26 Jun 2019

feedPlanet Python

NumFOCUS: Moderna joins NumFOCUS Corporate Sponsors

The post Moderna joins NumFOCUS Corporate Sponsors appeared first on NumFOCUS.

26 Jun 2019 6:02pm GMT

NumFOCUS: Moderna joins NumFOCUS Corporate Sponsors

The post Moderna joins NumFOCUS Corporate Sponsors appeared first on NumFOCUS.

26 Jun 2019 6:02pm GMT

PyCon: PyCon 2019 Code of Conduct Transparency Report

PyCon 2019 Transparency Report

The PyCon Code of Conduct sets standards for how our community interacts with others during the conference. A Code of Conduct without appropriate reporting and response procedures is difficult to enforce transparently, and furthermore a lack of transparency in the outcomes of Code of Conduct incidents leaves the community without knowledge of how or if the organizers worked to resolve incidents.
In our efforts to continue to improve how PyCon handles CoC incidents, staff, volunteers and community members participated in a CoC training prior to PyCon 2019. In having more people trained we provided a more thorough process for reporting and responses.
With that in mind, we have prepared the following to help the community understand what kind of incidents we received reports about and how the PyCon staff responded.

Overview

Reports

This year, PyCon Staff and Incident Responders were notified of 11 incidents. For summary purposes we categorized each report using a tenant of our standards and expectations of attendees.
13 incidents were reported this year, and 10 were considered to be potential PyCon Code of Conduct matters:

Resolutions

Of the 10 potential PyCon Code of Conduct matters:

Summary of Reported Incidents

26 Jun 2019 5:03pm GMT

PyCon: PyCon 2019 Code of Conduct Transparency Report

PyCon 2019 Transparency Report

The PyCon Code of Conduct sets standards for how our community interacts with others during the conference. A Code of Conduct without appropriate reporting and response procedures is difficult to enforce transparently, and furthermore a lack of transparency in the outcomes of Code of Conduct incidents leaves the community without knowledge of how or if the organizers worked to resolve incidents.
In our efforts to continue to improve how PyCon handles CoC incidents, staff, volunteers and community members participated in a CoC training prior to PyCon 2019. In having more people trained we provided a more thorough process for reporting and responses.
With that in mind, we have prepared the following to help the community understand what kind of incidents we received reports about and how the PyCon staff responded.

Overview

Reports

This year, PyCon Staff and Incident Responders were notified of 11 incidents. For summary purposes we categorized each report using a tenant of our standards and expectations of attendees.
13 incidents were reported this year, and 10 were considered to be potential PyCon Code of Conduct matters:

Resolutions

Of the 10 potential PyCon Code of Conduct matters:

Summary of Reported Incidents

26 Jun 2019 5:03pm GMT

Real Python: Python Community Interview With Katrina Durance

With PyCon US 2019 over, I decided to catch up with a PyCon first-timer, Katrina Durance. I was curious to see how she found the experience and what her highlights were. I also wanted to understand how attending a conference like PyCon influenced her programming chops.

Ricky: Let's start with the same questions I ask all my guests. How'd you get into programming? When did you start using Python?

Katrina Durance

Katrina: Python was my first programming course in grad school back in 2013. I also learned R and SQL. The two jobs I've been in since I graduated have been completely SQL-focused, so Python and R fell by the wayside.

Since I work at an arts college in Chicago (Columbia College Chicago) I'm able to take courses for free. We have a gaming program so all our programming courses are game related. Since I'm a gamer and a very visual learner, I decided to take a C# course where we worked on building small games. I liked it.

I really struggled a lot with Python when I first learned it, but working with a programming language in a visual context started to clarify a lot of concepts for me. I knew after that course that I wanted to build my skills to get into full-time programming. I eventually came up with a study plan and decided to return to my Python roots at the beginning of this year.

Ricky: This year you attended PyCon US for the first time. I'm curious why this year was your first. What changed or made you want to go this time around?

Katrina: What really clinched it was knowing that there was going to be a group from PythonistaCafe, and a big contingent from the Chicago Python User Group meetup there. So I knew I would see some friendly faces. I didn't feel I was doing it all alone.

Ricky: Everyone's PyCon experience is different. I'm wondering if you had a standout moment this year? Is there one thing that you'll remember synonymously with your first PyCon experience?

Katrina: The mentored sprints were a big deal for me. I ended up working on an issue on a tool (Hypothesis) that I didn't understand because I haven't learned much about testing at all yet.

I was feeling frustrated and concerned that everything would go over my head. But our mentor was amazing and so encouraging and showed me a bunch of things I was learning and kept me going to the end. Now I have a closed issue on the software with my name on it, which is pretty cool.

Ricky: We, of course, met face to face several times over the weekend. But most notably at the PythonistaCafe open space. How was your open space experience? Did you learn anything new, or were there any actionable takeaways?

Katrina: I was excited about the PythonistaCafe open space because of the chance to meet some of the folks I've interacted with or just seen on the forum, and I wasn't disappointed.

I hosted an open space for self-taught programmers like me. I was stunned when 30-ish people showed up. I did my best to manage it and got some positive feedback and helpful advice.

The PyCon Africa meetup was very enlightening because I learned that the reason we're not seeing a boom in innovation from Africa yet is that the internet is prohibitively expensive in every country represented in the room. It didn't matter if it was government regulated or privately owned. I would love to help figure out how to solve that problem.

Pyhtonista Cafe Open Space - PyconPythonistaCafe Members Coming Together at a PyCon Open Space

Ricky: There is so much to do at PyCon that there's just not enough time to do it all. So was there anything you wish you had done or a talk you'd missed that you wish you hadn't? Anything you'd do differently next time?

Katrina: I felt PyCon was what I was hoping it would be for this first time around, to be honest. Next year I want to stay for the sprints, which people kept telling me were amazing.

Ricky: So for those reading this that have yet to go to their first PyCon, this might be the most important question… How did attending PyCon affect how you will write your Python code going forward?

Katrina: I had to talk about my code. When you're self-taught, you don't get a lot of opportunities to talk through your code. Through the conversations I had at PyCon, I was encouraged to be more deliberate about taking advantage of my Slack and local Python communities to practice those communication skills.

In other words, I need to notch up my courage and not worry if I'm not coding it or explaining it well yet. I just need to keep coding and explaining.

Ricky: Last but not least, what else do you get up to in your spare time? What other hobbies and interests do you have, aside from Python and coding? Anything you'd like to plug?

Katrina: I love all things Sci-Fi and weird: movies, TV series, books, etc. I'm a LEGO enthusiast and have a penchant for building lost temples out of my love for H. P. Lovecraft stories. I really like VR and enjoy playing games on my Oculus Go. I also make jewelry out of felt, found objects, or even LEGO pieces.

If you'd like to catch up with Katrina and say hi, drop her a message on Twitter.

If there's someone from the Python community that you'd love me to interview, leave a comment below and let me know.


[ Improve Your Python With 🐍 Python Tricks 💌 - Get a short & sweet Python Trick delivered to your inbox every couple of days. >> Click here to learn more and see examples ]

26 Jun 2019 2:00pm GMT

Real Python: Python Community Interview With Katrina Durance

With PyCon US 2019 over, I decided to catch up with a PyCon first-timer, Katrina Durance. I was curious to see how she found the experience and what her highlights were. I also wanted to understand how attending a conference like PyCon influenced her programming chops.

Ricky: Let's start with the same questions I ask all my guests. How'd you get into programming? When did you start using Python?

Katrina Durance

Katrina: Python was my first programming course in grad school back in 2013. I also learned R and SQL. The two jobs I've been in since I graduated have been completely SQL-focused, so Python and R fell by the wayside.

Since I work at an arts college in Chicago (Columbia College Chicago) I'm able to take courses for free. We have a gaming program so all our programming courses are game related. Since I'm a gamer and a very visual learner, I decided to take a C# course where we worked on building small games. I liked it.

I really struggled a lot with Python when I first learned it, but working with a programming language in a visual context started to clarify a lot of concepts for me. I knew after that course that I wanted to build my skills to get into full-time programming. I eventually came up with a study plan and decided to return to my Python roots at the beginning of this year.

Ricky: This year you attended PyCon US for the first time. I'm curious why this year was your first. What changed or made you want to go this time around?

Katrina: What really clinched it was knowing that there was going to be a group from PythonistaCafe, and a big contingent from the Chicago Python User Group meetup there. So I knew I would see some friendly faces. I didn't feel I was doing it all alone.

Ricky: Everyone's PyCon experience is different. I'm wondering if you had a standout moment this year? Is there one thing that you'll remember synonymously with your first PyCon experience?

Katrina: The mentored sprints were a big deal for me. I ended up working on an issue on a tool (Hypothesis) that I didn't understand because I haven't learned much about testing at all yet.

I was feeling frustrated and concerned that everything would go over my head. But our mentor was amazing and so encouraging and showed me a bunch of things I was learning and kept me going to the end. Now I have a closed issue on the software with my name on it, which is pretty cool.

Ricky: We, of course, met face to face several times over the weekend. But most notably at the PythonistaCafe open space. How was your open space experience? Did you learn anything new, or were there any actionable takeaways?

Katrina: I was excited about the PythonistaCafe open space because of the chance to meet some of the folks I've interacted with or just seen on the forum, and I wasn't disappointed.

I hosted an open space for self-taught programmers like me. I was stunned when 30-ish people showed up. I did my best to manage it and got some positive feedback and helpful advice.

The PyCon Africa meetup was very enlightening because I learned that the reason we're not seeing a boom in innovation from Africa yet is that the internet is prohibitively expensive in every country represented in the room. It didn't matter if it was government regulated or privately owned. I would love to help figure out how to solve that problem.

Pyhtonista Cafe Open Space - PyconPythonistaCafe Members Coming Together at a PyCon Open Space

Ricky: There is so much to do at PyCon that there's just not enough time to do it all. So was there anything you wish you had done or a talk you'd missed that you wish you hadn't? Anything you'd do differently next time?

Katrina: I felt PyCon was what I was hoping it would be for this first time around, to be honest. Next year I want to stay for the sprints, which people kept telling me were amazing.

Ricky: So for those reading this that have yet to go to their first PyCon, this might be the most important question… How did attending PyCon affect how you will write your Python code going forward?

Katrina: I had to talk about my code. When you're self-taught, you don't get a lot of opportunities to talk through your code. Through the conversations I had at PyCon, I was encouraged to be more deliberate about taking advantage of my Slack and local Python communities to practice those communication skills.

In other words, I need to notch up my courage and not worry if I'm not coding it or explaining it well yet. I just need to keep coding and explaining.

Ricky: Last but not least, what else do you get up to in your spare time? What other hobbies and interests do you have, aside from Python and coding? Anything you'd like to plug?

Katrina: I love all things Sci-Fi and weird: movies, TV series, books, etc. I'm a LEGO enthusiast and have a penchant for building lost temples out of my love for H. P. Lovecraft stories. I really like VR and enjoy playing games on my Oculus Go. I also make jewelry out of felt, found objects, or even LEGO pieces.

If you'd like to catch up with Katrina and say hi, drop her a message on Twitter.

If there's someone from the Python community that you'd love me to interview, leave a comment below and let me know.


[ Improve Your Python With 🐍 Python Tricks 💌 - Get a short & sweet Python Trick delivered to your inbox every couple of days. >> Click here to learn more and see examples ]

26 Jun 2019 2:00pm GMT

EuroPython: EuroPython 2019: Mobile Conference App available

We are pleased to announce the mobile conference app for EuroPython 2019, again hosted on the Attendify platform:

image

EuroPython 2019 Conference App

Engage with the conference and its attendees

The mobile app gives you access to the conference schedule (even offline), helps you in planing your conference experience (create your personal schedule with reminders) and provides a rich social engagement platform for all attendees.

You can create a profile within the app or link this to your existing social accounts, share messages and photos, and easily reach out to other fellow attendees - all from within the app.

Vital for all EuroPython 2019 attendees

We will again use the conference app to keep you updated by sending updates of the schedule and inform you of important announcements via push notifications, so please consider downloading it.

Many useful features

Please see our EuroPython 2019 Conference App page for more details on features and guides on how to use them.

Don't forget to get your EuroPython ticket

If you want to join the EuroPython fun, be sure to get your tickets as soon as possible.

Enjoy,
-
EuroPython 2019 Team
https://ep2019.europython.eu/
https://www.europython-society.org/

26 Jun 2019 8:22am GMT

EuroPython: EuroPython 2019: Mobile Conference App available

We are pleased to announce the mobile conference app for EuroPython 2019, again hosted on the Attendify platform:

image

EuroPython 2019 Conference App

Engage with the conference and its attendees

The mobile app gives you access to the conference schedule (even offline), helps you in planing your conference experience (create your personal schedule with reminders) and provides a rich social engagement platform for all attendees.

You can create a profile within the app or link this to your existing social accounts, share messages and photos, and easily reach out to other fellow attendees - all from within the app.

Vital for all EuroPython 2019 attendees

We will again use the conference app to keep you updated by sending updates of the schedule and inform you of important announcements via push notifications, so please consider downloading it.

Many useful features

Please see our EuroPython 2019 Conference App page for more details on features and guides on how to use them.

Don't forget to get your EuroPython ticket

If you want to join the EuroPython fun, be sure to get your tickets as soon as possible.

Enjoy,
-
EuroPython 2019 Team
https://ep2019.europython.eu/
https://www.europython-society.org/

26 Jun 2019 8:22am GMT

Codementor: Logistic Regression In Python | Python For Data Science

Logistic regression in Python using sklearn to predict the outcome by determining the relationship between dependent and one or more independent variables.

26 Jun 2019 6:33am GMT

Codementor: Logistic Regression In Python | Python For Data Science

Logistic regression in Python using sklearn to predict the outcome by determining the relationship between dependent and one or more independent variables.

26 Jun 2019 6:33am GMT

IslandT: Python is still not there yet

I have been blogging about Python programming language for a while since 2017, the reason which I continue to write about this programing language is due to the popularity of this language in the programming languages world! At the moment Python is ranked mostly in the top three positions beginning at 2019 at both TIOBE Index and The PYPL PopularitY of Programming Language Index. Those impressive statistic figures from the above sites certainly suggest that Python is already the world number 1, and indeed there are a few reasons that will further solidify that claim. 1) The uncertainty of Java, which now requires the Java developer to pay for using the Java programming language. My Java knowledge has been stopped at Java 7 and goes no further than that because I simply can't afford to pay such an expensive amount of fees just to use Java to create a free application or game for the computer users. Recently I have started to pick up Kotlin which is based on Java just in case I can't use Java to develop Android application anymore without paying a fee in the future, but will Java ask for the fee from the Kotlin developer in the future as well? I have a feeling that the Android OS will see more issues in the near future. 2) The future of the C series languages depends on the windows application developer as well as the game developer. Just like Java, C type of programming language can run in all OS, ranging from Linux to Mac to Windows. But I have spotted 2 problems for series C, 1) for a game developer who uses the famous game engines such as Unity or Unreal, it will usually take a very long time to compile his c# or c++ programming code even with just a small changes, for those of you who have used C# to develop your Unity game before, how long will it takes for the Unity engine to recompile the C# code even just for a very small changes in your game code before you can see your game in action? After a few times using Unity to develop the game, I have now switched to Godot where the compile time is indeed very fast as compared to Unity. 2) pointer is not a good idea in c++, even the experienced programmer will make a silly mistake by pointing a variable to one of the rubbish address, c++ is the world most difficult to debug programming language, it is really hard for me to spot the bug within the c++ program because sometime the bug will not appear during the compilation time. So there you have it, with Java and the series C out of the path, Python is now ready to become the world number 1. All the Python supporters certainly will be very happy about that after they have spent thousands of hour learning and creating an application for Python and now it is time to harvest their Soya Bean! But not too fast, because I think there are a few areas Python still needs to improve before Python can rule the world! Here are those parts that I think Python.org needs to work on if it really has the ambition to become world number 1!

  1. Besides Pygame, not many game engines are willing to use Python, I have seen Godot allows the developer to write a game with Python a few years ago but that whole Python framework is still in the beta stage, it is already 2019, come on man! As for Unity and the Unreal Engine, I have never seen any progress at all.
  2. Web development, Python seems to be a good idea to replace php and Javascript when it comes to web development, but besides django, I really do not see any new famous Python web development framework around at this moment. And django is very hard to set up, the web hosting sites that allow Python to run on their web server are close to 0, can we really see the web hosting provider actively promotes Python programming language as an alternative to Javascript in the front end and the php in the back end in the future?
  3. Mobile development, we have seen C# and C++ application for Android OS, when will we see Python as an alternative programming language to replace Java? And will Python become another alternative besides Swift which has replaced Objective C when it comes to iphone application development?

So much for that, lastly I just hope to see Blender reconsiders to bring the Blender game engine back to live again because it is the only well-known game engine which supports Python at the moment.

What is your thought regarding this subject, leave your comment below this post so we can talk about the topic in the future if we really need to.

26 Jun 2019 5:40am GMT

IslandT: Python is still not there yet

I have been blogging about Python programming language for a while since 2017, the reason which I continue to write about this programing language is due to the popularity of this language in the programming languages world! At the moment Python is ranked mostly in the top three positions beginning at 2019 at both TIOBE Index and The PYPL PopularitY of Programming Language Index. Those impressive statistic figures from the above sites certainly suggest that Python is already the world number 1, and indeed there are a few reasons that will further solidify that claim. 1) The uncertainty of Java, which now requires the Java developer to pay for using the Java programming language. My Java knowledge has been stopped at Java 7 and goes no further than that because I simply can't afford to pay such an expensive amount of fees just to use Java to create a free application or game for the computer users. Recently I have started to pick up Kotlin which is based on Java just in case I can't use Java to develop Android application anymore without paying a fee in the future, but will Java ask for the fee from the Kotlin developer in the future as well? I have a feeling that the Android OS will see more issues in the near future. 2) The future of the C series languages depends on the windows application developer as well as the game developer. Just like Java, C type of programming language can run in all OS, ranging from Linux to Mac to Windows. But I have spotted 2 problems for series C, 1) for a game developer who uses the famous game engines such as Unity or Unreal, it will usually take a very long time to compile his c# or c++ programming code even with just a small changes, for those of you who have used C# to develop your Unity game before, how long will it takes for the Unity engine to recompile the C# code even just for a very small changes in your game code before you can see your game in action? After a few times using Unity to develop the game, I have now switched to Godot where the compile time is indeed very fast as compared to Unity. 2) pointer is not a good idea in c++, even the experienced programmer will make a silly mistake by pointing a variable to one of the rubbish address, c++ is the world most difficult to debug programming language, it is really hard for me to spot the bug within the c++ program because sometime the bug will not appear during the compilation time. So there you have it, with Java and the series C out of the path, Python is now ready to become the world number 1. All the Python supporters certainly will be very happy about that after they have spent thousands of hour learning and creating an application for Python and now it is time to harvest their Soya Bean! But not too fast, because I think there are a few areas Python still needs to improve before Python can rule the world! Here are those parts that I think Python.org needs to work on if it really has the ambition to become world number 1!

  1. Besides Pygame, not many game engines are willing to use Python, I have seen Godot allows the developer to write a game with Python a few years ago but that whole Python framework is still in the beta stage, it is already 2019, come on man! As for Unity and the Unreal Engine, I have never seen any progress at all.
  2. Web development, Python seems to be a good idea to replace php and Javascript when it comes to web development, but besides django, I really do not see any new famous Python web development framework around at this moment. And django is very hard to set up, the web hosting sites that allow Python to run on their web server are close to 0, can we really see the web hosting provider actively promotes Python programming language as an alternative to Javascript in the front end and the php in the back end in the future?
  3. Mobile development, we have seen C# and C++ application for Android OS, when will we see Python as an alternative programming language to replace Java? And will Python become another alternative besides Swift which has replaced Objective C when it comes to iphone application development?

So much for that, lastly I just hope to see Blender reconsiders to bring the Blender game engine back to live again because it is the only well-known game engine which supports Python at the moment.

What is your thought regarding this subject, leave your comment below this post so we can talk about the topic in the future if we really need to.

26 Jun 2019 5:40am GMT

Full Stack Python: Developer-led Sales for Startups

This blog post contains the slides along with a loose transcript from my talk on the promises and perils of developer-led sales as an early-stage company strategy for acquiring customers.

I gave this talk remotely to Ubiquity.VC portfolio company founders and the Extended Team on June 26, 2019.


Title slide for this talk on Developer-Led Sales for Startups.
Information about the author, Matt Makai.

Hey folks, my name is Matt Makai. I serve the Developer Network at Twilio. I'm also part of the Extended Team at Ubiquity Ventures.

Section title slide for the dream of developer-led sales.

...

Developers at a hackathon working on code.

...

Code in a text editor.

...

Your revenue grows with their usage.

...

Early stage example dev-led sales companies.

...

Public and large private successful dev-led sales companies.

...

Subsection reality.

...

Developer relations skillset.

...

Developer relations is expensive.

...

Subsection for what is dev-led sales.

...

Developers are your first buyers.

...

Dev-led sales is not sales engineering or dev-only sales.

...

Empty map no developers using your product before launch.

...

Initial developer adoption upon launch.

...

Over time many more developers use your product.

...

When is dev-led sales worthwhile?

...

Solving a worthwhile developer problem.

...

How to explain your product to developers.

...

At an early stage you may not know your CAC and LTV but you should have a hypothesis for what they could be.

...

Bessemer's 10 Laws of Cloud Computing and developer platform laws are fantastic foundational reading.

...

Broad developer platform.

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Developers at tech conferences.

...

Developers at meetups.

...

Developers at hackathons.

...

Magical new approaches to developer relations.

...

Subsection title for recap.

...

Recap core ideas of talk.

...

Q&A slide.

That's all the slides for today so let's open it up for further questions. Again, my name is Matt Makai, I am a software developer at Twilio and the author of Full Stack Python.

26 Jun 2019 4:00am GMT

Full Stack Python: Developer-led Sales for Startups

This blog post contains the slides along with a loose transcript from my talk on the promises and perils of developer-led sales as an early-stage company strategy for acquiring customers.

I gave this talk remotely to Ubiquity.VC portfolio company founders and the Extended Team on June 26, 2019.


Title slide for this talk on Developer-Led Sales for Startups.
Information about the author, Matt Makai.

Hey folks, my name is Matt Makai. I serve the Developer Network at Twilio. I'm also part of the Extended Team at Ubiquity Ventures.

Section title slide for the dream of developer-led sales.

...

Developers at a hackathon working on code.

...

Code in a text editor.

...

Your revenue grows with their usage.

...

Early stage example dev-led sales companies.

...

Public and large private successful dev-led sales companies.

...

Subsection reality.

...

Developer relations skillset.

...

Developer relations is expensive.

...

Subsection for what is dev-led sales.

...

Developers are your first buyers.

...

Dev-led sales is not sales engineering or dev-only sales.

...

Empty map no developers using your product before launch.

...

Initial developer adoption upon launch.

...

Over time many more developers use your product.

...

When is dev-led sales worthwhile?

...

Solving a worthwhile developer problem.

...

How to explain your product to developers.

...

At an early stage you may not know your CAC and LTV but you should have a hypothesis for what they could be.

...

Bessemer's 10 Laws of Cloud Computing and developer platform laws are fantastic foundational reading.

...

Broad developer platform.

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Developers at tech conferences.

...

Developers at meetups.

...

Developers at hackathons.

...

Magical new approaches to developer relations.

...

Subsection title for recap.

...

Recap core ideas of talk.

...

Q&A slide.

That's all the slides for today so let's open it up for further questions. Again, my name is Matt Makai, I am a software developer at Twilio and the author of Full Stack Python.

26 Jun 2019 4:00am GMT

25 Jun 2019

feedPlanet Python

Python Engineering at Microsoft: Python in Visual Studio Code – June 2019 Release

We are pleased to announce that the June 2019 release of the Python Extension for Visual Studio Code is now available. You can download the Python extension from the Marketplace, or install it directly from the extension gallery in Visual Studio Code. If you already have the Python extension installed, you can also get the latest update by restarting Visual Studio Code. You can learn more about Python support in Visual Studio Code in the documentation.

In this release we made improvements that are listed in our changelog, closing a total of 70 issues including a plot viewer with the Python Interactive window, parallel tests with pytest, and indentation of run selection in the terminal.

Plot Viewer with the Python window

Plots are commonly used for data visualization. One of the top requested features for the Python Interactive window is to enable deeper inspection of the generated plots, e.g. zooming, panning, and exporting images. The June 2019 update included a brand-new Plot Viewer that can be used to manipulate any image plots, such as the popular matplotlib plots.

You can try it out by double-clicking on the plots or clicking on the "expand image" button that is displayed when you hover over plot images in the Python Interactive Window:

With the plot viewer, you can pan, zoom in/out, navigate through plots in the current session, and export plots to PDF, SVG, or PNG formats.

Parallel tests with pytest

We made enhancements to reliability of statistics displayed for tests run, in particular for running tests in parallel with pytest.

You can try out running tests in parallel with pytest by installing the pytest-xdist package and add "-n<number of CPUs>" to a configuration file. For example, for 4 CPUs you can create a pytest.ini file in the project folder and add the below content to it:

[pytest]
addopts=-n4

Now when you run and debug tests, they'll be executed in parallel.

You can refer to our documentation to learn more about testing support in the Python extension.

Indentation of run selection in the terminal

A highly requested VS Code Python feature on our GitHub repository was to dedent code selections before sending it to the terminal when running the "Run Selection/Line in Python Terminal" command. Starting in this release, the command will send to the terminal a de-indentation of the selection, based on its first non-empty line.

Other Changes and Enhancements

We have also added small enhancements and fixed issues requested by users that should improve your experience working with Python in Visual Studio Code. Some notable changes include:

Be sure to download the Python extension for Visual Studio Code now to try out the above improvements. If you run into any problems, please file an issue on the Python VS Code GitHub page.

The post Python in Visual Studio Code - June 2019 Release appeared first on Python.

25 Jun 2019 9:19pm GMT

Python Engineering at Microsoft: Python in Visual Studio Code – June 2019 Release

We are pleased to announce that the June 2019 release of the Python Extension for Visual Studio Code is now available. You can download the Python extension from the Marketplace, or install it directly from the extension gallery in Visual Studio Code. If you already have the Python extension installed, you can also get the latest update by restarting Visual Studio Code. You can learn more about Python support in Visual Studio Code in the documentation.

In this release we made improvements that are listed in our changelog, closing a total of 70 issues including a plot viewer with the Python Interactive window, parallel tests with pytest, and indentation of run selection in the terminal.

Plot Viewer with the Python window

Plots are commonly used for data visualization. One of the top requested features for the Python Interactive window is to enable deeper inspection of the generated plots, e.g. zooming, panning, and exporting images. The June 2019 update included a brand-new Plot Viewer that can be used to manipulate any image plots, such as the popular matplotlib plots.

You can try it out by double-clicking on the plots or clicking on the "expand image" button that is displayed when you hover over plot images in the Python Interactive Window:

With the plot viewer, you can pan, zoom in/out, navigate through plots in the current session, and export plots to PDF, SVG, or PNG formats.

Parallel tests with pytest

We made enhancements to reliability of statistics displayed for tests run, in particular for running tests in parallel with pytest.

You can try out running tests in parallel with pytest by installing the pytest-xdist package and add "-n<number of CPUs>" to a configuration file. For example, for 4 CPUs you can create a pytest.ini file in the project folder and add the below content to it:

[pytest]
addopts=-n4

Now when you run and debug tests, they'll be executed in parallel.

You can refer to our documentation to learn more about testing support in the Python extension.

Indentation of run selection in the terminal

A highly requested VS Code Python feature on our GitHub repository was to dedent code selections before sending it to the terminal when running the "Run Selection/Line in Python Terminal" command. Starting in this release, the command will send to the terminal a de-indentation of the selection, based on its first non-empty line.

Other Changes and Enhancements

We have also added small enhancements and fixed issues requested by users that should improve your experience working with Python in Visual Studio Code. Some notable changes include:

Be sure to download the Python extension for Visual Studio Code now to try out the above improvements. If you run into any problems, please file an issue on the Python VS Code GitHub page.

The post Python in Visual Studio Code - June 2019 Release appeared first on Python.

25 Jun 2019 9:19pm GMT

Continuum Analytics Blog: TensorFlow CPU optimizations in Anaconda

By Stan Seibert, Anaconda, Inc. & Nathan Greeneltch, Intel Corporation TensorFlow is one of the most commonly used frameworks for large-scale machine learning, especially deep learning (we'll call it "DL" for short). This popular framework…

The post TensorFlow CPU optimizations in Anaconda appeared first on Anaconda.

25 Jun 2019 8:54pm GMT

Continuum Analytics Blog: TensorFlow CPU optimizations in Anaconda

By Stan Seibert, Anaconda, Inc. & Nathan Greeneltch, Intel Corporation TensorFlow is one of the most commonly used frameworks for large-scale machine learning, especially deep learning (we'll call it "DL" for short). This popular framework…

The post TensorFlow CPU optimizations in Anaconda appeared first on Anaconda.

25 Jun 2019 8:54pm GMT

PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #374 (June 25, 2019)

#374 - JUNE 25, 2019
View in Browser »

The PyCoder’s Weekly Logo


How to Use Python Lambda Functions

In this step-by-step tutorial, you'll learn about Python lambda functions. You'll see how they compare with regular functions and how you can use them in accordance with best practices.
REAL PYTHON

How to Easily Use a Progress Bar in Python

A survey of Python progress bar libraries like Progress, ProgressBar2, TQDM, Click, and Clint that allow you to add animated progress bars to your command-line apps.
CODINGDOSE.INFO • Shared by Franccesco Orozco

Take the Hassle Out of Code Reviews-Codacy Flags Errors So You Can Fix Them Quickly

alt

Customize standards on coverage, duplication, complexity and style violations, and see results directly from your Git workflow. Use in the cloud or on private servers, free for open source projects & small teams →
CODACY sponsor

We Ported a Qt App From C++ to Python. Here's What Happened

"Our experience at ICS with Python and PyQt is that large complex (typically desktop) applications can be developed with Python. Users can't tell that it was implemented in Python and not C++. Performance is typically not an issue, and experienced Qt C++ developers can quickly make the transition to Python."
ICS.COM

Let's Build a Simple Interpreter With Python

Part 15 in Ruslan's ongoing series about building an interpreter from scratch, with Python.
RUSLAN SPIVAK

ARIMA Model: Complete Guide to Time Series Forecasting in Python

In this post, you'll build an optimal ARIMA model from scratch and extend it to Seasonal ARIMA (SARIMA) and SARIMAX models. You will also see how to build autoarima models in Python.
MACHINELEARNINGPLUS.COM

Introduction to Python for C/Java Programmers

A guide to Python written for an audience who is already familiar with languages such as C and Java.
GITHUB.COM/IVOAH

Generating Random Data in Python

In this course, you'll cover several options for generating random data in Python, and then build up to a comparison of each in terms of its level of security, versatility, purpose, and speed.
REAL PYTHON video

Building Standalone Python Applications With PyOxidizer

"PyOxidizer's marquee feature is that it can produce a single file executable containing a fully-featured Python interpreter, its extensions, standard library, and your application's modules and resources."
GREGORY SZORC

Discussions

Tips on How to Shorten the Run Time of a Large (> 1.5k Tests) Pytest Test Suite?

TWITTER.COM/NIKLASMM

What's Your Favorite Syntactic Sugar in Python?

REDDIT

What Framework/Hosting Does Your Python Blog Run On?

TWITTER.COM/WILDVASA

Guido: I stole Python's elif from the C Preprocessor

TWITTER.COM/GVANROSSUM

Python Jobs

Senior Backend Software Engineer (Remote)

Close

Lead Python Software Developer (Toronto, Canada)

Kognitiv

Data Engineer (Munich, Germany)

Stylight GmbH

Senior Python Developer (Malta, Europe)

Gaming Innovation Group

More Python Jobs >>>

Articles & Tutorials

Python's Mypy-Advanced Usage

"In my last article, I covered some basic uses for Mypy. Here, I want to expand upon those basics and show how Mypy really digs deeply into type definitions, allowing you to describe your code in a way that lets you be more confident of its stability."
REUVEN LERNER

Basic Input, Output, and String Formatting in Python

In this step-by-step Python tutorial, you'll learn how to take user input from the keyboard with the built-in function input(), how to display output to the console with the built-in function print(), and how to format string data with the string modulo operator.
REAL PYTHON

Build Python in Minutes With ActiveState

alt

Tired of Conda-installing? Automatically build your Python runtime environment with the packages you need: Automatically resolve dependencies, install in a virtual environment with a single command. Supports Python 2.7 and 3.6 on Linux and Windows. Build Now (Free Account) →
ACTIVESTATE sponsor

Parsing Nested JSON Records in Python

"For analyzing complex JSON data in Python, there aren't clear, general methods for extracting information […] This post provides a solution if one knows the path through the nested JSON to the desired information."
BRETT MULLINS

From Python to Go to Rust: An Opinionated Journey

"Go is cool but doesn't provide enough type safety for me. I would rather stick with Python and its ecosystem than risking re-writing stuff in Go if I don't need concurrency." Related discussion on Hacker News
ALLO-MEDIA.NET

Behind the Scenes at the Python Software Foundation

An interview about how the Python Software Foundation helps the language and community and how you can help them in their mission.
PYTHONPODCAST.COM podcast

Innovate Software at OSCON

Join us this July at the O'Reilly Open Source Software Conference (OSCON) to discover what's shaping software development and dive into the key technologies needed to build resilient, useful, innovative software. Save 25% with code PYCODER
O'REILLY sponsor

Clojure & Python, Side by Side (2011)

"As an exercise, I translated Peter Norvig's Sudoku solver from Python to Clojure."
JUSTIN KRAMER

10 Hacks to Speed Up Your Data Analysis in Python

PARUL PANDEY

Projects & Code

pytest-plugins: A Grab-Bag of Nifty Pytest Plugins

GITHUB.COM/MANAHL

Chemics: Python Package for Chemical Reactor Engineering

CHEMICS.GITHUB.IO • Shared by Gavin Wiggins

Real-Time-Voice-Cloning: Clone a Voice in 5 Seconds to Generate Arbitrary Speech in Real-Time

GITHUB.COM/CORENTINJ

PySimpleGUI: Python GUI Toolkit

GITHUB.COM/PYSIMPLEGUI

HTTP3: Next Generation HTTP Client for Python 3

ENCODE.IO

clojure-py: An Implementation of Clojure in Pure (Dynamic) Python

GITHUB.COM/DREWR

inline-python: Inline Python Code Directly in Your Rust Code

GITHUB.COM/FUSION-ENGINEERING

Events

Django Girls Abuja

June 28 to June 30, 2019
DJANGOGIRLS.ORG

PythOnRio Meetup

June 29, 2019
PYTHON.ORG.BR

PyDayNEA 2019

June 29 to June 30, 2019
PYTHON.ORG.AR

PyDay Pereira

June 29 to June 30, 2019
PYDAY.CO

Melbourne Python Users Group

July 1, 2019
J.MP

PiterPy Breakfast

July 3, 2019
TIMEPAD.RU

Reunión Python Valencia

July 4, 2019
GOOGLE.COM

Sydney Python User Group (SyPy)

July 4, 2019
SYPY.ORG

Dash Conference

July 16-17 in NYC
DASHCON.IO


Happy Pythoning!
This was PyCoder's Weekly Issue #374.
View in Browser »

alt


[ Subscribe to 🐍 PyCoder's Weekly 💌 - Get the best Python news, articles, and tutorials delivered to your inbox once a week >> Click here to learn more ]

25 Jun 2019 7:30pm GMT

PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #374 (June 25, 2019)

#374 - JUNE 25, 2019
View in Browser »

The PyCoder’s Weekly Logo


How to Use Python Lambda Functions

In this step-by-step tutorial, you'll learn about Python lambda functions. You'll see how they compare with regular functions and how you can use them in accordance with best practices.
REAL PYTHON

How to Easily Use a Progress Bar in Python

A survey of Python progress bar libraries like Progress, ProgressBar2, TQDM, Click, and Clint that allow you to add animated progress bars to your command-line apps.
CODINGDOSE.INFO • Shared by Franccesco Orozco

Take the Hassle Out of Code Reviews-Codacy Flags Errors So You Can Fix Them Quickly

alt

Customize standards on coverage, duplication, complexity and style violations, and see results directly from your Git workflow. Use in the cloud or on private servers, free for open source projects & small teams →
CODACY sponsor

We Ported a Qt App From C++ to Python. Here's What Happened

"Our experience at ICS with Python and PyQt is that large complex (typically desktop) applications can be developed with Python. Users can't tell that it was implemented in Python and not C++. Performance is typically not an issue, and experienced Qt C++ developers can quickly make the transition to Python."
ICS.COM

Let's Build a Simple Interpreter With Python

Part 15 in Ruslan's ongoing series about building an interpreter from scratch, with Python.
RUSLAN SPIVAK

ARIMA Model: Complete Guide to Time Series Forecasting in Python

In this post, you'll build an optimal ARIMA model from scratch and extend it to Seasonal ARIMA (SARIMA) and SARIMAX models. You will also see how to build autoarima models in Python.
MACHINELEARNINGPLUS.COM

Introduction to Python for C/Java Programmers

A guide to Python written for an audience who is already familiar with languages such as C and Java.
GITHUB.COM/IVOAH

Generating Random Data in Python

In this course, you'll cover several options for generating random data in Python, and then build up to a comparison of each in terms of its level of security, versatility, purpose, and speed.
REAL PYTHON video

Building Standalone Python Applications With PyOxidizer

"PyOxidizer's marquee feature is that it can produce a single file executable containing a fully-featured Python interpreter, its extensions, standard library, and your application's modules and resources."
GREGORY SZORC

Discussions

Tips on How to Shorten the Run Time of a Large (> 1.5k Tests) Pytest Test Suite?

TWITTER.COM/NIKLASMM

What's Your Favorite Syntactic Sugar in Python?

REDDIT

What Framework/Hosting Does Your Python Blog Run On?

TWITTER.COM/WILDVASA

Guido: I stole Python's elif from the C Preprocessor

TWITTER.COM/GVANROSSUM

Python Jobs

Senior Backend Software Engineer (Remote)

Close

Lead Python Software Developer (Toronto, Canada)

Kognitiv

Data Engineer (Munich, Germany)

Stylight GmbH

Senior Python Developer (Malta, Europe)

Gaming Innovation Group

More Python Jobs >>>

Articles & Tutorials

Python's Mypy-Advanced Usage

"In my last article, I covered some basic uses for Mypy. Here, I want to expand upon those basics and show how Mypy really digs deeply into type definitions, allowing you to describe your code in a way that lets you be more confident of its stability."
REUVEN LERNER

Basic Input, Output, and String Formatting in Python

In this step-by-step Python tutorial, you'll learn how to take user input from the keyboard with the built-in function input(), how to display output to the console with the built-in function print(), and how to format string data with the string modulo operator.
REAL PYTHON

Build Python in Minutes With ActiveState

alt

Tired of Conda-installing? Automatically build your Python runtime environment with the packages you need: Automatically resolve dependencies, install in a virtual environment with a single command. Supports Python 2.7 and 3.6 on Linux and Windows. Build Now (Free Account) →
ACTIVESTATE sponsor

Parsing Nested JSON Records in Python

"For analyzing complex JSON data in Python, there aren't clear, general methods for extracting information […] This post provides a solution if one knows the path through the nested JSON to the desired information."
BRETT MULLINS

From Python to Go to Rust: An Opinionated Journey

"Go is cool but doesn't provide enough type safety for me. I would rather stick with Python and its ecosystem than risking re-writing stuff in Go if I don't need concurrency." Related discussion on Hacker News
ALLO-MEDIA.NET

Behind the Scenes at the Python Software Foundation

An interview about how the Python Software Foundation helps the language and community and how you can help them in their mission.
PYTHONPODCAST.COM podcast

Innovate Software at OSCON

Join us this July at the O'Reilly Open Source Software Conference (OSCON) to discover what's shaping software development and dive into the key technologies needed to build resilient, useful, innovative software. Save 25% with code PYCODER
O'REILLY sponsor

Clojure & Python, Side by Side (2011)

"As an exercise, I translated Peter Norvig's Sudoku solver from Python to Clojure."
JUSTIN KRAMER

10 Hacks to Speed Up Your Data Analysis in Python

PARUL PANDEY

Projects & Code

pytest-plugins: A Grab-Bag of Nifty Pytest Plugins

GITHUB.COM/MANAHL

Chemics: Python Package for Chemical Reactor Engineering

CHEMICS.GITHUB.IO • Shared by Gavin Wiggins

Real-Time-Voice-Cloning: Clone a Voice in 5 Seconds to Generate Arbitrary Speech in Real-Time

GITHUB.COM/CORENTINJ

PySimpleGUI: Python GUI Toolkit

GITHUB.COM/PYSIMPLEGUI

HTTP3: Next Generation HTTP Client for Python 3

ENCODE.IO

clojure-py: An Implementation of Clojure in Pure (Dynamic) Python

GITHUB.COM/DREWR

inline-python: Inline Python Code Directly in Your Rust Code

GITHUB.COM/FUSION-ENGINEERING

Events

Django Girls Abuja

June 28 to June 30, 2019
DJANGOGIRLS.ORG

PythOnRio Meetup

June 29, 2019
PYTHON.ORG.BR

PyDayNEA 2019

June 29 to June 30, 2019
PYTHON.ORG.AR

PyDay Pereira

June 29 to June 30, 2019
PYDAY.CO

Melbourne Python Users Group

July 1, 2019
J.MP

PiterPy Breakfast

July 3, 2019
TIMEPAD.RU

Reunión Python Valencia

July 4, 2019
GOOGLE.COM

Sydney Python User Group (SyPy)

July 4, 2019
SYPY.ORG

Dash Conference

July 16-17 in NYC
DASHCON.IO


Happy Pythoning!
This was PyCoder's Weekly Issue #374.
View in Browser »

alt


[ Subscribe to 🐍 PyCoder's Weekly 💌 - Get the best Python news, articles, and tutorials delivered to your inbox once a week >> Click here to learn more ]

25 Jun 2019 7:30pm GMT

The No Title® Tech Blog: Book review – Python for Programmers, by Paul Deitel and Harvey Deitel

This is a book written while having in mind those who already have some object-oriented programming background but are willing to get into Python and (especially) Artificial Intelligence and Data Science.

25 Jun 2019 7:21pm GMT

The No Title® Tech Blog: Book review – Python for Programmers, by Paul Deitel and Harvey Deitel

This is a book written while having in mind those who already have some object-oriented programming background but are willing to get into Python and (especially) Artificial Intelligence and Data Science.

25 Jun 2019 7:21pm GMT

Continuum Analytics Blog: How We Made Conda Faster in 4.7

We've witnessed a lot of community grumbling about Conda's speed, and we've experienced it ourselves. Thanks to a contract from NASA via the SBIR program, we've been able to dedicate a lot of time recently…

The post How We Made Conda Faster in 4.7 appeared first on Anaconda.

25 Jun 2019 4:56pm GMT

Continuum Analytics Blog: How We Made Conda Faster in 4.7

We've witnessed a lot of community grumbling about Conda's speed, and we've experienced it ourselves. Thanks to a contract from NASA via the SBIR program, we've been able to dedicate a lot of time recently…

The post How We Made Conda Faster in 4.7 appeared first on Anaconda.

25 Jun 2019 4:56pm GMT

Real Python: Generating Random Data in Python

In this course, you'll cover several options for generating random data in Python, and then build up to a comparison of each in terms of its level of security, versatility, purpose, and speed.


[ Improve Your Python With 🐍 Python Tricks 💌 - Get a short & sweet Python Trick delivered to your inbox every couple of days. >> Click here to learn more and see examples ]

25 Jun 2019 2:00pm GMT

Real Python: Generating Random Data in Python

In this course, you'll cover several options for generating random data in Python, and then build up to a comparison of each in terms of its level of security, versatility, purpose, and speed.


[ Improve Your Python With 🐍 Python Tricks 💌 - Get a short & sweet Python Trick delivered to your inbox every couple of days. >> Click here to learn more and see examples ]

25 Jun 2019 2:00pm GMT

Reuven Lerner: Announcing: Python standard library, video explainer

A month or two ago, I saw an online quiz that caught my eye: How much of the Python standard library do you know?

Now, the "standard library" is the collection of modules and packages that come with Python. It constitutes the "batteries" that "batteries included" refers to in the Python world. And the standard library is big, with about 300 modules, each of which contains functions, classes, and values. Knowing the standard library, and how to use it, is essential to productive use of Python.

And yet, a large number of the people responding indicated that they knew very little of the standard library. Which makes sense, given that each of us tends to focus on what's important to our jobs.

Indeed, I've been using Python for a long time. And I had to admit that there are large parts of the standard library with which I'm totally unfamiliar. I'm sure that there are gems (no Ruby pun intended) in there that I could make use of in my work, if I only knew about them.

Image

I've thus decided to try an experiment, namely to walk through the entire standard library (or as much as I can physically, humanly do) in an open-ended YouTube video series. I've already uploaded a number of the videos, and I will be uploading a few new ones every week. I'm starting with the builtin types, walking through each of their methods - but I'll then proceed to the other and lesser-known modules.

This is all new content, certainly overlapping my previous writing and courses to some degree, but made new for this series. It's less formal than my courses, without any exercises or background theory connecting it all together. And yet, I've already learned about a number of methods and techniques - and I assume that the same will be true for you.

This video explainer is on YouTube, so you can watch it easily by subscribing to my channel there, at https://www.youtube.com/reuvenlerner. This is a long-term project, but one that I hope will be helpful and of use to you and to the entire Python community! Subscribe to my channel, and you'll get updated whenever I add new videos.

The post Announcing: Python standard library, video explainer appeared first on Reuven Lerner.

25 Jun 2019 9:30am GMT

Reuven Lerner: Announcing: Python standard library, video explainer

A month or two ago, I saw an online quiz that caught my eye: How much of the Python standard library do you know?

Now, the "standard library" is the collection of modules and packages that come with Python. It constitutes the "batteries" that "batteries included" refers to in the Python world. And the standard library is big, with about 300 modules, each of which contains functions, classes, and values. Knowing the standard library, and how to use it, is essential to productive use of Python.

And yet, a large number of the people responding indicated that they knew very little of the standard library. Which makes sense, given that each of us tends to focus on what's important to our jobs.

Indeed, I've been using Python for a long time. And I had to admit that there are large parts of the standard library with which I'm totally unfamiliar. I'm sure that there are gems (no Ruby pun intended) in there that I could make use of in my work, if I only knew about them.

Image

I've thus decided to try an experiment, namely to walk through the entire standard library (or as much as I can physically, humanly do) in an open-ended YouTube video series. I've already uploaded a number of the videos, and I will be uploading a few new ones every week. I'm starting with the builtin types, walking through each of their methods - but I'll then proceed to the other and lesser-known modules.

This is all new content, certainly overlapping my previous writing and courses to some degree, but made new for this series. It's less formal than my courses, without any exercises or background theory connecting it all together. And yet, I've already learned about a number of methods and techniques - and I assume that the same will be true for you.

This video explainer is on YouTube, so you can watch it easily by subscribing to my channel there, at https://www.youtube.com/reuvenlerner. This is a long-term project, but one that I hope will be helpful and of use to you and to the entire Python community! Subscribe to my channel, and you'll get updated whenever I add new videos.

The post Announcing: Python standard library, video explainer appeared first on Reuven Lerner.

25 Jun 2019 9:30am GMT

Talk Python to Me: #218 Serverless Python functions in Azure

Do you have stateless code that needs to run in the cloud? The clear answer years ago was to create and HTTP, or even, gasp! A SOAP service before then. While HTTP services are still very important, some of this code can move entirely away from the framework that runs it with serverless programming and hosted functions.

25 Jun 2019 8:00am GMT

Talk Python to Me: #218 Serverless Python functions in Azure

Do you have stateless code that needs to run in the cloud? The clear answer years ago was to create and HTTP, or even, gasp! A SOAP service before then. While HTTP services are still very important, some of this code can move entirely away from the framework that runs it with serverless programming and hosted functions.

25 Jun 2019 8:00am GMT

Python Bytes: #136 A Python kernel rather than cleaning the batteries?

25 Jun 2019 8:00am GMT

Python Bytes: #136 A Python kernel rather than cleaning the batteries?

25 Jun 2019 8:00am GMT

10 Nov 2011

feedPython Software Foundation | GSoC'11 Students

Benedict Stein: King Willams Town Bahnhof

Gestern musste ich morgens zur Station nach KWT um unsere Rerservierten Bustickets für die Weihnachtsferien in Capetown abzuholen. Der Bahnhof selber ist seit Dezember aus kostengründen ohne Zugverbindung - aber Translux und co - die langdistanzbusse haben dort ihre Büros.


Größere Kartenansicht




© benste CC NC SA

10 Nov 2011 10:57am GMT

09 Nov 2011

feedPython Software Foundation | GSoC'11 Students

Benedict Stein

Niemand ist besorgt um so was - mit dem Auto fährt man einfach durch, und in der City - nahe Gnobie- "ne das ist erst gefährlich wenn die Feuerwehr da ist" - 30min später auf dem Rückweg war die Feuerwehr da.




© benste CC NC SA

09 Nov 2011 8:25pm GMT

08 Nov 2011

feedPython Software Foundation | GSoC'11 Students

Benedict Stein: Brai Party

Brai = Grillabend o.ä.

Die möchte gern Techniker beim Flicken ihrer SpeakOn / Klinke Stecker Verzweigungen...

Die Damen "Mamas" der Siedlung bei der offiziellen Eröffnungsrede

Auch wenn weniger Leute da waren als erwartet, Laute Musik und viele Leute ...

Und natürlich ein Feuer mit echtem Holz zum Grillen.

© benste CC NC SA

08 Nov 2011 2:30pm GMT

07 Nov 2011

feedPython Software Foundation | GSoC'11 Students

Benedict Stein: Lumanyano Primary

One of our missions was bringing Katja's Linux Server back to her room. While doing that we saw her new decoration.

Björn, Simphiwe carried the PC to Katja's school


© benste CC NC SA

07 Nov 2011 2:00pm GMT

06 Nov 2011

feedPython Software Foundation | GSoC'11 Students

Benedict Stein: Nelisa Haircut

Today I went with Björn to Needs Camp to Visit Katja's guest family for a special Party. First of all we visited some friends of Nelisa - yeah the one I'm working with in Quigney - Katja's guest fathers sister - who did her a haircut.

African Women usually get their hair done by arranging extensions and not like Europeans just cutting some hair.

In between she looked like this...

And then she was done - looks amazing considering the amount of hair she had last week - doesn't it ?

© benste CC NC SA

06 Nov 2011 7:45pm GMT

05 Nov 2011

feedPython Software Foundation | GSoC'11 Students

Benedict Stein: Mein Samstag

Irgendwie viel mir heute auf das ich meine Blogposts mal ein bischen umstrukturieren muss - wenn ich immer nur von neuen Plätzen berichte, dann müsste ich ja eine Rundreise machen. Hier also mal ein paar Sachen aus meinem heutigen Alltag.

Erst einmal vorweg, Samstag zählt zumindest für uns Voluntäre zu den freien Tagen.

Dieses Wochenende sind nur Rommel und ich auf der Farm - Katja und Björn sind ja mittlerweile in ihren Einsatzstellen, und meine Mitbewohner Kyle und Jonathan sind zu Hause in Grahamstown - sowie auch Sipho der in Dimbaza wohnt.
Robin, die Frau von Rommel ist in Woodie Cape - schon seit Donnerstag um da ein paar Sachen zur erledigen.
Naja wie dem auch sei heute morgen haben wir uns erstmal ein gemeinsames Weetbix/Müsli Frühstück gegönnt und haben uns dann auf den Weg nach East London gemacht. 2 Sachen waren auf der Checkliste Vodacom, Ethienne (Imobilienmakler) außerdem auf dem Rückweg die fehlenden Dinge nach NeedsCamp bringen.

Nachdem wir gerade auf der Dirtroad losgefahren sind mussten wir feststellen das wir die Sachen für Needscamp und Ethienne nicht eingepackt hatten aber die Pumpe für die Wasserversorgung im Auto hatten.

Also sind wir in EastLondon ersteinmal nach Farmerama - nein nicht das onlinespiel farmville - sondern einen Laden mit ganz vielen Sachen für eine Farm - in Berea einem nördlichen Stadteil gefahren.

In Farmerama haben wir uns dann beraten lassen für einen Schnellverschluss der uns das leben mit der Pumpe leichter machen soll und außerdem eine leichtere Pumpe zur Reperatur gebracht, damit es nicht immer so ein großer Aufwand ist, wenn mal wieder das Wasser ausgegangen ist.

Fego Caffé ist in der Hemmingways Mall, dort mussten wir und PIN und PUK einer unserer Datensimcards geben lassen, da bei der PIN Abfrage leider ein zahlendreher unterlaufen ist. Naja auf jeden Fall speichern die Shops in Südafrika so sensible Daten wie eine PUK - die im Prinzip zugang zu einem gesperrten Phone verschafft.

Im Cafe hat Rommel dann ein paar online Transaktionen mit dem 3G Modem durchgeführt, welches ja jetzt wieder funktionierte - und übrigens mittlerweile in Ubuntu meinem Linuxsystem perfekt klappt.

Nebenbei bin ich nach 8ta gegangen um dort etwas über deren neue Deals zu erfahren, da wir in einigen von Hilltops Centern Internet anbieten wollen. Das Bild zeigt die Abdeckung UMTS in NeedsCamp Katjas Ort. 8ta ist ein neuer Telefonanbieter von Telkom, nachdem Vodafone sich Telkoms anteile an Vodacom gekauft hat müssen die komplett neu aufbauen.
Wir haben uns dazu entschieden mal eine kostenlose Prepaidkarte zu testen zu organisieren, denn wer weis wie genau die Karte oben ist ... Bevor man einen noch so billigen Deal für 24 Monate signed sollte man wissen obs geht.

Danach gings nach Checkers in Vincent, gesucht wurden zwei Hotplates für WoodyCape - R 129.00 eine - also ca. 12€ für eine zweigeteilte Kochplatte.
Wie man sieht im Hintergrund gibts schon Weihnachtsdeko - Anfang November und das in Südafrika bei sonnig warmen min- 25°C

Mittagessen haben wir uns bei einem Pakistanischen Curry Imbiss gegönnt - sehr empfehlenswert !
Naja und nachdem wir dann vor ner Stunde oder so zurück gekommen sind habe ich noch den Kühlschrank geputzt den ich heute morgen zum defrosten einfach nach draußen gestellt hatte. Jetzt ist der auch mal wieder sauber und ohne 3m dicke Eisschicht...

Morgen ... ja darüber werde ich gesondert berichten ... aber vermutlich erst am Montag, denn dann bin ich nochmal wieder in Quigney(East London) und habe kostenloses Internet.

© benste CC NC SA

05 Nov 2011 4:33pm GMT

31 Oct 2011

feedPython Software Foundation | GSoC'11 Students

Benedict Stein: Sterkspruit Computer Center

Sterkspruit is one of Hilltops Computer Centres in the far north of Eastern Cape. On the trip to J'burg we've used the opportunity to take a look at the centre.

Pupils in the big classroom


The Trainer


School in Countryside


Adult Class in the Afternoon


"Town"


© benste CC NC SA

31 Oct 2011 4:58pm GMT

Benedict Stein: Technical Issues

What are you doing in an internet cafe if your ADSL and Faxline has been discontinued before months end. Well my idea was sitting outside and eating some ice cream.
At least it's sunny and not as rainy as on the weekend.


© benste CC NC SA

31 Oct 2011 3:11pm GMT

30 Oct 2011

feedPython Software Foundation | GSoC'11 Students

Benedict Stein: Nellis Restaurant

For those who are traveling through Zastron - there is a very nice Restaurant which is serving delicious food at reasanable prices.
In addition they're selling home made juices jams and honey.




interior


home made specialities - the shop in the shop


the Bar


© benste CC NC SA

30 Oct 2011 4:47pm GMT

29 Oct 2011

feedPython Software Foundation | GSoC'11 Students

Benedict Stein: The way back from J'burg

Having the 10 - 12h trip from J'burg back to ELS I was able to take a lot of pcitures including these different roadsides

Plain Street


Orange River in its beginngings (near Lesotho)


Zastron Anglican Church


The Bridge in Between "Free State" and Eastern Cape next to Zastron


my new Background ;)


If you listen to GoogleMaps you'll end up traveling 50km of gravel road - as it was just renewed we didn't have that many problems and saved 1h compared to going the official way with all it's constructions sites




Freeway


getting dark


© benste CC NC SA

29 Oct 2011 4:23pm GMT

28 Oct 2011

feedPython Software Foundation | GSoC'11 Students

Benedict Stein: Wie funktioniert eigentlich eine Baustelle ?

Klar einiges mag anders sein, vieles aber gleich - aber ein in Deutschland täglich übliches Bild einer Straßenbaustelle - wie läuft das eigentlich in Südafrika ?

Ersteinmal vorweg - NEIN keine Ureinwohner die mit den Händen graben - auch wenn hier mehr Manpower genutzt wird - sind sie fleißig mit Technologie am arbeiten.

Eine ganz normale "Bundesstraße"


und wie sie erweitert wird


gaaaanz viele LKWs


denn hier wird eine Seite über einen langen Abschnitt komplett gesperrt, so das eine Ampelschaltung mit hier 45 Minuten Wartezeit entsteht


Aber wenigstens scheinen die ihren Spaß zu haben ;) - Wie auch wir denn gücklicher Weise mussten wir nie länger als 10 min. warten.

© benste CC NC SA

28 Oct 2011 4:20pm GMT