26 Jul 2017

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Bastien Nocera: New Evince format support: Adobe Illustrator and CBR files

A quick update, as we've touched upon Evince recently.

I mentioned that we switched from using external tools for decompression to using libarchive. That's not the whole truth, as we switched to using libarchive for CBZ, CB7 and the infamous CBT, but used a copy/paste version of unarr to support RAR files, as libarchive support lacks some needed features.

We hope to eventually remove the internal copy of unarr, but, as a stop-gap, that allowed us to start supporting CBR comics out of the box, and it's always a good thing when you have one less non-free package to grab from somewhere to access your media.

The second new format is really two formats, from either side of the 2-digit-year divide: PostScript-based Adobe Illustrator and PDF-based Adobe Illustrator. Evince now declares to support "the format" if both of the backends are built and supported. It only took 12 years, and somebody stumbling upon the feature request while doing bug triaging. The nooks and crannies of free software where the easy feature requests get lost :)


Both features will appear in GNOME 3.26, the out-of-the-box CBR support is however available now in an update for the just released Fedora 26.

26 Jul 2017 1:42pm GMT

Christian Schaller: Running Wayland on the Nvidia driver

I know many of you have wanted to test running Wayland on NVidia. The work on this continues between Jonas Ådahl, Adam Jackson and various developers at NVidia. It is not ready for primetime yet as we are still working on the server side glvnd piece we need for XWayland. That said with both Adam Jackson looking at this from our side and Kyle Brenneman looking at it from NVidia I am sure we will be able to hash out the remaining open questions and get that done.

In the meantime Miguel A. Vico from NVidia has set up a Copr to let people start testing using EGLStreams under Wayland. I haven't tested it myself yet, but if you do and have trouble make sure to let Miguel and Jonas know.

As a sidenote, I am heading off to GUADEC in Manchester tomorrow and we do plan to discuss efforts like these there. We have team members like Jonas Ådahl flying in from Taiwan and Peter Hutterer flying in from Australia, so it will be a great chance to meet core developers who are far away from us in terms of timezone and geographical distance. GUADEC this year should be a lot of fun and from what I hear we are going to have record level attendance this year based early registration numbers, so if you can make it Manchester I strongly recommend joining us as I think this years event will have a lot of energy and a lot of interesting discussions on what the next steps are for GNOME.

26 Jul 2017 12:21pm GMT

24 Jul 2017

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Eric Anholt: 2017-07-24

This week's VC5 progress included:

VC5's GLES3 correctness is reaching the point where I need to start building the 7268 kernel driver, and then do some of the basic performance work (shader threading, QPU instruction scheduling)

I made another small fix to the X11 copy performance series I have, that improves things when windows have rounded corners, and spent a while planning out next week's work on the overlapping blit extension.

I sent out another version of the DSI series (effectively v6). The bridge driver maintainers seem happy with my core DSI support changes, so hopefully the panel maintainer will be OK with them as well.

24 Jul 2017 12:30am GMT

21 Jul 2017

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Roman Gilg: A small Update

I planned on writing about the Present extension this week, but I'll postpone this since I'm currently strongly absorbed into finding the last rough edges of a first patch I can show off. I then hope to get some feedback on this from other developers in the xorg-devel mailing list.

Another reason is that I stalled my work on the Present extension for now and try to get first my Xwayland code working. My mentor Daniel recommended that to me since the approach I pursued in my work on Present might be more difficult than I first assessed. At least it is something similar to what other way more experienced developers than myself tried in the past and weren't able to do according to Daniel. My idea was to make Present flip per CRTC only, but this would clash with Pixmaps being linked to the whole screen only. There are no Pixmaps only for CRTCs in X.

On the other hand when accepting the restriction of only being able to flip one window at a time my code already works quite good. The flipping is smooth and at least in a short test also improved the frame rate. But the main problem I had and still to some degree have, is that stopping the flipping can fail. The reason seems to be that the Present extension sets always the Screen Pixmap on flips. But when I test my work with KWin, it drives Xwayland in rootless mode, i.e. without a Screen Pixmap and only the Window Pixmaps. I'm currently looking into how to circumvent this in Xwayland. I think it's possible, but I need to look very carefully on how to change the process in order to not forget necessary cleanups on the flipped Pixmaps. I hope though that I'm able to solve these issues already this weekend and then get some feedback on the xorg-devel mailing list.

As always you can find my latest work on my working branch on GitHub.

21 Jul 2017 9:00pm GMT

Bastien Nocera: SECURITY FOR THE SECURITY GODS! SANDBOXING FOR THE SANDBOXING THRONE

@GodTributes took over my title, soz.

Dude, where's my maintainer?

Last year, probably as a distraction from doing anything else, or maybe because I was asked, I started reviewing bugs filed as a result of automated flaw discovery tools (from Coverity to UBSan via fuzzers) being run on gdk-pixbuf.

Apart from the security implications of a good number of those problems, there was also the annoyance of having a busted image file bring down your file manager, your desktop, or even an app that opened a file chooser either because it was broken, or because the image loader for that format didn't check for the sanity of memory allocations.

(I could have added links to Bugzilla entries for each one of the problems above, but that would just make it harder to read)

Two big things happened in gdk-pixbuf 2.36.1, which was used in GNOME 3.24:

But that's just the start. gdk-pixbuf continues getting bug fixes, and we carry on checking for overflows, underflows and just flows, breaks and beats in general.

Programmatic Thumbellina portrait-maker

Picture, if you will, a website making you download garbage files from the Internet, the ROM dump of a NES cartridge that wasn't properly blown on and digital comic books that you definitely definitely paid for.

That's a nice summary of the security bugs foisted upon GNOME in past year or so, even if, thankfully, we were ahead of the curve in terms of fixing those issues (the GStreamer NSF decoder bug was removed in 2013, the comics backend in evince was rewritten over a period of 2 years and committed in March 2017).

Still, 2 pieces of code were running on pretty much every file downloaded, on purpose or not, from the Internet: Tracker's indexers and the file manager's thumbnailers.

Tracker started protecting itself not long after the NSF vulnerability, even if recent versions of GStreamer weren't vulnerable, as we mentioned.

That left the thumbnailers. Some of those are first party, like the gdk-pixbuf, and those offered by core applications (Evince, Videos), written by GNOME developers (yours truly for both epub/mobi and Nintendo DS).

They're all good quality code I'd vouch for (having written or maintained quite a few of them), but they can rely on third-party libraries (say GStreamer, poppler, or libarchive), have naive or insufficiently defensive code (gdk-pixbuf loaders, GStreamer plugins) or, worst of all: THIRD-PARTY EXTENSIONS.

There are external plugins and extensions for image formats in gdk-pixbuf, for video and audio formats in GStreamer, and for thumbnailers pretty much anywhere. We can't control those, but the least we can do when they explode in a wet mess is make sure that the toilet door is closed.

Not even Nicholas Cage can handle this Alcatraz

For GNOME 3.26 (and today in git master), the thumbnailer stall will be doubly bolted by a Bubblewrap sandbox and a seccomp blacklist.

This closes a whole vector of attack for the GNOME Desktop, but doesn't mean we're completely out of the woods. We'll need to carry on maintaining and fixing security bugs in those libraries and tools we depend on, as GStreamer plugin bugs still affect Videos, gdk-pixbuf bugs still affect Photos and Eye Of Gnome, etc.

And there are limits to what those 2 changes can achieve. The sandboxing and syscall blacklisting avoids those thumbnailers writing anything but an image file in PNG format in a specific directory. There's no network, the filename of the original file is hidden and sanitised, but the thumbnailer could still create a crafted PNG file, and the sandbox doesn't work inside a sandbox! So no protection if the application running the thumbnailer is inside Flatpak.

In fine

GNOME 3.26 will have better security for thumbnailers, so you won't "need to delete GNOME Files".

But you'll probably want to be careful with desktops that forked our thumbnailing code, namely Cinnamon and MATE, which don't implement those security features.

The next step for the thumbnailers will be beefing up our protection against greedy thumbnailers (in terms of CPU and memory usage), and sharing the code better between thumbnailers.

Note for later, more images of cute animals.

21 Jul 2017 4:52pm GMT

Jente Hidskes: GSoC part 9: the button stack page

When I discussed this project with my mentor before GSoC, he told me that the button mappings were going to be the most complicated piece. This week I've been working on precisely that and, well, let's just say he wasn't wrong 😉 If you've been following along on GitHub, you're probably thinking that it was a slow week. Indeed, there hasn't been that much activity this week as in previous weeks.

21 Jul 2017 3:35pm GMT

20 Jul 2017

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Robert Foss: Android: NXP i.MX6 on Etnaviv Update

Since the last post a lot work has gone into upstreaming and stabilizing the etnaviv on Android ecosystem. This has involved Android, kernel and Mesa changes. Many of which are available upstream now. A How-To for getting you up and running on an iMX6 dev board is available here.

Improvements

Modifiers support

Modifiers support has been accepted into Mesa, GBM and gbm_gralloc. Modifiers were mentioned in a previous post.

Etnaviv driver support for Android

Patches enabling the etnaviv Mesa driver being built for Android have now landed upstream.

Stability on Android

A number for small stability issues present while running Android on i.MX6 hardware have now been fixed, and the platform is now relatively stable.

Performance diagnostics

We have a decent understanding that the …

20 Jul 2017 10:00pm GMT

17 Jul 2017

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Lennart Poettering: casync Video

Video of my casync Presentation @ kinvolk

The great folks at kinvolk have uploaded a video of my casync presentation at their offices last week.

The slides are available as well.

Enjoy!

17 Jul 2017 10:00pm GMT

Eric Anholt: 2017-07-17

This week's VC5 progress primarily involved rewriting the CLIF-style debug dumps using Intel's gen_decode.c code. Instead of code-generating a bunch of C functions that print out a struct's contents, I now have a little bit of C code that parses a compressed version of the XML at runtime to pick apart the struct and dump it. I've implemented this on VC4 and VC5, and started the Android build debugging process for it.

I also finished fixing the regressions from my VC5 QIR redesign. We now operate on just QPU instructions with sideband information for register allocation, instead of a higher-level IR (that's what NIR is for).

For Raspbian performance, I've been talking with keithp and others about my window-dragging performance issue. My current plan is to implement a little GL extension that gives glBlitFramebuffer() defined behavior for 1:1 overlapping copies, and then use that from X11 to avoid the temporary. That should cut the cost of the window movement in half (not counting the cost of the drawing caused by the expose events).

On the KMS front, I've fixed a regression in dual-display support from my previous tiling work. In the process, I've also written a fix for panning, which was broken even before the tiling work. I've pushed a fix from Boris for a warning on CRTC enable. I've also worked on handling the review feedback from the last DSI series, and started on review of Hans's VC4 CEC support.

17 Jul 2017 12:30am GMT

14 Jul 2017

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Roman Gilg: Difficulties and Success Stories

I provided in the past few weeks some general information about my project and hopefully helpful documentation for the multiple components I'm working with, but I have not yet talked about the work I'm doing on the code itself. Let's change this today.

You can find my work branch on GitHub. It's basically just a personal repository so I can sync my work between my devices, so be warned: The commits are messy as nothing is cleaned up and debug lines as well as temporary TODOs are all over the place. And to be honest up until yesterday my changes didn't accumulate to much. For some reason no picture was displayed in my two test applications, which are Neverball and VLC.

Then on the weekend suddenly the KWin Wayland session wouldn't even launch anymore. Well, at least this issue I was able to fix pretty quickly. But there was still no picture, it seemed the presenting just halted after the first buffer was sent to KWin and without any further messages. Neither the Xwayland server nor the client were unresponsive though. Only today I finally could solve the problem thanks to Daniel's help. The reason for the halt was that I waited on a frame callback from KWin in order to present the next frame. But this never arrived since I hadn't set any damage in the previous frame and KWin then wouldn't signal a new frame. I fixed it by adding a generic damage request for now. After that the picture was depicted and moving nicely.

This is definitively the first big milestone with this project. Until now all I achieved was increasing my own knowledge by reading documentation and poking into the code with debug lines. Ok, I also added some code I hoped would make sense, but besides the compilation there was no feedback through a working prototype to see if my code was going in the right direction or if it was utter bollocks. But after today I can say that my buffer flipping and committing code at least produces a picture. And when looking at the FPS counter in Neverball I would even say, that the buffer flipping replacing all the buffer copies already improved the frame rate.

But to test this I first had to solve another problem: The frame rate was always limited to the 60 Hz of my display. The reason was simple: I called present_event_notify only on the frame callback, but in the Xwayland case we can call it directly after the buffer has been sent to the compositor. The only problem I see with this is that the Present extension assumes, that after a new Pixmap has been flipped the old one can be instantly set ready to be used again for new rendering content. But if the last Pixmap's buffer is still used by the compositor in some way this can lead to tearing.

This hints to a fundamental issue with our approach of using the Present extension in Xwayland. The extension was written with hardware in mind. It assumes a flip happens directly on a screen. There is no intermediate link like a Wayland compositor and if a flip has happened the old buffer is not on the screen anymore. Why do we still try to leverage the Present extension support in Xwayland then? There are two important features of a Wayland compositor we want to have with Xwayland: A tear-free experience for the user and the ability to output a buffer rendered by a direct rendering client on a hardware plane without any copies in between. Every frame is perfect should also remain valid when using some legacy application and that we want no unnecessary copies is simply a question of performance improvements. This is especially important for many of the more demanding games out there, which won't be Wayland native in the short term and some of them maybe never. Both features need the the full Present extension support in the Xwayland DDX. Without it a direct rendering application would still use the Present extension but only with its fallback code path of copying the Pixmap's content. And for a tear-free experience we would at least need to sync these copies to the frame events sent by the Wayland compositor or better directly allow multiple buffers, otherwise we would limit our frame rate. In both cases this means again to increase the Present extension support.

I plan on writing about the Present extension in detail in the next week. So if you didn't fully understand some of the concepts I talked about in this post it could be a good idea to check back.

14 Jul 2017 8:00pm GMT

Jente Hidskes: GSoC part 8: the LED stack page

Originally the plan for this week was to start working on the button mappings, however together with my mentor I decided that it's better to do the LEDs first. This is because I was sure I could finish this in a few days, and button mappings is definitely going to take much longer than that. So, this week I'll run you through the implementation of the LED stack page, and the coming weeks I'll be working on button mappings, profile support and a proper welcome screen, in that order.

14 Jul 2017 8:03am GMT

13 Jul 2017

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Christian Schaller: Fedora Workstation 26 is out

We managed to get Fedora Workstation 26 out the door this week which I am very happy about. In some ways it was far from our most splashy release as it mostly was about us improving on already released features, like improving the Wayland support and improving the Flatpak support in GNOME Software and improving the Qt integration into GNOME through the QtGNOME platform.

One major thing that is fully functional now though and that I have been testing myself extensively is being able to easily install the NVidia binary driver. If you set up the repository from Negativo17 you should be able to go install the Nvidia driver either using dnf on the command line or by searching for NVidia in GNOME Software, and just install it without any further work thanks to all the effort we and NVidia have been putting into things like glvnd. If you have a workstation with an NVidia card I would say that you have a fully functional system at this point without any hacks or file conflicts with Mesa.

For hybrid graphics laptops this also just works, with the only caveat being that your NVidia card will be engaged at all times once you do this, which is not great for your battery life. We are working to improve this, but it will take some time as it both requires us re-architecting some older parts of the stack and get the Nvidia driver updated to support the new solution.

We do plan on listing the NVidia driver in GNOME Software soon without having to manually setup the repository, so soon we will have a very smooth experience where the Nvidia driver is just a click in the Software store away for our users.

Another item of interest here for the discerning user is that if you are on the NVidia binary driver you will be using X and not Wayland. The reason for this as I have stated in previous blog posts too is that we still have some major gaps on the Wayland side when it comes to dealing with the binary NVidia driver. The biggest one here is that XWayland OpenGL applications doesn't work, something the team is hard at work trying to resolve. Also the general infrastructure for dealing with hybrid graphics under Wayland is not there yet, but we are working on that too. We have a top notch team looking at the issues here, including Adam Jackson, Jonas Ådahl and Olivier Fourdan, so I am sure we will close this gap as soon as techically possible.

The other big item we have for Fedora Workstation 26 is going to be the formal launch of the Fleet Commander project, with a fully functional release and proper website. We hope to get that set up for next week, so I will blog more about it then. It is a really cool piece of technology which should make deploying Fedora and RHEL in large orgainzations a lot simpler.

As a sidenote, we received our first HDR capable monitor in the office this week, a Dell Ultrasharp UP2718Q. We have another one already ordered and we should be bringing in more in the next Months. This means we can finally seriously kick off figuring out the plumbing work and update the userland stack to have full HDR support under Linux for both media creation and consumption.

13 Jul 2017 5:52pm GMT

10 Jul 2017

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Dave Airlie (blogspot): radv and the vulkan deferred demo - no fps left behind!

A little while back I took to wondering why one particular demo from the Sascha Willems vulkan demos was a lot slower on radv compared to amdgpu-pro. Like half the speed slow.

I internally titled this my "no fps left behind" project.

The deferred demo, does an offscreen rendering to 3 2048x2048 color attachments and one 2048x2048 D32S8 depth attachment. It then does a rendering using those down to as 1280x720 screen image.

Bas identifed the first cause was probably the fact we were doing clear color eliminations on the offscreen surfaces when we didn't need to. AMD GPU have a delta-color compression feature, and with certain clear values you don't need to do the clear color eliminations step. This brought me back from about 1/2 the FPS to about 3/4, however it took me quite a while to figure out where the rest of the FPS were hiding.

I took a few diversions in my testing, I pulled in some experimental patches to allow the depth buffer to be texture cache compatible, so could bypass the depth decompression pass, however this didn't seem to budge the number too much.

I found a bunch of registers we were setting different values from -pro, nothing too much came of these.

I found some places we were using a compute shader to fill some DCC or htile surfaces to a value, then doing a clear and overwriting the values, not much help.

I noticed the vertex descriptions and buffer attachments on amdgpu-pro were done quite different to how radv does it. With vulkan you have vertex descriptors and bindings, with radv we generate a set of hw descriptors from the combination of both descriptors and bindings. The pro driver uses typed buffer loads in the shader to embed the descriptor contents in the shader, then it only updates the hw descriptors for the buffer bindings. This seems like it might be more efficient, guess what, no help. (LLVM just grew support for typed buffer loads, so we could probably move to this scheme if we wished now).

I dug out some patches that inline all the push constants and some descriptors so our shaders had less overhead, (really helps our meta shaders have less impact), no helps.

I noticed they export the shader results in a different order from the fragment shader, and always at the end. (no help). The vertex shader emits pos first, (no help). The vertex shader uses off exports for unused channels, (no help).

I went on holidays for a week and came back to stare at the traces again, when I my brain finally noticed something I'd missed. When binding the 3 color buffers, the addresses given as the base address were unusual. A surface has a 40-bit address, normally for alignment and tiling the bottom 16-bits are 0, and we shift 8 of those off completely before writing them. This leaves the bottom 8 bits of the base address has should be 0, and the CIK docs from AMD say that. However the pro traces didn't have these at 0. It appears from earlier evergreen/cayman documents these register control some tiling offset bits. After writing a hacky patch to set the values, I managed to get back the rest of the FPS I was missing in the deferred demo. I discussed with AMD developers, and we worked out the addrlib library has an API for working out these values, and it seems that it allows better memory bandwidth utilisation. I've written a patch to try and use these values correctly and sent it out along with the DCC avoidance patch.

Now I'm not sure this will help any real apps, we may not be hitting limitations in that area, and I'm never happy with the benchmarks I run myself. I thought I saw some FPS difference with some madmax scenes, but I might be lying to myself. Once the patches land in mesa I'm sure others will run benchmarks and we can see if there is any use case where they have an effect. The AMD radeonsi OpenGL driver can also do the same tweaks so hopefully there as well there will be some benefit.

Otherwise I can just write this off as making deferred run at equality and removing at least one of the deltas that radv has compared to the pro driver. Some of the other differences I discovered along the way might also have some promise in other scenarios, so I'll keep an eye on them.

Thanks to Bas, Marek and Christian for looking into what the magic meant!

10 Jul 2017 8:08am GMT

Dave Airlie: Migrating to blogsport

Due to lots of people telling me LJ is bad, mm'kay, I've migrated to blogspot.

New blog is/will be here: https://airlied.blogspot.com

10 Jul 2017 6:36am GMT

Dave Airlie (blogspot): Migrating by blog here

I'm moving my blog from LJ to blogspot, because people keep telling me LJ is up to no go, like hacking DNC servers and interfering in elections.

10 Jul 2017 6:29am GMT

Eric Anholt: 2017-07-10

Last week I got permission to open source my work on a Mesa-based VC5 3D driver for BCM7268. You can see the announcement here which I won't replicate on this blog. TWIVC4 is going to be a lot of TWIVC5 from here on out!

I spent the rest of the week working on fixing performance regressions when Raspbian switches from software rendering to to using the vc4 driver without a compositor enabled. The current concern is that window dragging gets slower, and in the worst case can end up with seconds of window dragging queued up behind the motion of the mouse cursor.

Past debugging of mine into how we end up with seconds of window movement queued was fruitless. I suspect it's "each mouse position is streamed out to the window manager, and the window manager naively queues up a window move for each position it gets, rather than reading through all the position events it gets at once and sending a single move for the last one". Instead, I worked on just seeing if we can speed up enough that we don't care.

X11 opaque window dragging is a tough case, because unlike compositors, the contents of the window are stored on the screen (saving gobs of memory, which is important on the Raspberry Pi). When you drag the window, the src and dst regions usually overlap, so we have to be careful to not overwrite src pixels before they've been copied to the dst. In software rasterization, we just arrange the memcpy to happen in the correct order. For GL, we have no such control.

What glamor does instead is make a temporary copy of the src pixels, and then copy from the temp to the dst. This creates dependencies between the screen-to-temp and temp-to-screen jobs, so we flush the rendering job at least twice per copy of the window, not counting any flushes that happen for the rendering of the exposed contents from whatever was underneath the window's old position.

In my tracing, I found that the jobs being generated during window dragging were saying that they could modify any tile on the screen, not just the tiles being affected by the copy (so we read and write each tile on the screen for those jobs). In many paths in glamor we use glScissor() to limit our rendering to some subset of the screen, and this lets the GL keep our jobs trimmed to the appropriate size. However, copies and rectangle fills were scissoring only to the destination drawable's area, which for LXDE was everything but the global menu bar.

I made a small series that looks at small drawing operations and uses glScissor() to clip to their bounds to help tiled renderers like vc4. I was careful to try to limit the impact of these changes on non-vc4 - fast desktop renderers don't want to spend the CPU to compute the bounds of the operations when they don't use the bounds.

It hasn't completely fixed RPi window dragging, but things are a lot smoother. We may find more paths that need this treatment as more people switch to using vc4 for X11 drawing.

10 Jul 2017 12:30am GMT