26 Mar 2017

feedPlanet Ubuntu

Nathan Haines: Winners of the Ubuntu 17.04 Free Culture Showcase

Spring is here and the release of Ubuntu 17.04 is just around the corner. I've been using it for two weeks and I can't say I'm disappointed! But one new feature that never disappoints me is appearance of the community wallpapers that were selected from the Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase!

Every cycle, talented artists around the world create media and release it under licenses that encourage sharing and adaptation. For Ubuntu 17.04, 96 images were submitted to the Ubuntu 17.04 Free Culture Showcase photo pool on Flickr, where all eligible submissions can be found.

But now the results are in, and the top choices, voted on by certain members of the Ubuntu community, and I'm proud to announce the winning images that will be included in Ubuntu 17.04:

A big congratulations to the winners, and thanks to everyone who submitted a wallpaper. You can find these wallpapers (along with dozens of other stunning wallpapers) today at the links above, or in your desktop wallpaper list after you upgrade or install Ubuntu 17.04 on April 13th.

26 Mar 2017 8:35am GMT

25 Mar 2017

feedPlanet Ubuntu

Simon Quigley: What I've Been Up To

It's been a long time since I've blogged about anything. I've been busy with lots of different things. Here's what I've been up to.

Lubuntu

First off, let's talk about Lubuntu. A couple different actions (or lack of) have happened.

Release Management

Walter Lapchynski recently passed on the position of Lubuntu Release Manager to me. He has been my mentor ever since I joined Ubuntu/Lubuntu in July of 2015, and I'm honored to be able to step up to this role.

Here's what I've done as Release Manager from then to today:

Sunsetted Lubuntu PowerPC daily builds for Lubuntu Zesty Zapus.

This was something we had been looking at for a while, and it just happened to happen immediately after I became Release Manager. It wasn't really our hand pushing this forward, per se. The Ubuntu Technical Board voted to end the PowerPC architecture in the Ubuntu archive for Zesty before this, and I thought it was a good time to carry this forward for Lubuntu.

Helped get Zesty Zapus Beta 1 out the door for Ubuntu and for Lubuntu as well.

Discussed Firefox and ALSA's future in Ubuntu.

When Firefox 52 was released into xenial-updates, it broke Firefox's sound functionality for Lubuntu 16.04 users, as Lubuntu 16.04 LTS uses ALSA, and despite what a certain Ubuntu site says, was because it was disabled in the default build of Firefox, not completely removed. I won't get into it (I don't want to start a flame war), but this wasn't really something Lubuntu messed up, as the original title (and content) of the article ("Lubuntu users are left with no sound after upgrading Firefox") implied.

I recently brought this up for discussion (I didn't know that part just mentioned when I sent the email linked above), and for the time being it will be re-enabled in the Ubuntu build. As we continue to update to future Firefox releases, this will result in bitrot, so eventually we need to switch off of Firefox in the future.

I'm personally against switching to Chromium, as it's not lightweight and it's a bit bloated. I have also recently started using Firefox, and it's been a lot faster for me than Chromium was. But, that's a discussion for another day, and within the next month, I will most likely bring it up for discussion on the lubuntu-devel mailing list. I'll probably write another blog post when I send that email, but we'll see.

Got Zesty Zapus Final Beta/Beta 2 out the door for Lubuntu.

LXQt

Lubuntu 17.04 will not ship with LXQt.

That's basically the bottom line here. ;)

I've been working to start a project on Launchpad that will allow me to upload packages to a PPA and have it build an image from that, but I'm still waiting to hear back on a few things for that.

You may be asking, "So why don't we have LXQt yet?" The answer to that question is, I've been busy with a new job, school, and many other things in life and haven't gotten the chance to heavily work on it much. I have a plan in mind, but it all depends on my free time from this point on.

That being said, if you want to get involved, please don't be afraid to send an email to the Lubuntu developers mailing list. We're all really friendly, and we'll be very willing to get you started, no matter your skill level. This is exactly the reason why LXQt is taking so long. It's because I'm pretty much the only one working on this specific subproject, and I don't have all the time in the world.

Donations

While this isn't specifically highlighting any work I've done in this area, I'd like to provide some information on this.

Lubuntu has been looking for a way to accept donations for a long time. Donations to Lubuntu would help fund:

A goal that I specifically have with this is to be transparent as possible about any donations we recieve and specifically where they go. But, we have to get it set up first.

While I am still a minor in the country I reside and (most likely) cannot make any legal decisions about funds (yet), Walter has been looking for a lawyer to help sort out something along the lines of a "Lubuntu Foundation" (or something like that) to manage the funds in a way that doesn't give only one person control. So if you know a lawyer (or are one) that would be willing to help us set that up, please contact me or Walter when you can.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

Before Issue 500 of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Elizabeth K. Joseph (Lyz) was in the driver's seat of the team. She helped get every release out on time every week without fail (with the exception of two-week issues, but that's irrelevant right now). Before I go on, I just want to say a big thank you to Lyz. Your contributions were really appreciated. :)

She had taken the time to show me not only how to write summaries in the very beginning, but how to edit, and even publish a whole issue. I'm very grateful for the time she spent with me, and I can't thank her enough.

Fast forward to 501, I ended up stepping up to get the email sent to summary writers and ultimately the whole issue published. I was nervous, as I had never published an issue on my own (Lyz and I had always split the tasks), but I successfully pressed the right buttons and got it out. Before publishing, I had some help from Paul White (his last issue contributing, thank you as well) and others to get summaries done and the issue edited.

Since then, I've pretty much stepped up to fill in the gaps for Lyz. I wouldn't necessarily consider anything official yet, but for now, this is where I'll stay.

But, it's tough to get issues of UWN out. I have a new respect for everything Lyz did and all of the hard work she put into each issue. This is a short description of what happens each week:

Wash, rinse, and repeat.

It's incredibly easy to write summaries. In fact, the email was just sent out earlier to summary writers. If you want to take a minute or two (that's all it takes for contributing a summary) to help us out, hop on to the Google Document, refer to the style guidelines linked at the top, and help us out. Then, when you're done, put your name on the bottom if you want to be credited. Every little bit helps!

Other things

About this website

For the future

So that's what I've been up to. :)

25 Mar 2017 1:27am GMT

24 Mar 2017

feedPlanet Ubuntu

Nish Aravamudan: [USD #1] Ubuntu Server Dev git Importer

This is the first in a series of posts about the Ubuntu Server Team's git importer (usd). There is a lot to discuss: why it's necessary, the algorithm, using the tooling for doing merges, using the tooling for contributing one-off fixes, etc. But for this post, I'm just going to give a quick overview of what's available and will follow-up in future posts with those details.

The importer was first announced here and then a second announcement was made here. But both those posts are pretty out-of-date now… I have written a relatively current guide to merging which does talk about the tooling here, and much of that content will be re-covered in future blog posts.

The tooling is browse-able here and can be obtained via

git clone https://git.launchpad.net/usd-importer

This will provide a usd command in the local repository's bin directory. That command resembles git as being the launching point for interacting with imported trees - both for importing them and for using them:

usage: usd [-h] [-P PARENTFILE] [-L PULLFILE]
 build|build-source|clone|import|merge|tag ...

Ubuntu Server Dev git tool

positional arguments:
 build|build-source|clone|import|merge|tag
 
 build - Build a usd-cloned tree with dpkg-buildpackage
 build-source - Build a source package and changes file
 clone - Clone package to a directory
 import - Update a launchpad git tree based upon the state of the Ubuntu and Debian archives
 merge - Given a usd-import'd tree, assist with an Ubuntu merge
 tag - Given a usd-import'd tree, tag a commit respecting DEP14

...

More information is available at https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuDevelopment/Merging/GitWorkflow.

You can run usd locally without arguments to view the full help.

Imported trees currently live here. This will probably change in the future as we work with the Launchpad team to integrate the functionality. As you can see, we have 411 repositories currently (as of this post) and that's a consequence of having the importer running automatically. Every 20 minutes or so, the usd-cron script checks if there are any new publishes of source packages listed in usd-cron-packages.txt in Debian or Ubuntu and runs usd import on them, if so.

I think that's enough for the first post! Just browsing the code and the imported trees is pretty interesting (running gitk on an imported repository gives you a very interesting visual of Ubuntu development). I'll dig into details in the next post (probably of many).


24 Mar 2017 11:40pm GMT

Nish Aravamudan: (USBSD #1: Goals) Inaugural Ubuntu Server Bug Squashing Day!

As posted on the ubuntu-server mailing list we had our first Ubuntu Server Bug Squashing Day (USBSD) on Wednesday, March 22, 2017. While we may not have had a large community showing, the event was still a success and their is momentum to make this a regular event going forward (more on that below…). This post is about the goals behind USBSD.

[Throughout the following I will probably refer to users by their IRC nicks. When I know their real names, I will try and use them as well at least once so real-person association is available.]

The intent of the USBSD is two-fold:

  1. The Server Team has a triage rotation for all bugs filed against packages in main, which is purely an attempt to provide adequate responses to 'important' - ensuring we have 'good' bug reports that are actionable and then to put them on to the Server Team's queue (via subscribing ~ubuntu-server). The goal for triage is not to solve the bugs, it's simply to respond and put it on the 'to-fix' list (which is visible here. But we don't want that list to just grow without bound (what good is it to respond to a bug but never fix it?), so we need to dedicate some time to working to get a bug to closure (or at least to the upload/sponsorship stage).
  2. Encourage community-driven ownership of bug-fixes and packages. While Robie Basak (rbasak), Christian Ehrhardt (cpaelzer), Josh Powers (powersj) and myself (nacc) all work for Canonical on the Server Team on the release side of things (meaning merges, bug-fixes, etc), there simply is not enough time in each cycle for the four of us alone to address every bug filed. And it's not to say that the only developers working on packages an Ubuntu Server user cares are us four. But from a coordination perspective for every package in main that is 'important' to Ubuntu Server, we are often at least involved. I do not want to diminish by any means any contribution to Ubuntu Server, but it does feel like the broader community contributions have slowed down with recent releases. That might be a good thing ™ in that packages don't have as many bugs, or it might just be that bugs are getting filed and no one is working on them. By improving our tooling and processes around bugs, we can lower barriers to entry for new contributors and ideally grow ownership and knowledge of packages relevant to Ubuntu Server.

That is a rather long-winded introduction to the goals. Did we meet them?

To the first point, it was a positive experience for those of us working on bugs on the day to have a dedicated place to coordinate and discuss solutions (on IRC at FreeNode/#ubuntu-server as well as well on the Etherpad we used [requires authentication and membership in the ~ubuntu-etherpad Launchpad team]. And I believe a handful of bugs were driven to completion.

To the second point, I was not pinged much at all (if at all) during the US business day on USBSD #1. That was a bit disappointing. But I saw that cpaelzer helped a few different users with several classes of bugs and that was awesome to wake up to! He also did a great job of documenting his bugwork/interactions on the Etherpad.

Follow-on posts will talk about ways we can improve and hopefully document some patterns for bugwork that we discover via USBSDs.

In the meanwhile, we're tentatively scheduling USBSD #2 for April 5, 2017!


24 Mar 2017 11:14pm GMT

Valorie Zimmerman: Laptop freezing -- figuring out the issues

Hi all, I have an awesome laptop I bought from my son, a hardcore gamer. So used, but also very beefy and well-cared-for. Lately, however, it has begun to freeze, by which I mean: the screen is not updated, and no keyboard inputs are accepted. So I can't even REISUB; the only cure is the power button.

I like to leave my laptop running overnight for a few reasons -- to get IRC posts while I sleep, to serve *ubuntu ISO torrents, and to run Folding@Home.

Attempting to cure the freezing, I've updated my graphics driver, rolled back to an older kernel, removed my beloved Folding@Home application, turned on the fan overnight, all to no avail. After adding lm-sensors and such, it didn't seem likely to be overheating, but I'd like to be sure about that.

Lately I turned off screen dimming at night and left a konsole window on the desktop running `top`. This morning I found a freeze again, with nothing apparent in the top readout:


So I went looking on the internet and found this super post: Using KSysGuard: System monitor tool for KDE. The first problem was that when I hit Control+Escape, I could not see the System Load tab he mentioned or any way to create a custom tab. However, when I started Ksysguard from the commandline, it matches the screenshots in the blog.

Here is my custom tab:


So tonight I'll leave that on my screen along with konsole running `top` and see if there is any more useful information.

24 Mar 2017 9:55pm GMT

Jono Bacon: My Move to ProsperWorks CRM and Feature Requests

As some of you will know, I am a consultant that helps companies build internal and external communities, collaborative workflow, and teams. Like any consultant, I have different leads that I need to manage, I convert those leads into opportunities, and then I need to follow up and convert them into clients.

Managing my time is one of the most critical elements of what I do. I want to maximize my time to be as valuable as possible, so optimizing this process is key. Thus, the choice of CRM has been an important one. I started with Insightly, but it lacked a key requirement: integration.

I hate duplicating effort. I spend the majority of my day living in email, so when a conversation kicks off as a lead or opportunity, I want to magically move that from my email to the CRM. I want to be able to see and associate conversations from my email in the CRM. I want to be able to see calendar events in my CRM. Most importantly, I don't want to be duplicating content from one place to another. Sure, it might not take much time, but the reality is that I am just going to end up not doing it.

Evaluations

So, I evaluated a few different platforms, with a strong bias to SalesforceIQ. The main attraction there was the tight integration with my email. The problem with SalesforceIQ is that it is expensive, it has limited integration beyond email, and it gets significantly more expensive when you want more control over your pipeline and reporting. SalesforceIQ has the notion of "lists" where each is kind of like a filtered spreadsheet view. For the basic plan you get one list, but beyond that you have to go up a plan in which I get more lists, but it also gets much more expensive.

As I courted different solutions I stumbled across ProsperWorks. I had never heard of it, but there were a number of features that I was attracted to.

ProsperWorks

Firstly, ProsperWorks really focuses on tight integration with Google services. Now, a big chunk of my business is using Google services. Prosperworks integrates with Gmail, but also Google Calendar, Google Docs, and other services.

They ship a Gmail plugin which makes it simple to click on a contact and add them to ProsperWorks. You can then create an opportunity from that contact with a single click. Again, this is from my email: this immediately offers an advantage to me.

ProsperWorks CRM

Yep, that's not my Inbox. It is an image yanked off the Internet.

When viewing each opportunity, ProsperWorks will then show associated Google Calendar events and I can easily attach Google Docs documents or other documents there too. The opportunity is presented as a timeline with email conversations listed there, but then integrated note-taking for meetings, and other elements. It makes it easy to summarize the scope of the deal, add the value, and add all related material. Also, adding additional parties to the deal is simple because ProsperWorks knows about your contacts as it sucks it up from your Gmail.

While the contact management piece is less important to me, it is also nice that it brings in related accounts for each contact automatically such as Twitter, LinkedIn, pictures, and more. Again, this all reduces the time I need to spend screwing around in a CRM.

Managing opportunities across the pipeline is simple too. I can define my own stages and then it basically operates like Trello and you just drag cards from one stage to another. I love this. No more selecting drop down boxes and having to save contacts. I like how ProsperWorks just gets out of my way and lets me focus on action.

…also not my pipeline view. Thanks again Google Images!

I also love that I can order these stages based on "inactivity". Because ProsperWorks integrates email into each opportunity, it knows how many inactive days there has been since I engaged with an opportunity. This means I can (a) sort my opportunities based on inactivity so I can keep on top of them easily, and (b) I can set reminders to add tasks when I need to follow up.

ProsperWorks CRM

The focus on inactivity is hugely helpful when managing lots of concurrent opportunities.

As I was evaluating ProsperWorks, there was one additional element that really clinched it for me: the design.

ProsperWorks looks and feels like a Google application. It uses material design, and it is sleek and modern. It doesn't just look good, but it is smartly designed in terms of user interaction. It is abundantly clear that whoever does the interaction and UX design at ProsperWorks is doing an awesome job, and I hope someone there cuts this paragraph out and shows it to them. If they do, you kick ass!

Of course, ProsperWorks does a load of other stuff that is helpful for teams, but I am primarily assessing this from a sole consultant's perspective. In the end, I pulled the trigger and subscribed, and I am delighted that I did. It provides a great service, is more cost efficient than the alternatives, provides an integrated solution, and the company looks like they are doing neat things.

Feature Requests

While I dig ProsperWorks, there are some things I would love to encourage the company to focus on. So, ProsperWorks folks, if you are reading this, I would love to see you focus on the following. If some of these already exist, let me know and I will update this post. Consider me a resource here: happy to talk to you about these ideas if it helps.

Wider Google Calendar integration

Currently the gcal integration is pretty neat. One limitation though is that it depends on a gmail.com domain. As such, calendar events where someone invites my jonobacon.com email doesn't automatically get added to the opportunity (and dashboard). It would be great to be able to associate another email address with an account (e.g. a gmail.com and jonobacon.com address) so when calendar events have either or both of those addresses they are sucked into opportunities. It would also be nice to select which calendars are viewed: I use different calendars for different things (e.g. one calendar for booked work, one for prospect meetings, one for personal etc). Feature Request Link

It would also be great to have ProsperWorks be able to ease scheduling calendar meetings in available slots. I want to be able to talk to a client about scheduling a call, click a button in the opportunity, and ProsperWorks will tell me four different options for call times, I can select which ones I am interested in, and then offer these times to the client, where they can pick one. ProsperWorks knows my calendar, this should be doable, and would be hugely helpful. Feature Request Link

Improve the project management capabilities

I have a dream. I want my CRM to also offer simple project management capabilities. ProsperWorks does have a 'projects' view, but I am unclear on the point of it.

What I would love to see is simple project tracking which integrates (a) the ability to set milestones with deadlines and key deliverables, and (b) Objective Key Results. This would be huge: I could agree on a set of work complete with deliverables as part of an opportunity, and then with a single click be able to turn this into a project where the milestones would be added and I could assign tasks, track notes, and even display a burndown chart to see how on track I am within a project. Feature Request Link

This doesn't need to be a huge project management system, just a simple way of adding milestones, their child tasks, tracking deliverables, and managing work that leads up to those deliverables. Even if ProsperWorks just adds simple Evernote functionality where I can attach a bunch of notes to a client, this would be hugely helpful.

Optimize or Integrate Task Tracking

Tracking tasks is an important part of my work. The gold standard for task tracking is Wunderlist. It makes it simple to add tasks (not all tasks need deadlines), and I can access them from anywhere.

I would love to ProsperWorks to either offer that simplicity of task tracking (hit a key, whack in a title for a task, and optionally add a deadline instead of picking an arbitrary deadline that it nags me about later), or integrate with Wunderlist directly. Feature Request Link

Dashboard Configurability

I want my CRM dashboard to be something I look at every day. I want it to tell me what calendar events I have today, which opportunities I need to follow up with, what tasks I need to complete, and how my overall pipeline is doing. ProspectWorks does some of this, but doesn't allow me to configure this view. For example, I can't get rid of the 'Invite Team Members' box, which is entirely irrelevant to me as an individual consultant. Feature Request Link

So, all in all, nice work, ProsperWorks! I love what you are doing, and I love how you are innovating in this space. Consider me a resource: I want to see you succeed!

UPDATE: Updated with feature request links.

The post My Move to ProsperWorks CRM and Feature Requests appeared first on Jono Bacon.

24 Mar 2017 5:13pm GMT

Costales: New (lovely) uNav for Ubuntu Phone

After a few improvements in uNav I'm so proud of the current version, specially with the last useful feature.

But an image will explain it better. You'll choose your transport mode and the orange line is the public transport :))

New uNav 0.67

Enjoy the freedom in your Ubuntu Phone or tablet!

24 Mar 2017 3:03pm GMT

Luis de Bethencourt: C++ Cheat Sheet

I spend most of my time writing and reading C code, but every once in a while I get to play with a C++ project and find myself doing frequent reference checks to cppreference.com. I wrote myself the most concise cheat sheet I could that still shaved off the majority of those quick checks. Maybe it helps other fellow programmers who occasionally dabble with C++.

class ClassName {
  int priv_member;  // private by default
protected:
  int protect_member;
public:
  ClassName() // constructor
  int get_priv_mem();  // just prototype of func
  virtual ~ClassName() {} // destructor
};

int ClassName::get_priv_mem() {  // define via scope
  return priv_member;
}

class ChildName : public ClassName, public CanDoMult {
public:
  ChildName() {
    protect_member = 0;
  } ...
};

class Square {
  friend class Rectangle; ... // can access private members
};


Containers: container_type<int>
 list -> linked list
  front(), back(), begin(), end(), {push/pop}_{front/back}(), insert(), erase()
 deque ->double ended queue
  [], {push/pop}_{front/back}(), insert(), erase(), front(), back(), begin()
 queue/stack -> adaptors over deque
  push(), pop(), size(), empty()
  front(), back() <- queue
  top() <- stack
 unordered_map -> hashtable
  [], at(), begin(), end(), insert(), erase(), count(), empty(), size()
 vector -> dynamic array
  [], at(), front(), back(), {push/pop}_back, insert(), erase(), size()
 map -> tree
  [], at(), insert(), erase(), begin(), end(), size(), empty(), find(), count()

 unordered_set -> hashtable just keys
 set -> tree just keys

24 Mar 2017 1:18pm GMT

Lubuntu Blog: Lubuntu Zesty Zapus Final Beta has been released!

Lubuntu Zesty Zapus Final Beta (soon to be 17.04) has been released! We have a couple papercuts listed in the release notes, so please take a look. A big thanks to the whole Lubuntu team and contributors for helping pull this release together. You can grab the images from here: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/zesty/beta-2/

24 Mar 2017 3:16am GMT

The Fridge: Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Final Beta released

The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the final beta release of the Ubuntu 17.04 Desktop, Server, and Cloud products.

Codenamed "Zesty Zapus", 17.04 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

This beta release includes images from not only the Ubuntu Desktop, Server, and Cloud products, but also the Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu flavours.

We're also pleased with this release to welcome Ubuntu Budgie to the family of Ubuntu community flavours.

The beta images are known to be reasonably free of showstopper CD build or installer bugs, while representing a very recent snapshot of 17.04 that should be representative of the features intended to ship with the final release expected on April 13th, 2017.

Ubuntu, Ubuntu Server, Cloud Images

Yakkety Final Beta includes updated versions of most of our core set of packages, including a current 4.10 kernel, and much more.

To upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta from Ubuntu 16.10, follow these instructions:

The Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

Additional images can be found at the following links:

As fixes will be included in new images between now and release, any daily cloud image from today or later (i.e. a serial of 20170323 or higher) should be considered a beta image. Bugs found should be filed against the appropriate packages or, failing that, the cloud-images project in Launchpad.

The full release notes for Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta can be found at:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ZestyZapus/ReleaseNotes

Kubuntu

Kubuntu is the KDE based flavour of Ubuntu. It uses the Plasma desktop and includes a wide selection of tools from the KDE project.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

More information on Kubuntu Final Beta can be found here:

Lubuntu

Lubuntu is a flavor of Ubuntu that targets to be lighter, less resource hungry and more energy-efficient by using lightweight applications and LXDE, The Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment, as its default GUI.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

More information on Lubuntu Final Beta can be found here:

Ubuntu Budgie

Ubuntu Budgie is community developed desktop, integrating Budgie Desktop Environment with Ubuntu at its core.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

More information on Ubuntu Budgie Final Beta can be found here:

Ubuntu GNOME

Ubuntu GNOME is a flavor of Ubuntu featuring the GNOME desktop environment.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

More information on Ubuntu GNOME Final Beta can be found here:

UbuntuKylin

UbuntuKylin is a flavor of Ubuntu that is more suitable for Chinese users.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

More information on UbuntuKylin Final Beta can be found here:

Ubuntu MATE

Ubuntu MATE is a flavor of Ubuntu featuring the MATE desktop environment.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

More information on UbuntuMATE Final Beta can be found here:

Ubuntu Studio

Ubuntu Studio is a flavor of Ubuntu that provides a full range of multimedia content creation applications for each key workflows: audio, graphics, video, photography and publishing.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

More information about Ubuntu Studio Final Beta can be found here:

Xubuntu

Xubuntu is a flavor of Ubuntu that comes with Xfce, which is a stable, light and configurable desktop environment.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

More inormation about Xubuntu Final Beta can be found here:

Regular daily images for Ubuntu, and all flavours, can be found at:

Ubuntu is a full-featured Linux distribution for clients, servers and clouds, with a fast and easy installation and regular releases. A tightly-integrated selection of excellent applications is included, and an incredible variety of add-on software is just a few clicks away.

Professional technical support is available from Canonical Limited and hundreds of other companies around the world. For more information about support, visit http://www.ubuntu.com/support

If you would like to help shape Ubuntu, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at: http://www.ubuntu.com/community/participate

Your comments, bug reports, patches and suggestions really help us to improve this and future releases of Ubuntu. Instructions can be found at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ReportingBugs

You can find out more about Ubuntu and about this beta release on our website, IRC channel and wiki.

To sign up for future Ubuntu announcements, please subscribe to Ubuntu's very low volume announcement list at:

Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Thu Mar 23 22:00:58 UTC 2017 by Adam Conrad on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team

24 Mar 2017 2:32am GMT

Kubuntu General News: Kubuntu 17.04 Beta 2 released for testers

Today the Kubuntu team is happy to announce that Kubuntu Zesty Zapus (17.04) Beta 2 is released . With this Beta 2 pre-release, you can see and test what we are preparing for 17.04, which we will be releasing April 13, 2017.

Kubuntu 17.04 Beta 2

NOTE: This is Beta 2 Release. Kubuntu Beta Releases are NOT recommended for:

* Regular users who are not aware of pre-release issues
* Anyone who needs a stable system
* Anyone uncomfortable running a possibly frequently broken system
* Anyone in a production environment with data or work-flows that need to be reliable

Getting Kubuntu 17.04 Beta 2:
* Upgrade from 16.10: run `do-release-upgrade -d` from a command line.
* Download a bootable image (ISO) and put it onto a DVD or USB Drive : http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/releases/zesty/beta-2/

Release notes: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ZestyZapus/Beta2/Kubuntu

24 Mar 2017 12:08am GMT

23 Mar 2017

feedPlanet Ubuntu

Jono Bacon: Community Leadership Summit 2017: 6th – 7th May in Austin

The Community Leadership Summit is taking place on the 6th - 7th May 2017 in Austin, USA.

The event brings together community managers and leaders, projects, and initiatives to share and learn how we build strong, engaging, and productive communities. The event takes place the weekend before OSCON in the same venue, the Austin Contention Center. It is entirely FREE to attend and welcomes everyone, whether you are a community veteran or just starting out your journey!

The event is broken into three key components.

Firstly, we have an awesome set of keynotes this year:

Secondly, the bulk of the event is an unconference where the attendees volunteer session ideas and run them. Each session is a discussion where the topic is discussed, debated, and we reach final conclusions. This results in a hugely diverse range of sessions covering topics such as event management, outreach, social media, governance, collaboration, diversity, building contributor programs, and more. These discussions are incredible for exploring and learning new ideas, meeting interesting people, building a network, and developing friendships.

Finally, we have social events on both evenings where you can meet and network with other attendees. Food and drinks are provided by data.world and Mattermost. Thanks to both for their awesome support!

Join Us

The Community Leadership Summit is entirely FREE to attend. If you would like to join, we would appreciate if you could register (this helps us with expected numbers). I look forward to seeing you there in Austin on the 6th - 7th May 2017!

The post Community Leadership Summit 2017: 6th - 7th May in Austin appeared first on Jono Bacon.

23 Mar 2017 4:40pm GMT

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S10E03 – Aloof Puny Wren - Ubuntu Podcast

We discuss website owners filing bugs with Mozilla, GitLab acquiring Gitter, Moodle remote code execution, Windows 10 adverts, KDE Slimbook, 32-bit PowerPC EOL in Ubuntu, a new Vala release and the merger of Sonar GNU/Linux and Vinux.

It's Season Ten Episode Three of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week's show:

That's all for this week! If there's a topic you'd like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to show@ubuntupodcast.org or Tweet us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our Google+ page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

23 Mar 2017 3:00pm GMT

Ubuntu Insights: Huawei and Canonical Integrate OpenStack and CloudFabric


Huawei Extends its Cooperation with Canonical with the Integration of CloudFabric Data Center Network Solution and Ubuntu Cloud Solutions

Hannover, Germany, March 23, 2017 - Huawei and Canonical today announced they are expanding their cooperation in enterprise and telecom clouds to announce that they have completed the integration of CloudFabric Cloud Data Center Network Solution and Canonical's Ubuntu OpenStack. The joint solution integrates the Agile Controller, Huawei's SDN controller, with Ubuntu OpenStack to improve the efficiency of deploying and maintaining multiple data center networks. A large number of controller nodes can be deployed in minutes to interoperate with the cloud platform quickly. Enterprises or telecom cloud platforms that are using or plan to use Ubuntu OpenStack platform can directly connect their OpenStack platform with the Agile Controller to enable quick, flexible service deployment and integration in multiple data centers.

Canonical's OpenStack Interoperability Lab in Boston builds more than 3000 OpenStack clouds every month to test and verify the interoperability of different hardware, SDN and software combinations, helping customers to integrate and deploy their cloud platforms and SDN solutions in a secure environment. This new joint initiative between Huawei and Canonical includes the integration of Huawei Agile Controller with Juju, Canonical's service modelling tool, that provides the ability to quickly deploy complex workloads including OpenStack with various SDN controllers. The combination of Huawei Agile Controller and Ubuntu OpenStack with Juju tooling enables the rapid efficient scaling and operation of complex application services while minimizing the need for manual intervention.

"We are honored to expand our strategic relationship with Huawei. Ubuntu OpenStack and Juju integration with the Huawei Agile Controller enhances customer data center management capability, especially when it comes to operating large-scale data center deployments easily. Our collaboration with Huawei delivers even simpler and more efficient automated data center solutions to our customers," said John Zannos, Vice President of Cloud Alliances and Ecosystem at Canonical.

Huang He, General Manager of the Huawei SDN Controller Domain, said: "Openness is a key factor of a data center network solution. Huawei Agile Controller has passed interoperability certification with multiple providers of commercial OpenStack versions. The successful integration with Canonical reflects the deepened cooperation with cloud platform providers. This joint solution achieved not only automated network device configuration and service orchestration, but also the quick installation and deployment of the controller system itself. This further improves the data center operation efficiency."

By cooperating with Canonical, Huawei makes another step toward an all-cloud network management ecosystem. Huawei is continuing the effort promoting commercial SDN deployments and creating an open, cooperative, win-win SDN ecosystem. The alliance of Huawei and Canonical benefits enterprise and telecom users by improving the network management efficiency and is a significant to the development of the entire ecosystem.

For further information please contact pr@canonical.com

23 Mar 2017 2:18pm GMT

Ubuntu Insights: Out of date software leaves you vulnerable

Two weeks ago, Der Spiegel wrote an article highlighting that out of date software on private clouds was leaving government and political party information vulnerable to being hacked. Given that political organisations being targeted is currently such a hot topic, it is somewhat of a surprise how widespread this issue appears to be. After discovering the size and scope of the problem through their own investigations, Nextcloud decided to take a proactive approach and help organisations' awareness and address potential vulnerabilities.

The large number of insecure servers came to light as a result of a tool that Nextcloud was developing. Given their findings, Nextcloud took the somewhat unusual industry step to proactively work with Computer Emergency Response Teams in various countries to notify affected people of the risks, in an effort to help keep their data as secure as possible.

The Der Spiegel article and Nextcloud's response which chose transparency over secrecy and following security best practices are a must read for everyone in the industry and a timely reminder to us all of the importance of updating our software on a regular basis.

As mentioned in NextCloud's blog response, they have now released the Nextcloud Private Cloud Security Scanner as a quick and simple tool to enable users to regularly check their servers and ensure always up to date software. However the ideal scenario is for software updates to happen automatically and reduce the risk of a security threat as a result, especially so for smaller organisations and consumers, which often lack the technical know-how to maintain their system up to date . This is a feature that's built into snaps, the universal Linux application packaging format, which is why Nextcloud uses snaps to distribute their software as part of their Nextcloud Box offering. Users of the box will get automated updates of their Nextcloud software whenever a new release is made available in the store. As a matter of fact the NextCloud Box is built on Ubuntu core, the version of Ubuntu entirely built out of snaps. This means that the entire software on the box is seamlessly updated without administrator involvement, and it literally takes no effort to keep your storage secure.

23 Mar 2017 10:55am GMT

Ted Gould: Applications under systemd

When we started to look at how to confine applications enough to allow an appstore that allows for anyone to upload applications we knew that Apparmor could do the filesystem and IPC restrictions, but we needed something to manage the processes. There are kernel features that work well for this, but we didn't want to reinvent the management of them, and we realized that Upstart already did this for other services in the system. That drove us to decide to use Upstart for managing application processes as well. In order to have a higher level management and abstraction interface we started a small library called upstart-app-launch and we were off. Times change and so do init daemons, so we renamed the project ubuntu-app-launch expecting to move it to systemd eventually.

Now we've finally fully realized that transition and ubuntu-app-launch runs all applications and untrusted helpers as systemd services.

bye, bye, Upstart. Photo from: https://pixabay.com/en/goodbye-waving-boy-river-boat-705165/

For the most part, no one should notice anything different. Applications will start and stop in the same way. Even users of ubuntu-app-launch shouldn't notice a large difference in how the library works. But for people tinkering with the system they will notice a few things. Probably the most obvious is that application log files are no longer in ~/.cache/upstart. Now the log files for applications are managed by journald, which as we get all the desktop services ported to use systemd, will mean that you can see integrated events from multiple processes. So if Unity8 is rejecting your connection you'll be able to see that next to the error from your application. This should make debugging your applications easier. You'll also be able to redirect messages off a device realtime, which will help debugging your application on a phone or tablet.

For those who are more interested in details we're using systemd's transient unit feature. This allows us to create the unit on the fly with multiple instances of each application. Under Upstart we used a job with instances for each application, but now that we're taking on more typical desktop style applications we needed to be able to support multi-instance applications, which would have been hard to manage with that approach. We're generating the service name using this pattern:

ubuntu-app-launch--$(application type)--$(application id)--$(time stamp).service

The time stamp is used to make a unique name for applications that are multi-instance. For applications that ask us to maintain a single instance for them the time stamp is not included.

Hopefully that's enough information to get you started playing around with applications running under systemd. And if you don't care to, you shouldn't even notice this transition.

23 Mar 2017 5:00am GMT