boquist, responded by saying the authorities should "send bachelors and come heavily armed."To make matters more bizarre, it's not clear they actually needed to bolt. According to top Democrats, there may not be enough support among their own ranks in the chamber to pass the legislation. Whether that was the case when the Republicans skedaddled is a mystery.Whatever the backstory, the consequences could be dire for bills other than the one behind the ruckus, including funding measures for crucial operations such as wildfire response and prevention. They can't move forward if at least some of the truants don't return before the session ends."The Oregon situation is extremely troubling," said Kit Kennedy, senior director of the climate and clean energy program at the Natural Resources Defense Council. "It's a breakdown in the democratic process."In many ways, Oregon is a microcosm of a polarized U.S., a state where left-versus-right, urban-versus-rural politics often bubble up, though the tension there hasn't spurred quite such radical action before.The Republicans apparently saw no other way to stop something they view as an assault on their constituents, with a disproportionately negative effect on loggers and farmers. Democrats are in the legislative majority and many local companies, including Nike Inc., back the cap-and-trade plan, which would impose carbon-emissions limits and force businesses that exceed them to buy or trade for a diminishing pool of allowances to pollute.The house passed the measure on June 17. The capitol building was briefly closed five days later after militia groups threatened to join a protest, though demonstration ended up being peaceful, attended by fewer than 100 people.By Tuesday, the senate president, Peter Courtney, was on the floor declaring the bill pretty much dead. Rick Osborn, a spokesman for Majority Leader Ginny Burdick, said it didn't even have enough Democratic votes last week. Climate-action advocates who had been keeping a tally said that was baloney.Activists protested. The governor said on Twitter, "Are Senate Democrats against climate change legislation or are they against democracy?" Stuck, the legislature adjourned until June 30. GoFundMe AccountAs wildly as it's playing out, the clash underscores America's conflicted attitude and approach to global warming. Democratic presidential candidates have used the threat of climate change as a rallying cry and several states are moving forward with aggressive programs. The Trump administration has actively worked to roll back Obama policies to curb emissions and continues to question the impact -- in some cases the existence -- of the problem.In Oregon, a blue state with vast stretches of relatively lightly populated red, Oregon Business for Climate lobbied for the cap-and-trade proposal, which aims to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions to 80% of 1990 levels by 2050. There was a crack last week when Dutch Bros., a coffee chain based in Grants Pass in the southern part of the state, pulled out of the coalition, saying the company was "dedicated to being neutral on all issues related to politics and religion."Meanwhile, supporters of the absent legislators set up a GoFundMe account to raise money for them, wherever they are, and donations had reached more than $35,000 on Tuesday. It's uncertain whether Oregon law would allow the senators, who face fines of up to $500 a day, to accept the money.Kate Gillem, a spokeswoman for Minority Leader Herman Baertschiger, who represents a district around Grants Pass, said she didn't know where he and his colleagues were holed up but that there has been "ongoing communication" with Democrats. (In case any of the 11 had crossed the border into Washington, Governor Jay Inslee, a Democratic presidential hopeful, said on Twitter that they weren't welcome.)The skipping-town tactic has been deployed elsewhere by state lawmakers affronted by issues important to the majority. In 2011, Democrats in Wisconsin escaped to Illinois to deny Republicans a quorum for a vote on anti-union legislation. In 2003, Democrats left Texas for Oklahoma to avoid voting on a plan to redraw the U.S. congressional districts to Republican advantage.In the end, both bills eventually passed, with Republicans finding workarounds. The resulting laws were challenged in litigation that lasted for years.Every day without a quorum in Oregon could threaten future state operations, though the governor has said she's preparing for a special session in July. "It's anything but business as usual, because we're not able to do business on any issue," said Rick Osborn, a spokesman for Majority Leader Ginny Burdick, who represents part of the Portland metro area.According to Gillem, the carbon bill has been been misbranded. "It's a gas and emissions tax, and it hasn't been portrayed that way. It would mean an additional $50 a month for a family of four in this state, in gasoline costs and natural gas and electric bills. That adds up to $600 a year, and it's not chump change."Oregon had seemed to have been on the way to being part of a trend. Last week, New York passed a bill to set the country's most aggressive clean-energy target, more than triple the state's solar capacity and unleash wind power off the coast, joining a movement for 100% clean-power goals.Puerto Rico approved legislation in April; California, Hawaii and New Mexico have made pledges to do the same. The U.S. issued a report Monday showing that 29 states and the District of Columbia set renewable targets last year, accounting for almost two-thirds of all of the electricity sold in the U.S. So far this year, at least four states and D.C. have raised their targets.None of the climate-action moves will come, of course, without costs. The Oregon Legislative Revenue Office said the bill would force significant change in "much of the energy sector and the state economy." That's a reason senate Republicans will continue to resist it, according to the minority leader."I've been threatened with being arrested. I've been threatened with fines. I've been threatened with election violations if I do not cooperate," Baertschiger said in a videotaped interview posted online.He said he's not budging.(Updates with session adjournment in 10th paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Jeffrey Taylor in San Francisco at jtaylor48@bloomberg.net;Will Wade in New York at wwade4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lynn Doan at ldoan6@bloomberg.net, Anne Reifenberg, Reg GaleFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


26 Jun 2019 6:02pm GMT

OK Go contest winners will launch their cosmic creations on Blue Origin spaceship

OK Go contest winners will launch their cosmic creations on Blue Origin spaceshipThree students are getting ready for a space experiment that will use gravity and magnetism to simulate the origin of planet Earth. Another trio plans to create a musical composition that's based on blips of cosmic radiation. We're not talking about strictly scientific experiments here: These are the winning entries in an art contest set up by the performance-art rock band OK Go to fly on Blue Origin's New Shepard suborbital spaceship. The Art in Space contest follows up on OK Go's viral "Upside Down & Inside Out" video, which splashed paint all over the interior of an airplane during… Read More


26 Jun 2019 5:59pm GMT

FDA approves expanded label for Regeneron/Sanofi's Dupixent

FDA approves expanded label for Regeneron/Sanofi's DupixentThe expanded label, which could significantly boost annual sales, is for use with other medicines to treat patients suffering from chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, the companies said in a joint statement. The FDA first approved Dupixent in 2017 for moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, or eczema, and in 2018 it won U.S. approval to treat moderate-to-severe asthma as well. Chronic rhinosinusitis is a persistent inflammation of the mucous membranes in the nose and sinuses that can lead to development of nasal polyps - teardrop shaped, noncancerous growths that can cause irritation and swelling.


26 Jun 2019 5:49pm GMT

Protesters gather at Britain's parliament to urge climate action

Protesters gather at Britain's parliament to urge climate actionAt least 12,000 people converged on Britain's parliament on Wednesday to lobby lawmakers to start driving the sweeping changes needed to meet the country's new target to cut net carbon emissions to zero by 2050, organisers said. In the largest environmental lobby held at the British parliament, delegations from across the country met at least 200 MPs, according to organisers at The Climate Coalition and Greener UK, which combine more than 130 environmental groups. Although Britain's carbon emissions are now tiny relative to big polluters such as China and the United States, the public mood in the country could have wider significance for global climate diplomacy.


26 Jun 2019 5:42pm GMT