05 Feb 2016

feedOfficial Google Blog

From antiques to pizza, see what went into making this year’s masterpieces for Doodle 4 Google

Last October, we kicked off our annual Doodle 4 Google art competition, asking students to create a doodle to tell the world "What makes me…me." This time around, we added a little twist: for the first time in eight years of Doodle 4 Google, there were no restrictions on the medium or materials kids could use to create a doodle. Kids took us up on the challenge. A quarter of all finalists used some non-traditional media-from clay and wood to origami, photographs and sheets of music-in their submission.

Today, Googlers are hosting surprise assemblies at schools from Waterville, Maine to Waipahu, Hawaii to celebrate the winners of each state and thank the teachers and parents who have encouraged them along the way. And for the first time ever, we're announcing winners for Washington, D.C., Guam and Puerto Rico. See all 53 State and Territory Winners on our website.



Now, our finalists need your votes for a shot at having their doodle make it onto the Google homepage. Starting today through Feb 22, head to the Doodle 4 Google site to vote for your favorite artwork for each grade group. On March 21, we'll announce the winner and four runners-up-and you'll see the winning doodle on google.com.

Check out this year's talented set of finalists and vote for your favorite!


Posted by Ryan Germick, Doodler and non-traditional media enthusiast https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-n1T7wJ8BU3s/VrQuNJBNVeI/AAAAAAAAR0k/uecYY5zg3LQ/s1600/D4G.gif" Ryan Germick Doodler AUTHOR TEAM

05 Feb 2016 2:00pm GMT

03 Feb 2016

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Thanks, Amit

Amit Singhal just announced that he's retiring toward the end of the month. Amit has been a formative part of Google's search team, but he's also a good friend. Last year, after he marked 15 years with Google, I wrote this about Amit's contributions: Amit Singhal, one of the unsung heroes of Google, just celebrated […]

03 Feb 2016 7:49pm GMT

01 Feb 2016

feedOfficial Google Blog

Preserving and celebrating Black history, arts and culture

Growing up, my parents were daily reminders of the sacrifices made by earlier generations of Black Americans to give people like me the opportunities they were denied. To this day, their stories propel me to continue the fight for justice. I am far from alone-reflecting on a shared history inspires millions around the world to work toward equality. But without some record, those stories and the passion they ignite could get lost.

Artworks, artifacts and archives have the power not only to give a story life, but to encourage action and incite change. That's why the Google Cultural Institute is excited to add records from institutions like the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Studio Museum and Amistad Research Center and many more-bringing together important archives from Black history for anyone to access not only during Black History Month, but throughout the year.

From the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra to the historical records of Frederick Douglass and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., this collection includes 26 new institutions (50 overall) contributing 5,000+ items and more than 80 curated exhibits. It includes new Street View imagery and three Google Expeditions, including an exploration of the resurgence of Jazz in New Orleans with Irvin Mayfield and Soledad O'Brien. You can see a 360 degree YouTube video made in conjunction with that Expedition here:

In The Baltimore Museum of Art's exhibition "Questioning the Canon," you can see Mickalene Thomas's Le déjeuner sur l'herbe: Les Trois Femmes Noires and compare it side-by-side with the Manet original to see the ways Thomas has subverted the subject-matter of this canonical white European work.

You can trace along the paths of history by reading Frederick Douglass' letter to his former master, and read the original manuscripts of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" and "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speeches. Absorb Dr. King's personal letter to wife Coretta Scott King at the beginning of his four-month prison term for non-violent protest, then cut to photographs documenting his momentous first handshake at the White House with President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Collecting these works into one place provides unprecedented access to a vital part of history that is too often forgotten. By comparing works of art and texts of speeches to find commonalities and distinctions, we can also build on the past to inspire ourselves and others. And while today is the first day of Black History Month, the work of remembering our history is necessary year round-which is why these records will be there on the Cultural Institute for generations to come.

Posted by Valeisha Butterfield Jones, Head of Black Community Engagement http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-GQmKUucIo2M/Vq7wbvb29_I/AAAAAAAAR0I/tC4JD65XndA/s1600/Screenshot%2B2016-01-29%2Bat%2B4.02.49%2BPM.png Valeisha Butterfield Jones Head of Black Community Engagement AUTHOR TEAM

01 Feb 2016 4:24pm GMT

27 Jan 2016

feedOfficial Google Blog

(Un)folding a virtual journey with Google Cardboard

A year and a half ago we introduced Google Cardboard, a simple cardboard viewer that anyone can use to experience mobile virtual reality (VR). With just Cardboard and the smartphone in your pocket, you can travel to faraway places and visit imagined worlds. Since then everyone from droid lovers and Sunday edition subscribers, to big kids and grandmas have been able to enjoy VR-often for the very first time. Here's a look at where we are, 19 months in:

1. 5 million Cardboard fans have joined the fold.


2. In just the past two months (October-December), you launched into 10 million more immersive app experiences:


3. Out of 1,000+ Cardboard apps on Google Play, one of your favorites got you screaming "aaaaaaahwsome," while another "gave you goosebumps."


4. You teleported to places far and wide, right from the comfort of YouTube.


5. Since we launched Cardboard Camera in December, you've captured more than 750,000 VR photos, letting you relive your favorite moments anytime, from anywhere.


6. Students around the world have taken VR field trips to the White House, the Republic of Congo, and 150 other places around the globe with Expeditions.


While you've been traveling the world and beyond with Cardboard, we've been on a journey, too. Keep your eyes peeled for more projects that bring creative, entertaining and educational experiences to mobile VR.

Posted by Clay Bavor, VP Virtual Reality http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-2lf4cAt9Xoo/VqkFrHZ5xxI/AAAAAAAARzs/E8ZK8l4EPo8/s1600/Google-Cardboard_hero.jpg Clay Bavor VP Virtual Reality

27 Jan 2016 6:15pm GMT

AlphaGo: using machine learning to master the ancient game of Go

The game of Go originated in China more than 2,500 years ago. Confucius wrote about the game, and it is considered one of the four essential arts required of any true Chinese scholar. Played by more than 40 million people worldwide, the rules of the game are simple: Players take turns to place black or white stones on a board, trying to capture the opponent's stones or surround empty space to make points of territory. The game is played primarily through intuition and feel, and because of its beauty, subtlety and intellectual depth it has captured the human imagination for centuries.

But as simple as the rules are, Go is a game of profound complexity. There are 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 possible positions-that's more than the number of atoms in the universe, and more than a googol times larger than chess.

This complexity is what makes Go hard for computers to play, and therefore an irresistible challenge to artificial intelligence (AI) researchers, who use games as a testing ground to invent smart, flexible algorithms that can tackle problems, sometimes in ways similar to humans. The first game mastered by a computer was noughts and crosses (also known as tic-tac-toe) in 1952. Then fell checkers in 1994. In 1997 Deep Blue famously beat Garry Kasparov at chess. It's not limited to board games either-IBM's Watson [PDF] bested two champions at Jeopardy in 2011, and in 2014 our own algorithms learned to play dozens of Atari games just from the raw pixel inputs. But to date, Go has thwarted AI researchers; computers still only play Go as well as amateurs.

Traditional AI methods-which construct a search tree over all possible positions-don't have a chance in Go. So when we set out to crack Go, we took a different approach. We built a system, AlphaGo, that combines an advanced tree search with deep neural networks. These neural networks take a description of the Go board as an input and process it through 12 different network layers containing millions of neuron-like connections. One neural network, the "policy network," selects the next move to play. The other neural network, the "value network," predicts the winner of the game.

We trained the neural networks on 30 million moves from games played by human experts, until it could predict the human move 57 percent of the time (the previous record before AlphaGo was 44 percent). But our goal is to beat the best human players, not just mimic them. To do this, AlphaGo learned to discover new strategies for itself, by playing thousands of games between its neural networks, and adjusting the connections using a trial-and-error process known as reinforcement learning. Of course, all of this requires a huge amount of computing power, so we made extensive use of Google Cloud Platform.

After all that training it was time to put AlphaGo to the test. First, we held a tournament between AlphaGo and the other top programs at the forefront of computer Go. AlphaGo won all but one of its 500 games against these programs. So the next step was to invite the reigning three-time European Go champion Fan Hui-an elite professional player who has devoted his life to Go since the age of 12-to our London office for a challenge match. In a closed-doors match last October, AlphaGo won by 5 games to 0. It was the first time a computer program has ever beaten a professional Go player. You can find out more in our paper, which was published in Nature today.

What's next? In March, AlphaGo will face its ultimate challenge: a five-game challenge match in Seoul against the legendary Lee Sedol-the top Go player in the world over the past decade.

We are thrilled to have mastered Go and thus achieved one of the grand challenges of AI. However, the most significant aspect of all this for us is that AlphaGo isn't just an "expert" system built with hand-crafted rules; instead it uses general machine learning techniques to figure out for itself how to win at Go. While games are the perfect platform for developing and testing AI algorithms quickly and efficiently, ultimately we want to apply these techniques to important real-world problems. Because the methods we've used are general-purpose, our hope is that one day they could be extended to help us address some of society's toughest and most pressing problems, from climate modelling to complex disease analysis. We're excited to see what we can use this technology to tackle next!

Posted by Demis Hassabis, Google DeepMind http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-UM6zXm-cXW4/VqkFrP32nlI/AAAAAAAARzw/HmxeOsYvvqk/s1600/Go-game_hero.jpg Demis HassabisGoogle DeepMind

27 Jan 2016 6:01pm GMT

26 Jan 2016

feedOfficial Google Blog

New ways to stay informed about presidential politics

In just two days, Americans will tune in for the final Republican debate before the 2016 primary season officially kicks off in Iowa, and we're teaming up with Fox News Channel to make sure every citizen can get the most out of it. To help people get informed before heading to the polls, we're integrating three new components into the debate: a way to hear directly from candidates on Google; real-time Google Trends data; and questions from some of YouTube's most prominent voices.

Hear from candidates directly, right on Google
Political search interest spikes 440 percent on average during live televised debates as people turn to the web to learn more about the candidates and their platforms. Now people will have a new way to hear directly from candidates themselves, in real-time-right in Google Search results. This experimental feature helps voters make more informed choices, and levels the playing field for candidates to share ideas and positions on issues they may not have had a chance to address during the debate. By publishing long-form text, photos and videos throughout the debate, campaigns can now give extended responses, answer questions they didn't get a chance to on stage, and rebut their opponents. As soon as the first debate begins at 7 p.m. ET on Thursday, search "Fox News debate" to find campaign responses.

Dig into issues with Google Trends
Throughout the debate, we'll also spotlight key insights from Google Trends that offer interesting insights about the candidates, issues, and debate topics-anything from questions asked about key issues to trending terms and rankings like the below minute-by-minute view of which candidate was searched most during the last debate.

You'll also be able to answer polling questions about the issues that matter to you directly on Google Search when you search "Fox News debate." Fox News will cover responses to these questions on air after the debate.

Watch YouTube creators engage with the candidates
Finally, three prominent YouTube creators-Nabela Noor, Mark Watson, and Dulce Candy-will join the moderators in the debate to ask the candidates a question on an issue that matters to them and their communities. Bringing new voices from YouTube to political debates is something we've been doing since the 2008 election, and it can lead to personal and powerful interactions between candidates and voters.

The debate begins at 7 p.m. ET on Thursday, with the prime time debate starting at 9 p.m. ET. So tune in to Fox News Channel to learn more about your presidential candidates on Google!

Posted by Danielle Bowers, Google News Lab http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-0qiDZwEYmuQ/VqgEMMg61mI/AAAAAAAARyk/rjVquq9izfE/s1600/GOP-debate_hero.jpg Danielle Bowers Google News Lab

26 Jan 2016 11:42pm GMT

feedGoogle Operating System

Top Results and Quick Answers in Google Inbox

I've always wondered why Gmail doesn't sort search results by relevance, just like Google Search. Gmail sorts results by date, so you can quickly find recent messages that match your query, and that's pretty useful, but sometimes you want to find an old email from a friend or a long-forgotten conversation about modern architecture.

Now Inbox search works a lot like Google Search. Google autocompletes your query and shows results as you type. There's also a "top results" section that shows the most relevant 5 results for your query. It's not perfect and it's easy to see why this doesn't replace the standard "sort by date": ranking email conversations is harder than ranking web pages. There are no links between messages, many messages are pretty short and are only important for a short while.


In addition to top results, Inbox also shows quick answers extracted from your messages. "Now when you're searching for a frequent flyer number or shipping status, Inbox will show it at the top of search results - no more digging through individual emails to find what you're looking for."


Quick answers are very big in the desktop site:

26 Jan 2016 7:35pm GMT

feedOfficial Google Blog

Helping refugees access education and information

Ahmed is an economics student from Aleppo in Syria. Last year he was forced to leave his hometown because of the war that has forced millions of his compatriots out of their country. He left his family and his studies-everything-behind to find a better future in Europe. Now safe in Berlin, his dream is to continue his studies and eventually become a teacher at a university in Germany.

As they make it through a dangerous journey, the first thing refugees need is to find shelter, food and access to care. But soon enough, they have to learn the local language, acquire skills to work in a new country, and figure out a way to continue their studies-all in an effort to reclaim and reconnect with the lives they had before.

Last fall, we shared how we're supporting organizations on the frontline of providing essential humanitarian relief support. But we also wanted to do something to help with refugees' long-term challenges, such as the need for access to information and education. So today, we're making a $5.3 million Google.org grant to support the launch of Project Reconnect, a program by NetHope to equip nonprofits working with refugees in Germany with Chromebooks, in order to facilitate easier access to education for refugees like Ahmed.

Chromebooks have proven to be a good fit for education purposes. They can be easily set up to run education or language learning apps. They're automatically kept up to date with the latest features, apps and virus protection. And they can be configured and managed by a central administrator (in this case the nonprofits) to offer relevant programs, content and materials depending on the situation. For example, they can run an educational game for children, a language course for younger adults or even feature information about the asylum application process on a pre-installed homepage.

Nonprofits can apply today on this website. Many organizations and their staff are doing incredible work in very difficult circumstances to help with this crisis. We hope that by supporting these nonprofits, we can help people like Ahmed on the next step of their journey.

Posted by Jacquelline Fuller, Director of Google.org

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-NyO22rEaB6c/Vqa50axfoMI/AAAAAAAARx8/DuUaNLtwFT0/s1600/Reconnect_hero.jpg Jacquelline Fuller Director Google.org

26 Jan 2016 12:12am GMT

24 Jan 2016

feedGoogle Operating System

YouTube Loop

Back in 2014, I found a way to loop YouTube videos using a feature of the HTML5 player. It looks like YouTube added "loop" as a standard feature. Just right click inside the HTML5 player and click "loop". This way, you can watch a video on repeat until you pause it or uncheck "loop" from the contextual menu.


It also works for embedded videos. Here's a short video you can use to test the loop feature:

24 Jan 2016 4:07pm GMT

Import Contacts in the New Google Contacts

When the latest version of Google Contacts launched last year, many features were missing. It looks like one of these features is back: you can now import contacts without switching to the old UI.

You can import contacts from Yahoo Mail, Outlook.com, AOL or from other email providers. If you want to import contacts from a CSV/vCard file, you'll still have to switch to the old interface.


Google uses a third-party service called ShuttleCloud for importing contacts. "To continue, you'll need to give ShuttleCloud temporary access to your contacts data, including names and email addresses," informs Google.


Another missing feature was restoring contacts. You can now "restore your contacts to any state within the past 30 days, recover deleted contacts, undo an import, or undo a merge."


Exporting contacts and printing contacts still require to go back to the old UI.

24 Jan 2016 11:29am GMT

New UI for Google's Weather Card

Google redesigned the weather card to include more information and images. The new weather card is only available in the Google Search app for Android, at least for now. "When you search for 'weather' or ask Google, 'will it rain today?' in the Google app on your Android phone, you'll get a wealth of new information, including: hourly sky conditions and chance of rain, severe weather alerts, a detailed 10-day forecast, air quality, UV index, sunrise and sunset times, and more," informs Google.

Google's new UI has 3 tabs for "today", "tomorrow" and "10 days". There's also a "humidity, wind, sunrise, and more details" link at the bottom of the card which allows you to expand it. You can also tap anywhere inside the card.



Google added an option to add a location to the weather list. This way, you can search for "weather" and see a list of all the locations you've added and the corresponding weather information. The search bar is now optimized for finding locations, so it's easier and faster to switch to a different city.


The "today" tab now includes information about sunrise, sunset, solar noon, length of the day, remaining daylight, dawn, dusk, dew point, pressure, UV index and visibility.


For some cities in the US, Japan, South Korea, India and other countries, you can find air quality information and health messages like "it's a great today to be active outside" or "avoid prolonged or heavy exertion". The source is EPA AirNow.




The "10 day" shows weather forecast for today and the following 9 days. Tap a day to find more details, including hourly weather forecast, wind, humidity, UV index, sunrise and sunset.


24 Jan 2016 10:04am GMT

22 Jan 2016

feedOfficial Google Blog

How we fought bad ads in 2015

When ads are good, they connect you to products or services you're interested in and make it easier to get stuff you want. They also keep a lot of what you love about the web-like news sites or mobile apps-free.

But some ads are just plain bad-like ads that carry malware, cover up content you're trying to see, or promote fake goods. Bad ads can ruin your entire online experience, a problem we take very seriously. That's why we have a strict set of policies for the kinds of ads businesses can run with Google-and why we've invested in sophisticated technology and a global team of 1,000+ people dedicated to fighting bad ads. Last year alone we disabled more than 780 million ads for violating our policies-a number that's increased over the years thanks to new protections we've put in place. If you spent one second looking at each of these ads, it'd take you nearly 25 years to see them all!

Here are some of the top areas we focused on in our fight against bad ads in 2015:

Busting bad ads
Some bad ads, like those for products that falsely claim to help with weight loss, mislead people. Others help fraudsters carry out scams, like those that lead to "phishing" sites that trick people into handing over personal information. Through a combination of computer algorithms and people at Google reviewing ads, we're able to block the vast majority of these bad ads before they ever get shown. Here are some types of bad ads we busted in 2015:

Counterfeiters
We suspended more than 10,000 sites and 18,000 accounts for attempting to sell counterfeit goods (like imitation designer watches).

Pharmaceuticals
We blocked more than 12.5 million ads that violated our healthcare and medicines policy, such as ads for pharmaceuticals that weren't approved for use or that made misleading claims to be as effective as prescription drugs.

Weight loss scams
Weight loss scams, like ads for supplements promising impossible-to-achieve weight loss without diet or exercise, were one of the top user complaints in 2015. We responded by suspending more than 30,000 sites for misleading claims.

Phishing
In 2015, we stepped up our efforts to fight phishing sites, blocking nearly 7,000 sites as a result.

Unwanted software
Unwanted software can slow your devices down or unexpectedly change your homepage and keep you from changing it back. With powerful new protections, we disabled more than 10,000 sites offering unwanted software, and reduced unwanted downloads via Google ads by more than 99 percent.

Trick to click
We got even tougher on ads that mislead or trick people into interacting with them-like ads designed to look like system warnings from your computer. In 2015 alone we rejected more than 17 million.

Creating a better experience
Sometimes even ads that offer helpful and relevant information behave in ways that can be really annoying-covering up what you're trying to see or sending you to an advertiser's site when you didn't intend to go there. In 2015, we disabled or banned the worst offenders.

Accidental mobile clicks
We've all been there. You're swiping through a slideshow of the best moments from the Presidential debate when an ad redirects you even though you didn't mean to click on it. We're working to end that. We've developed technology to determine when clicks on mobile ads are accidental. Instead of sending you off to an advertiser page you didn't mean to visit, we let you continue enjoying your slideshow (and the advertiser doesn't get charged).

Bad sites and apps
In 2015, we stopped showing ads on more than 25,000 mobile apps because the developers didn't follow our policies. More than two-thirds of these violations were for practices like mobile ads placed very close to buttons, causing someone to accidentally click the ad. There are also some sites and apps that we choose not to work with because they don't follow our policies. We also reject applications from sites and mobile apps that want to show Google ads but don't follow our policies. In 2015 alone, we rejected more than 1.4 million applications.

Putting you in control
We also give you tools to control the type of ads you see. You can always let us know when you believe an ad might be violating our policies.

Mute This Ad
Maybe you've just seen way too many car ads recently. "Mute This Ad" lets you click an "X" at the top on many of the ads we show and Google will stop showing you that ad and others like it from that advertiser. You can also tell us why. The 4+ billion pieces of feedback we received in 2015 are helping us show better ads and shape our policies.

Ads Settings
In 2015, we rolled out a new design for our Ads Settings where you can manage your ads experience. You can update your interests to make the ads you see more relevant, or block specific advertisers all together.

Looking ahead to 2016
We're always updating our technology and our policies based on your feedback-and working to stay one step ahead of the fraudsters. In 2016, we're planning updates like further restricting what can be advertised as effective for weight loss, and adding new protections against malware and bots. We want to make sure all the ads you see are helpful and welcome and we'll keep fighting to make that a reality.

Posted by Sridhar Ramaswamy, SVP, Ads & Commerce

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-CzH9B5r8W-c/VqE-GbdMYpI/AAAAAAAARwY/RpZ4_RPDtEM/s1600/Blog_Better_Ads_Report_Hero-17.png Sridhar Ramaswamy Senior Vice President Ads & Commerce

22 Jan 2016 7:31pm GMT

21 Jan 2016

feedOfficial Google Blog

YouTube creators interview President Obama following his final State of the Union

"We're going to have 21st century fireside chats where I'll speak directly to the American people in a way that I think will enhance democracy and strengthen our government." - Senator Barack Obama, November 15, 2007

Tomorrow evening, President Obama will deliver his final State of the Union address to Congress, which will broadcast live on YouTube. Then, as he has every year after the speech, he'll turn to YouTube and Google to take questions from Americans about the issues that matter to them.

This Friday, January 15, Destin Sandlin, Ingrid Nilsen, and Adande Thorne-three popular YouTube creators-will travel to Washington, D.C. to host a live YouTube Interview with President Obama. They'll join the President in the East Room of the White House, asking a selection of questions that are top of mind for them and their fans. You can watch the whole thing on the White House YouTube channel-and if you have a question for the President, suggest it by using the hashtag #YouTubeAsksObama on social media.

The interview will stream live on the White House YouTube channel on Friday, January 15 at 2:15 p.m. EST. And don't forget to tune in on January 12 at 9 p.m. EST to watch the State of the Union address live, as well as the Republican response, live on YouTube.

Throughout his time in office, President Obama has used technology to open up the doors (all 412 of them) to the White House-from posting behind-the-scenes photos of life in the West Wing to uploading a weekly address on the most pressing topics facing the nation. We're excited to have played a role in this process with our seven YouTube Interviews, tackling issues big and small, poignant and personal. We look forward to helping future presidents connect with Americans in compelling ways.

Posted by Ramya Raghavan, Google Politics http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-MhmPKKW9HG8/VqE4EO5N31I/AAAAAAAARwI/yQrj7TLJqkg/s1600/YT%2BPOTUS%2B2.jpg Ramya Raghavan Google Politics

21 Jan 2016 7:57pm GMT

Reach new heights with Street View of Mont Blanc in Google Maps

Declared the "monarch of mountains" by Lord Byron, the Mont Blanc massif is shrouded in mystery, rolling clouds and imposing snowfields. One of Europe's highest peaks, the wild terrain of the famed mountain range is reserved for ardent mountaineers and intrepid explorers. Starting today in Google Maps, you can get an up-close, 360-degree look at the breathtaking beauty of Mont Blanc. Following last year's first-ever vertical imagery collection of El Capitan in California's Yosemite National Park, we partnered with world-renowned alpine photographers, skiers, mountaineers, climbers, and runners to collect Street View of Western Europe's highest peak.


By working with legendary adventurers, the Street View team was able to capture the spirit of the massif in a way few witness firsthand. Run on the summit with Kilian Jornet-he holds the speed record for ascending and descending Mont Blanc in just 4 hours 57 minutes! Ice climb up a serac with record-setting alpine climber Ueli Steck, or go knee deep in powder alongside 14-time ski mountaineering champion Laetitia Roux and famed guide Patrick Gabarrou.

Ueli Steck ice climbing on Mont Blanc


You can also join French climbing legend Catherine Destivelle on the imposing yet beautiful Aiguille du Midi, the 3842-meter peak near the Mont Blanc. Or, crouch below innovative filmmaker and free skier Candide Thovex as he soars through the air or has fun as only he can-by taking his skis from the snow to the grass.

Catherine Destivelle ascending near the Aiguille du Midi


Renan Ozturk, acclaimed cinematographer and National Geographic Adventurer of the Year, alpine photographer Jonathan Griffith, and Sender Films joined Google on Mont Blanc as part of the team.

If reaching the top is what you care about, elite guide Korra Pesce joined the troupe by carrying the Street View Trekker up and down the Goûter Route of Mont Blanc. Click through the Street View to get his first-person perspective of each step to the summit.

Climb the entire Goûter Route of the Mont Blanc massif


Unfortunately, Mont Blanc's glaciers are receding due to climate change. You can learn more about how the rising temperatures are directly affecting the mountain from legendary guide Patrick Gabarrou, who describes the the glacial melt on the Mer de Glace. So this Street View imagery also serves as a digital record of Mont Blanc as it appears today, so future outdoor enthusiasts and scientists can look back at this time capsule to see how the mountain has changed.

Kilian Jornet on the summit of Mont Blanc


Whether you choose to run up the Mont Blanc with Kilian Jornet or ski down with Laetitia Roux, we hope you enjoy reaching new heights in Europe's beautiful and endangered mountain range.

Posted by Sandy Russell, Project Lead, Mont Blanc Street View

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-i70rtEuFhaA/VqAgIN7MI2I/AAAAAAAAEtw/PXgYz379QtA/s1600/Ueli%2BIce%2BClimbing_25MB.gif Sandy Russell Project Lead Mont Blanc Street View

21 Jan 2016 9:00am GMT

From self-portraits to street art: 1,000 museums at your fingertips

The history of art is global. Look at Van Gogh-a Dutchman who spent much of his life in France, and was inspired not only by his contemporaries but also by Japanese artists like Hiroshige. But until recently, the act of enjoying art and culture was limited by geography. Unless you could visit a museum in person, it would be hard for you to appreciate a work, brushstroke by brushstroke. And to fully understand the legacy of someone like Van Gogh, you would have to go from Amsterdam to Chicago to New York to Tokyo to discover and marvel at all of his influences, works and successors.

Left: Van Gogh's self-portrait (Chicago), right: a street art re-interpretation (Amsterdam)

But with the Google Cultural Institute, it's all just a few clicks away. Five years ago, the first 17 museums brought online a few hundred artworks so that anyone in the world could explore paintings, records and artifacts no matter where they were. Today, on our fifth birthday, the Google Cultural Institute has grown to include the collections of more than 1,000 museums and cultural institutions, with over 60 new ones added just today.

Starting today, you can descend through the famous rotunda of the Guggenheim museum in New York-a piece of art in itself-thanks to special aerial Street View imagery, or stroll the grand halls of the world's heaviest building, the Palace of Parliament in Romania. View Monet's famous water lilies in super-high "gigapixel" resolution and zoom in to see his layered brushstrokes-then visit Monsieur Monet's real-life garden to see his inspiration.

From "gigapixel" images to Street View inside museums, today's museums, galleries and theatres are turning to technology to help reach new audiences and inspire them with art and culture. And the possibilities keep expanding with the addition of newer technologies like virtual reality. Just recently we worked with the Dulwich Picture Gallery-England's oldest public art gallery-to take the young patients of King's College Hospital in London on a virtual field trip to the museum using Google Cardboard.

Young patients at King's College Hospital, London, were the first to experience the Dulwich Picture Gallery in virtual reality

Virtual visits will never replace the real thing. But technology can help open up art and culture to everyone, and we think that's a powerful thing. As you browse the Google Cultural Institute's 6 million objects exploring humanity's diverse heritage across 70 countries-from this prehistoric equivalent of the Swiss Army knife in the Netherlands, to the Taj Mahal in India and manga drawings in Japan-we hope you'll agree.

Posted by Amit Sood, director of the Google Cultural Institute IMAGE URL Amit Sood Director Google Cultural Institute

21 Jan 2016 8:01am GMT

19 Jan 2016

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Solving a Verizon issue (Nexus 5X)

I solved a problem today and figured that I'd document it for the rest of the world. Every time someone left me a voicemail on Verizon, I would get a cryptic text from Verizon at 900080006202 that looked like "//VZWVVM:SYNC:ev=NM;id=1;c=1;t=v;s=1XXXXXXXXXX;dt=18/01/2016 13:40-0900;l=13;dev_t=5" or "//VZWVVM:SYNC:ev=MBU;dev_t=5". Here's what happened. It turns out that Verizon has three kinds of […]

19 Jan 2016 2:00am GMT

17 Jan 2016

feedGoogle Operating System

New File Picker in Google Inbox

Google Inbox has a new attachment picker. When you compose a new message and click the paperclip icon, Google now shows a list of recently received attachments, a list of recently sent attachments and the latest photos uploaded to Google Photos. Click "show more" to see the rest of the attachments and photos. You can also select files from your computer. Unfortunately, there's no Google Drive integration yet.

"Inbox by Gmail on the web now makes it easier to share memories with instant access to recent photos and attachments," informs Google.


{ Thanks, Jonah Langlieb. }

17 Jan 2016 2:36pm GMT

08 Jan 2016

feedOfficial Google Blog

#SpecialDelivery: Google Spotlight Stories come to YouTube with interactive 360-degree storytelling

A humble caretaker is surprised when a mysterious stranger causes mischief on the roof. He investigates, but can't seem to catch even a glimpse of the troublemaker. And so the chase goes... room to room… up and down… The stranger remains just out of sight, leaving behind only a trail of gifts…

Meanwhile, you're following the action at your own pace, from whatever angle you please-behind you, to your left, to your right, or in front of you. All on your mobile phone.

Today we're bringing Google Spotlight Stories to YouTube with "Special Delivery," an original short film made by Academy Award-winning animation studio Aardman Animations (Wallace and Gromit fans, take note), viewable on the YouTube app on many Android devices.

"Special Delivery" is the latest of several Spotlight Stories to come out of Google ATAP (our Advanced Technology and Projects group). With Google Spotlight Stories, your phone becomes a window to a story happening all around you. The sensors on your phone allow the story to be interactive, so when you move your phone to various scenes, you unlock mini-stories within the story.

We didn't want anyone to miss Aardman's "Pink Panther"-style holiday caper! So we also made a YouTube 360 version for other Android devices, iOS devices, and the web. You can find both versions of "Special Delivery" on the Spotlight Stories YouTube channel, and you can also watch with Google Cardboard. Next year, we'll bring Google Spotlight Stories to more Android devices and the YouTube iOS app.

You'll want to watch "Special Delivery" a few times to find all the surprises within the story. In the full interactive experience, you'll encounter 10 subplots, three potential ways to view the ending, and 60+ moments where you can decide to follow the story in different ways. Each viewing is unique. We don't want to spoil the ending, so that's all we'll say for now…

Posted by Rachid El Guerrab, Technical Project Lead, Spotlight Stories, Google ATAP

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-mbUAzRH7Bao/VnjmzqSrsjI/AAAAAAAARm8/Sj0CZl2NS3g/s1600/SLS_SpecialDelivery_Twitter_1.gif Rachid El Guerrab Technical Project Lead, Spotlight Stories Google ATAP

08 Jan 2016 3:09am GMT

ICYMI: A few stocking stuffers from around Google

Between last-minute gift shopping, airport pickups, cookie baking, and ugly-sweater parties, there's a lot to do this season. So you may have missed a few updates from around Google that can actually make your holiday season a little brighter (or at least make your to-do list go a little faster. Won't make your sweater any less ugly, though). Here's a look at what we've unwrapped recently:

Add this one to your to-do list: Reminders in Google Calendar
Whether it's "send holiday cards" or "use up FSA," you can now add Reminders to Google Calendar to help you complete your to-do list. These aren't like those calendar entries you create yourself that you plain-old ignore completely and that then disappear. With Reminders, if you don't complete the task and dismiss the Reminder, it'll pop up on your calendar again the next day. And the next. And the … until you can't take it anymore and just send those holiday cards already. You'll thank us when your list is checked off. Twice.

Now on Tap gets handier for the holidays
Now on Tap helps you get quick information without leaving the app you're using by tapping and holding the home button on Android phones-and new updates make it even handier for the holidays. So if you get a text with your cousin's flight number, you can tap and hold to see the flight's status, then respond without having to juggle between searching and texting. If you ordered a gift online and want to know if it will make it down the chimney and under the tree on time, tap and hold your confirmation email to get tracking info. Consider it your own personal Santa's Little Helper.

Tell the family when to expect you with trip bundles
There's probably a lot going on in your email right now if you've got an upcoming trip home or holiday getaway planned. From your flight confirmation to rental car details, Inbox by Gmail already groups these emails into trip bundles so you can find everything you need for your trip quickly. Those bundles just got even more useful-you can now access them offline (good for on the plane), share the trip summary with friends or family, and add other pertinent emails (like that message with your aunt's new address) to the bundle.

Templates in Google Docs go mobile
If you're collecting family recipes or planning a trip, templates in Docs, Sheets and Slides help you get started faster, so you can spend more time concentrating on the words you're writing and less time worrying about how it looks. These pre-made templates are now available on Android and iOS so you can do more while on the go. Ho, ho, ho!

Posted by Abbi Tatton, Google Editorial Elf http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-mX0dxJxp8dg/Vo8MSdxypWI/AAAAAAAARsI/EjaFhvgAEgc/s1600/Beutler_Google_Giftwrap_-v2TW.png Abbi Tatton Editorial Elf Google

08 Jan 2016 1:10am GMT

We read the news today, oh boy: It’s The Beatles, on Google Play Music

No need for fussing or fighting, my friend. Now you can live on a Yellow Submarine, march in Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Band or go to Strawberry Fields Forever. Starting on December 24, all 13 of The Beatles' iconic original albums, plus four essential Beatles collections, will be available to stream on Google Play Music-enough music to fill up eight days a week.

The best-selling band in history, with 20 number one Billboard Hot 100 hits, The Beatles continue to be one of the world's most beloved bands decades after their last original album. So, what lyrics take a sad song and make it better? What albums get you through a hard day's night? Come together, right now, to take a look at some of the top Beatles searches, according to Google Trends.

1. Abbey Road 2. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band 3. Help! 4. Let It Be 5. Magical Mystery Tour

1. Hey Jude 2. Yesterday 3. Come Together 4. Help! 5. Let It Be

Bonus: If you open up the Google app on your Android phone and say "Ok Google, play the Beatles," There will be an answer. Let it stream.

In the words of Ed Sullivan: "Ladies and Gentlemen, The Beatles!"

Posted by Gwen Shen, Music Partnerships, Google Play

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-lAaDf35rKZo/Vo8GMQnf3-I/AAAAAAAARrk/KDMg871KKHc/s1600/Beatles_2.png Gwen Shen Music Partnerships Google Play

08 Jan 2016 12:46am GMT

‘Tis the season for Santa Tracker

'Tis the night before Christmas, at our northernmost pole
And all through Santa's Village it's almost time to roll.
The elves have been working hard for this night
Santa's village is abuzz-tonight's the big flight!


Google's Santa Tracker launches today-
And it's time to follow the jolly man's sleigh.
He's off on his trip 'round the world
Delivering toys to all good boys and girls.

You've got a front-row seat to the show
Just fire up Google Maps to see where he goes.
Thanks to the elves' precisely coded route
Santa and his reindeer will fly swiftly-look out!

Now the sleigh tuning's done,
Tales of global traditions spun,
Every gift in the sleigh gently placed,
Wrapped with care, without haste.


The reindeer are prancing and eager to fly,
Ready for Santa's trip through the sky.
With so little time to get their job done-
They may need your help on this gift-giving run.


So keep the translation tool handy;
Geography trivia would also be dandy.
There's no telling what Santa might need
Traveling from Brisbane to Lima to Leeds.

Now Dasher! Now, Dancer! Now, Prancer and Vixen!
Join in on the fun-find out what you're missin'!
On Maps! On Android, Chromecast and Google.com!
There's something for everyone, from kids to mom.


So watch that sleigh as it takes to the air,
And wherever you are, St. Nick will soon be there.
To borrow a phrase, as Santa takes flight-
"Happy holidays to all, and to all a good-night!"


Posted by Luke Mahé, Chief Excitement Officer http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-F-nCS-J-76A/Vo8GNVQysoI/AAAAAAAARro/tl49aHijxhY/s1600/SantaTracker2015_2.jpg Luke Mahé Chief Excitement Officer

08 Jan 2016 12:45am GMT

16 Dec 2015

feedOfficial Google Blog

YouTube and NBC News present Democratic primary debate in South Carolina

From presidential candidates launching their campaigns, to YouTube creators discussing issues that matter to their communities, to light-hearted moments along the campaign trail, you've already been following the 2016 U.S. election from multiple angles on YouTube.

Now you can watch the candidates debate on YouTube, too.

Next month, we'll join together with NBC News to present the final DNC sanctioned Democratic presidential debate before the first caucus and primary votes are cast-with the action live streamed on YouTube. The NBC News-YouTube Democratic Candidates Debate, hosted by the Congressional Black Caucus Institute and moderated by Lester Holt, will take place on Sunday, January 17, 2016, in Charleston, S.C., airing on NBC from 9-11 p.m. ET and streamed live on the NBC News YouTube channel.

With so many YouTube fans following this election closely, of course there will be an opportunity for you to get involved. Along with Google Trends data, the debate will feature questions from the YouTube community. Look out for more information on how you can engage in the coming weeks.

Since 2005 you've made YouTube a home for global politics, and today you watch more than 5 million hours of news on YouTube every day. Over the course of 2016, you'll be able to find all of the major election moments unfold on YouTube-tune in to the NBC News YouTube channel January 17 to kick off the election year.

Posted by Brandon Feldman, YouTube News, and Steve Grove, Google News Lab
IMAGE URL AUTHOR NAME AUTHOR TITLE AUTHOR TEAM

16 Dec 2015 6:00pm GMT

Search on: 2015 in Google Search

From devastation to empowerment and tragedy to hope, our 15th annual Year in Search uncovers the moments that captured the world's hearts-and questions that revealed who we are. From "How can I help Nepal" to "How can the world find peace?" here's a look back at 2015, through the lens of Google search.

Searching for ways to help
Within two minutes of the deadly attack on Paris in November, the French capital was searching for information on the assault underway in their city. Less than 10 minutes later, the rest of the world started searching. As of today, we've seen more than 897 million searches about the city as the world came together to "Pray for Paris."

Global showings of support and offerings of help were a key topic in search this year. Following the Nepal earthquake, "how can I help Nepal?" was a top global search. From Somerville, Mass. to Ludwigsberg, Germany, people asked how to volunteer and what to donate.

Searching for perspective
While questions around Nepal were similar around the world, the migrant crisis in Europe spiked a wider variety of queries. From Italy asking "How to adopt a Syrian orphan child?" to Germany wondering "Where are the refugees coming from?" the world turned to Google to understand the situation and what it meant for them.

In the U.S., the topic of guns brought varying questions. From Portland, Ore. to Austin, Texas, people across the country searched for "what is gun control," "why do we need gun control," "why won't gun control work" and more to understand the issue. With more than 160 million searches, interest in gun control spiked higher than interest for gun shops-typically a more popular search-at multiple points in 2015.

Searching for acceptance
In June, we met Caitlyn Jenner, someone we'd both always known and were meeting for the first time. Across the globe, she was searched more than 344 million times, and her story helped give a new voice to the transgender community.

People cheered "#lovewins" when the U.S. Supreme Court made a monumental ruling that gay marriages should be recognized at both the State and Federal level. The reaction was instant, with search interest in both same-sex marriage and the Supreme Court reaching higher than at any time in Google's history.

Searching for… the dress, the Force and the singer
Turning to the Search watercooler, the year began with the world divided over an important question: is it white and gold? or blue and black? Days of debate and 73 million searches later, "black and blue dress" topped searches of "white and gold dress," and the matter was settled forever (right?).

And though "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" is just hitting theaters this week, it's already taken the Internet by storm(trooper). The trailer alone garnered more than 155 million searches! But the all-time high for Google searches around "Star Wars" was in 2005 after "The Revenge of the Sith" came out in theaters-can we beat it this week?

Finally, what better way to close out the year than by saying "Hello"? With the debut of "25," Adele broke records by the week, putting her album at the top of the charts and skyrocketing to the top of Google Search faster than any other musician this year.

Hundreds of stories in depth
The 2015 Year in Search goes deeper than we've ever gone before. This year, we're covering hundreds of news stories, sharing interactive guides and charts, and diving into the numbers by sharing things like how many times people searched for Adele (439 million, if you want to know!).

See how all of the biggest stories of the year compared:


Go to Google.com/2015 to explore the rest of the 2015 Year in Search stories and top trending charts from around the world.

Posted by Amit Singhal, Senior Vice President, Search http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-szT0CpTrHss/VnEWdApFBxI/AAAAAAAARlU/L-tT2ireW74/s1600/YIS-Mars-Blog.jpg Amit Singhal Senior Vice President Search

16 Dec 2015 8:00am GMT

10 Dec 2015

feedGoogle Operating System

Google Play Music Family Plan

Google Play Music started to offer a new family plan: $14.99/month for up to 6 family members, just like Apple Music. You and 5 other family members can subscribe to Google Play Music All Access and keep your own playlists, radio stations, ratings and recommendations. The new family plans are available in the US, Canada, the UK, Australia, France and Germany, while also requiring regular Google accounts (no Google Apps, for now). You can only sign up from the Google Play Music app for Android, but everything else works for all the platforms supported by Google Play Music.



Google says you can "share a payment method on Google Play so your family can purchase apps, movies, books and music." It looks like Google will add a family sharing feature for Google Play, so that purchases are shared between family members, just like in iOS. Hopefully, sharing the payment method will be optional.

10 Dec 2015 11:34pm GMT

Save Google's Image Search Results

If you find beautiful images using Google Image Search's mobile site, you can save them and organize them using a new Google service. Just tap the star icon next to a search result and the image is saved to your account. Go to google.com/save to see all the images and add tags or notes (the link only works from mobile Chrome and Safari).





"When using your phone or tablet's web browser, you can easily save images you find in Google search results as links. You can see your saved images, which are similar to bookmarks, when you're signed in to your Google Account. You can return to your saved images at any time and add tags to organize them," informs Google.

10 Dec 2015 10:46pm GMT

08 Dec 2015

feedGoogle Operating System

Reminders in Google Calendar

Google Calendar's apps for Android and iOS now let you add reminders, just like you can do using Google Keep, Google Search or Google Inbox. This feature is rolling out this week if you have the latest version of the Google Calendar's mobile app. Until now, you could only see your reminders in Google Calendar.


"You might already create calendar entries to remind you to call the doctor or pick up groceries on the way home. But while those entries come and go, Reminders stick with you over time so you can track them until they are actually done. If a Reminder isn't completed, it will appear at the top of your Calendar the next day. And the next. When you do finally call the doctor or pick up those necessities, just swipe the Reminder away ... and you're onto the next to-do," informs Google.

Calendar events are different from reminders, but you can now manage them from the same app. Google promises to bring this feature to the Google Calendar web app in the near future.

08 Dec 2015 2:07pm GMT

All Tab in Google Search

Google has a new name for the "web" tab from search results pages. It's now called "all", which better reflects that Google no longer shows only web pages, but also quick answers, facts, images, videos, news, maps, apps, books and more. That's the whole idea behind Universal Search, which was launched back in 2007.


08 Dec 2015 1:51pm GMT

24 Nov 2015

feedGoogle Operating System

Travel Guide Snippets in Knowledge Graph Cards

Google's Knowledge Graph cards include a lot of information from Wikipedia. Google usually shows a snippet from a Wikipedia article and links to the article. I was surprised to notice that cards for countries and big cities from all over the world no longer quote Wikipedia and now include detailed information from travel guides.

Here's an example for [France]: "France, in Western Europe, encompasses medieval and port cities, tranquil villages, mountains and Mediterranean beaches. Paris, its capital, is known worldwide for its couture fashion houses, classical art museums including the Louvre and monuments like the Eiffel Tower. The country is also renowned for its sophisticated cuisine and its wines. Lascaux's ancient cave drawings, Lyon's Roman theater and the immense Palace of Versailles are testaments to its long history."


The snippet from the corresponding Wikipedia article is less poetic: "France, officially the French Republic, is a sovereign state comprising territory in western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The European part of France, called Metropolitan France, extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. France spans 640,679 square kilometres (247,368 sq mi) and has a total population of 67 million. It is a unitary semi-presidential republic with the capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre."

24 Nov 2015 10:00pm GMT

Show Zoom Slider in Google Maps

Are you missing the zoom controls from the old Google Maps interface for the desktop? Mouse over the "-" or "+" button at the bottom of the Google Maps page and click "show slider". You'll get the old zoom slider which allows you to quickly control the zoom level of the map.



If you want to go back to the default interface, mouse over the "-" or "+" button and click "hide slider". The nice thing is that Google remembers your preference.

24 Nov 2015 9:43pm GMT

Big Offline Google Maps

I don't know about you, but my Google Maps for Android has just enabled the new offline features. Even if you have the latest version of the app, you still need to wait until these features are enabled because they're gradually rolled out.

My first disappointment is that the new features are still limited. The biggest size for an offline area you can download is 120,000 square kilometers and there are many countries that are bigger than that. I downloaded London's map and checked the size of the map: 332 MB. It also expires in 29 days (maps need to be updated at least every 30 days).



It looks like Google's maps include too much information, they take up too much space and there's no way to download some simplified maps.

Let's try one of the smallest countries in Europe: Liechtenstein, which has an area of only 160 square kilometers. The offline map has 62 MB. New York? 409 MB. Los Angeles? 356 MB. Tokyo, Seoul, Beijing, Bangkok? Not available because of licensing issues.


Forget about downloading the map for an entire country. Google Maps still can't replace the Here app or paid navigation apps.

24 Nov 2015 9:10pm GMT

Google Star Wars Experience

Google has a new site for Star Wars fans. You can join the dark side or the light side and transform your Google experience across Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Maps, Waze, Google Translate, YouTube, and other Google services.


"We reached out to our friends at Lucasfilm and Disney, and since then we've been working together on building google.com/starwars. It's a place for fans, by fans, and starting today you can choose the light or the dark side, and then watch your favorite Google apps like Gmail, Google Maps, YouTube, Chrome and many more transform to reflect your path. And that's just the beginning. We've got more coming between now and opening night - the Millennium Falcon in all its (virtual reality) glory included, so stay tuned. And we've hidden a few easter eggs, too. So awaken the Force within, and be on the lookout for things from a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away," mentions Google's blog.


There's a new Star Wars theme in Gmail, a new progress bar for the loading page and probably some other changes.



Google Inbox has a Star Wars background image.


Google Calendar adds some Star Wars events like "Star Wars: The Force Awakens in theaters everywhere".


YouTube has a new progress bar for Star Wars fans. Check the player too.

24 Nov 2015 11:23am GMT

Google's Deals Alerts

Google's mobile search site shows some ads that promote a new notification service. Google's own ads feature a "subscribe" button that lets you "stay up to date on the latest deals, promotions, and updates from popular retailers". Basically, you'll get deals via text messages, just in time for Black Friday.


Tap the "subscribe" button and then you can text "join" to Google's SMS number: +1-646-665-2745. There are multiple alerts for phones, computers, TVs and more.

24 Nov 2015 11:13am GMT

13 Nov 2015

feedGoogle Operating System

Chrome Beta for iOS

In addition to the stable channel, there are 3 other Chrome channels you can use to check the latest features before they're released for everyone: beta, dev and canary. Canary builds are only for Windows and Mac, the dev channel is available for Windows, Mac, Linux, Chrome OS and Android, while the beta channel is available for Windows, Mac, Linux, Chrome OS, Android and now iOS.

That's right, you can try out Chrome Beta for iOS. You need to enter your email address and confirm you "understand that Google will share your information with Apple in order to participate in the TestFlight program". Google will send a confirmation email. "Once you have confirmed your e-mail address, you can expect to receive an invitation to join TestFlight within a few minutes."




Install the TestFlight app on your iOS device, tap "redeem" and enter the code from the invitation. If you've already installed Chrome on your phone or tablet, TestFlight will ask you if "you want to replace the current app version with the test version".

Right now, you can upgrade from Chrome 46.0.2490.73 to Chrome 47.0.2526.53. The new version adds support for more Bluetooth keyboard shortcuts (open/close/change tabs and voice search) and adds 3D touch support on iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus (force touch the Chrome icon to open a new tab, a new incognito tab or start a voice search).



{ Thanks, Stefan. }

13 Nov 2015 3:42pm GMT

YouTube Music

YouTube launched specialized mobile apps for kids, gamers and now for music lovers. YouTube Music replaces the music section from the regular YouTube app and provides a better interface for playing music. There are no comments, you can switch between the video mode and the audio-only mode, the autoplay feature is enabled by default and you can't disable it.

"With YouTube Music, you'll get a completely new type of experience, designed to make discovering music on YouTube easier than ever. No matter where you start in the app, the music will never stop. Every song you play or artist you choose will take you on an endless journey through YouTube's music catalog. (...) The home tab will recommend tracks just for you and create personalized stations based on your tastes," informs the YouTube blog.

You can download YouTube Music from Google Play Store and Apple App Store, but only in the US. If you're not in the US and you manage to install the app, you won't be able to use it without a proxy/VPN service.

YouTube Music works even better if you use YouTube Red, so you get the YouTube Red features for free for 14 days. No ads, background audio, offline music.






13 Nov 2015 3:11pm GMT

31 Oct 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Halloween 2015: USB Drive

I went a little overboard for Halloween last year. And as you can tell from my the Halloween category on my blog, sometimes I get a little too excited about Halloween. So this year I decided to go quick, easy, and lo-fi as a USB drive: To make a thumb drive/USB key, I just took […]

31 Oct 2015 8:02pm GMT

24 Sep 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Give Google Contributor a try

Recently I've seen several interesting conversations about ad blocking, and I wanted to remind people about a great offering called Google Contributor. With Google Contributor, you contribute a certain amount of money each month. That subscription means that you see fewer ads on the web, and you support the sites that you visit with your […]

24 Sep 2015 3:09pm GMT

09 Apr 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Berkshire Hathaway

My taste in financial advice runs toward the simple and the lessons I've learned the hard way. But I still like reading about investing/finance, and I recently read through the 2014 annual report for Berkshire Hathaway. Given that it was the 50th anniversary of Warren Buffett taking charge of Berkshire, I have to admit that […]

09 Apr 2015 6:47am GMT

01 Apr 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

My next project: AutoSEO

This was an April Fool's joke. I've been working really hard with some friends on a project to handle SEO automatically. Now we're ready to take the wraps off it over at seo.ninja. One of the ideas that helped the World Wide Web succeed was that it separated presentation and content. You could write your […]

01 Apr 2015 12:23am GMT

01 Mar 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Next 30 day challenge: social media/news cleanse

For January 2015, I tried to declutter around the house for 15 minutes a day. We now have a couple rooms that are much cleaner, and I gave away a bunch of magazines. For February 2015, my 30 day challenge was to go on daily 15 minute walks with my wife. That was nice. Lately […]

01 Mar 2015 4:40am GMT

19 Feb 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Fixing “full path disclosure” issues

Whether you're running a web service or a blog, you should always keep your software fully patched to prevent attacks and minimize your attack surface. Another smart step is to prevent full path disclosures. For example, if your blog or service throws an error like "Warning: require(ABSPATHwp-includes/load.php) [function.require]: failed to open stream: No such file […]

19 Feb 2015 6:43am GMT

23 Jan 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

Lessons learned from the early days of Google

Earlier this month I did a talk at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill about lessons learned from the early days of Google. The video is now online and watchable, or you can watch it on YouTube: We did the talk in a pretty large room, and the camera at the back of […]

23 Jan 2015 8:44pm GMT

02 Jan 2015

feedMatt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

My two favorite books of 2014

I'd like to mention two books that stood out for me in 2014: Nonfiction: The First 20 Minutes. Gretchen Reynolds is a New York Times columnist who distills health and exercise research down to practical, readable advice. I've never dog-eared as many pages in a book as The First 20 Minutes. Reynolds writes about why […]

02 Jan 2015 4:08am GMT

26 Aug 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

The Emperor's Garden

The Emperor instructed the gardener to set up the new court's garden. "I want you to plant five trees growing the Crataan fruit," the Emperor said, "Because we asked people what fruit they like best, and most named the Crataan fruit!" The gardener replied, "Emperor, that is excellent thinking! But let me make some suggestions: First, how about we make one of the five trees bear the Muran fruit. Only one out of ten citizens loves it, but those peculiar citizens tend to love multiple times as much!" "Second," the gardener continued, "How about we make one of the five trees bear the Dratean fruit. No one loves it, but that's because no one knows it yet!" "Third," the gardener said, "How about we leave one spot in the garden empty. Who knows what new type of tree we'll discover that we can put there in the fut ...

26 Aug 2011 12:12pm GMT

15 Aug 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Color Sound Machine (and what else I've been doing lately)

For those of you who've been wondering whether I had turned to stone, fallen into a bottomless pit, or been climbing the Himalaya... no, none of that is true, even though you probably did notice I'm not actively blogging about Google here anymore*! Just now, a new iPad app I've been working on called Color Sound Machine went live, and this -- and all the other apps and games at Versus Pad** -- are actually what I am doing while not blogoscoping. *I've drafted unpublished posts explaining much more about past, present and future of Blogoscoped, and the history of Google news reporting, but ... oh, for now le ...

15 Aug 2011 4:00pm GMT

25 Feb 2011

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Google drops reverse phone number lookup

One of the earliest specialist services provided by Google was reverse phone number lookup. If you used the "phonebook:" or "rphonebook:" operators together with a 10-digit US phone number, Google would show you the owner of that phone number, unless the number was unlisted. Google no longer provides that service. Not surprisingly, there was no press release marking the closure, but Google employee Daniel Russell has acknowledged the closure of the service in his blog. He hints at the possible pressures leading to the shuttering of the service: "As you can imagine, this was an endless source of hassles for people (who were surprised to see themselves searchable on Google) and for Google (who had to constantly de ...

25 Feb 2011 11:23am GMT

16 Dec 2010

feedGoogle Blogoscoped

Idea: Topical Chat

This website would take the top headlines from a tech or political site for that day -- at first just from Reddit (you gotta start somewhere), but later, from other sites too, in aggregated form, similar to Techmeme, but across different topics you can navigate to from the frontpage (entertainment, politics, technology etc.). It would present them in some sort of list of headlines with a link to the discussion source. Below every headline on the frontpage there's an expandable chat box window. You log-in once into the site and then you can expand any one of these chat boxes, and see who's in there, and read the chat log, and join yourself with remarks by typing them in a box, similar to IRC and others. The chat wouldn't be a replacement of the discussion going on at the other site, but an addition to it. One benefit: a discus ...

16 Dec 2010 2:55pm GMT

Idea: CrowdChat

Two groups have a text chat using a web interface, arguing about a certain topic. For Group B to reply to what Group A says, each member of Group B proposes a sentence. Then, each member of Group B quickly votes on which sentence of another member of their group they like best. (You don't have to propose a sentence, and you don't have to vote on one; both proposing a sentence as well as voting on one are time-limited to just a certain amount of seconds, though.) Then, the highest-voted sentence will be shown to Crowd A as answer. Crowd A now goes through the same process to formulate a reply directed at Crowd B, and so on. To join, you can pick any of the two crowds based on reading the chat log, provided this group hasn't reach its limit of X members (beyond just group size that limit may also depend on how active current me ...

16 Dec 2010 7:26am GMT

Google Body Browser

If you're using the Google Chrome developer channel (or Firefox 4 Beta) have a look at the new Body Browser to explore a body in 3D. [Via Google OS.]

16 Dec 2010 2:17am GMT

10 Dec 2010

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Pictures of the Cr-48

MBegin in the forum writes: I ran home for lunch today and was VERY pleasantly surprised to find a Cr-48 Chrome OS Notebook at my doorstep!! -Thanks Google! I took a few quick pics and I'll post more about my experiences later... Feel free to bug MBegin with questions in this post's comments, just in case he finds time to get around answering them!

10 Dec 2010 5:23am GMT

09 Dec 2010

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Chromedroidpad

Using open source technologies from Google, could someone create a tablet that would let you add both Chrome Web Store apps/ web apps in general, as well as Android Market place apps, and you as user wouldn't even need to bother much about which comes from where as you'd only see a single merged Store, and apps would all be added to a nice homescreen with icons like on the iPad, and apps would always open full-screen no matter if the app maker made it that way or not, and Flash would work too? And would anyone want that thing?

09 Dec 2010 12:40pm GMT

08 Dec 2010

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Device Evolution

Watching evolution is fun, especially when it happens right around you, and happens so fast. A mutation we saw yesterday was a new animal scientists gave the name "Chrome OS Notebook", but it's surrounded by other smart animals of all kinds and shapes. What do they fight for? Their nature are our offices, living rooms, cafes and parks; their food are our individual interests. Computing devices: the more we have, the less we notice them. Sneaky things, changing the color of their skin on different backgrounds... we don't even know they're computers anymore! The sneakier they fade in, the more likely they'll hunt down our interest when it appears. You're in your room, and you just had the idea of going to a cafe to read a newspaper, and perhaps chat with some friends. You can now hear small leafs crack, the surroundin ...

08 Dec 2010 5:17am GMT

17 Nov 2010

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How to Disable Google Instant Previews

If you find Google's Instant Previews feature as useless as I do -- you know, those images popping up near search results, often similarly unwanted (when triggered by a wrong click) as Snap site previews -- maybe this User script is for you. I use several machines and browsers, though, so always installing add-ons when Google rolls out something unwanted is suboptimal in the long run (opening links in a new window is something else I don't like, for instance, and whenever I disable it -- even if I would do so across browsers and machines -- it'll come back the next time I empty my cache, because Google thinks that's best for people located in China; another feature which I practically never use is the left-hand side bar... perhaps one day we'll need a Simple Google add-on to get r ...

17 Nov 2010 3:08am GMT

16 Nov 2010

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Google's Newest Q&A Service: "baraza"

Google's newest Question and Answer service is Google baraza beta, launched on 25 October 2010. Baraza is offered in English and French, although Google's links to the French questions aren't working for me. Baraza operates on a Points basis. You get 20 points for signing up, and 4 points each day you log in. If you are already logged into your Google account, there isn't actually any signup process. Your name and photo from your Google profile are automatically used, although you can change your username and avatar if you like. Asking a question costs 5 points, and you earn 5 points for choosing a "best answer" for your question, so you can use the service on an ongoing ...

16 Nov 2010 4:20am GMT

15 Nov 2010

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Taped an iPhone to my remote-controlled car and hit the Record button

15 Nov 2010 8:26am GMT

12 Nov 2010

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Playable JavaScript app of my new iPad game Knights vs Knightesses (Google Chrome/ Safari needed)

Here's a fully playable web demo of my new free iPad two-player game Knights vs Knightesses... it runs in Google Chrome and Safari. Note the graphics load much slower than the iPad app because it's online. If you're interested, the full source is viewable. It's all JavaScript because I'm using the PhoneGap wrapper for this one.

12 Nov 2010 7:00am GMT

04 Nov 2010

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Which of your websites, deleted or lost years ago (or on a backup in a box you can't seem to find), would you most like to get back?

The release of a massive but not complete Geocities archive made me wonder about all the past stuff we probably can't recover anymore (and the usage of stylesheets over time makes design changes so easy that they're also easily undocumented) -- so my question: Which of your lost websites would you most love to get back?

04 Nov 2010 2:58am GMT

24 Oct 2010

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See a Random Street View Location

Click the MapCrunch Go button and you'll be transported to a random (Google Street View covered) place in the world. [Via Reddit.]

24 Oct 2010 6:42am GMT