16 Aug 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Peter Hutterer: libinput's "new" trackpoint acceleration method

This is mostly a request for testing, because I've received zero feedback on the patches that I merged a month ago and libinput 1.12 is due to be out. No comments so far on the RC1 and RC2 either, so... well, maybe this gets a bit broader attention so we can address some things before the release. One can hope.

Required reading for this article: Observations on trackpoint input data and X server pointer acceleration analysis - part 5.

As the blog posts linked above explain, the trackpoint input data is difficult and largely arbitrary between different devices. The previous pointer acceleration libinput had relied on a fixed reporting rate which isn't true at low speeds, so the new acceleration method switches back to velocity-based acceleration. i.e. we convert the input deltas to a speed, then apply the acceleration curve on that. It's not speed, it's pressure, but it doesn't really matter unless you're a stickler for technicalities.

Because basically every trackpoint has different random data ranges not linked to anything easily measurable, libinput's device quirks now support a magic multiplier to scale the trackpoint range into something resembling a sane range. This is basically what we did before with the systemd POINTINGSTICK_CONST_ACCEL property except that we're handling this in libinput now (which is where acceleration is handled, so it kinda makes sense to move it here). There is no good conversion from the previous trackpoint range property to the new multiplier because the range didn't really have any relation to the physical input users expected.

So what does this mean for you? Test the libinput RCs or, better, libinput from master (because it's stable anyway), or from the Fedora COPR and check if the trackpoint works. If not, check the Trackpoint Configuration page and follow the instructions there.

16 Aug 2018 4:47am GMT

13 Aug 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Rodrigo Siqueira: GSoC Final Report

GSoC Final Report


Nothing lasts forever, and this also applies for GSoC projects. In this report, I tried to summarize my experience in the DRI community and my contributions.

Recap the project idea

First, it is important to remember the main subject of my GSoC Project:

The Kernel Mode-Setting (KMS) is a mechanism that enables a process to command the kernel to set a mode (screen resolution, color depth, and rate) which is in a range of values supported by graphics cards and the display screen. Creating a Virtual KMS (VKMS) has benefits. First, it could be used for testing; second, it can be valuable for running X or Wayland on a headless machine enabling the use of GPU. This module is similar to VGEM, and in some ways to VIRTIO. At the moment that VKMS gets mature enough, it will be used to run i-g-t test cases and to automate userspace testing.

I heard about VKMS in the DRM TODO list and decided to apply for GSoC with this project. A very talented developer from Saudi Arabia named Haneen Mohammed had the same idea but applied to the Outreachy program. We worked together with the desire to push as hard as we can the Virtual KMS.

Overcome the steep learning curve

In my opinion, the main reason for the steep learning curve came from the lack of background experience in how the graphics stack works. For example, when I took operating system classes, I studied many things related to schedulers, memory and disk management, and so forth; on the other hand, I had a 10000-foot view of graphics systems. After long hours of studying and coding, I started to understand better how things work. It is incredible all the progress and advances that the DRI developers brought on the last few years! I wish that the new versions of the Operating system books have a whole chapter for this subject.

I still have problems to understand all the mechanisms available in the DRM; however, now I feel confident on how to read the code/documentation and get into the details of the DRM subsystem. I have plans to compile all the knowledge acquired during the project in a series of blog posts.

Contributions

During my work in the GSoC, I send my patches to the DRI mailing list and constantly got feedback to improve my work; as a result, I rework most of my patches. The natural and reliable way to track the contribution is by using "git log -author="Rodrigo Siqueira" in one of the repositories below:

In summary, follows the main patches that I got accepted:

We received two contributions from external people; I reviewed both patches:

I am using IGT to test VKMS, for this reason, I decided to send some contributions to them. I sent a series of patches for fixing GCC warning:

I also sent a patchset with the goal of adding support for forcing a specific module to be used by IGT tests:

As a miscellaneous contribution, I created a series of scripts to automate the workflow of Linux Kernel development. This small project was based on a series of scripts provided by my mentor, and I hope it can be useful for newcomers. Follows the project link:

  1. Kworkflow

Work in Progress

I am glad to say that I accomplished all the tasks initially proposed and I did much more. Now I am working to make VKMS work without vblank. This still a work in progress but I am confident that I can finish it soon. Finally, it is important to highlight that my GSoC participation will finish at the end of August because I traveled for two weeks to join the debconf2018.

Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning - Winston Churchill

GSoC gave me one thing that I was pursuing for a long time: a subsystem in the Linux Kernel that I can be focused for years. I am delighted that I found a place to be focused, and I will keep working on VKMS until It is finished.

Finally, the Brazilian government opened a call for encouraging free software development, and I decided to apply the VKMS project. Last week, I received the great news that I was selected in the first phase and now I am waiting for the final results. If everything ends well for me, I will receive funding to work for 5 months in the VKMS and DRM subsystem.

My huge thanks to…

I received support from many people in the dri-devel channel and mailing list. I want to thanks everybody for all the support and patience.

I want to thanks Daniel Vetter for all the feedback and assistance in the VKMS work. I also want to thanks Gustavo Padovan for all the support that he provided to me (which include some calls with great explanations about the DRM). Finally, I want to thanks Haneen for all the help and great work.

Reference

  1. Use new return type vm_fault_t
  2. Fix the error handling in vkms_init()
  3. Add support to force specific module load

13 Aug 2018 3:00am GMT

09 Aug 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Peter Hutterer: How the 60-evdev.hwdb works

libinput made a design decision early on to use physical reference points wherever possible. So your virtual buttons are X mm high/across, the pointer movement is calculated in mm, etc. Unfortunately this exposed us to a large range of devices that don't bother to provide that information or just give us the wrong information to begin with. Patching the kernel for every device is not feasible so in 2015 the 60-evdev.hwdb was born and it has seen steady updates since. Plenty a libinput bug was fixed by just correcting the device's axis ranges or resolution. To take the magic out of the 60-evdev.hwdb, here's a blog post for your perusal, appreciation or, failing that, shaking a fist at. Note that the below is caller-agnostic, it doesn't matter what userspace stack you use to process your input events.

There are four parts that come together to fix devices: a kernel ioctl and a trifecta of udev rules hwdb entries and a udev builtin.

The kernel's EVIOCSABS ioctl

It all starts with the kernel's struct input_absinfo.


struct input_absinfo {
__s32 value;
__s32 minimum;
__s32 maximum;
__s32 fuzz;
__s32 flat;
__s32 resolution;
};

The three values that matter right now: minimum, maximum and resolution. The "value" is just the most recent value on this axis, ignore fuzz/flat for now. The min/max values simply specify the range of values the device will give you, the resolution how many values per mm you get. Simple example: an x axis given at min 0, max 1000 at a resolution of 10 means your devices is 100mm wide. There is no requirement for min to be 0, btw, and there's no clipping in the kernel so you may get values outside min/max. Anyway, your average touchpad looks like this in evemu-record:


# Event type 3 (EV_ABS)
# Event code 0 (ABS_X)
# Value 2572
# Min 1024
# Max 5112
# Fuzz 0
# Flat 0
# Resolution 41
# Event code 1 (ABS_Y)
# Value 4697
# Min 2024
# Max 4832
# Fuzz 0
# Flat 0
# Resolution 37

This is the information returned by the EVIOCGABS ioctl (EVdev IOCtl Get ABS). It is usually run once on device init by any process handling evdev device nodes.

Because plenty of devices don't announce the correct ranges or resolution, the kernel provides the EVIOCSABS ioctl (EVdev IOCtl Set ABS). This allows overwriting the in-kernel struct with new values for min/max/fuzz/flat/resolution, processes that query the device later will get the updated ranges.

udev rules, hwdb and builtins

The kernel has no notification mechanism for updated axis ranges so the ioctl must be applied before any process opens the device. This effectively means it must be applied by a udev rule. udev rules are a bit limited in what they can do, so if we need to call an ioctl, we need to run a program. And while udev rules can do matching, the hwdb is easier to edit and maintain. So the pieces we have is: a hwdb that knows when to change (and the values), a udev program to apply the values and a udev rule to tie those two together.

In our case the rule is 60-evdev.rules. It checks the 60-evdev.hwdb for matching entries [1], then invokes the udev-builtin-keyboard if any matching entries are found. That builtin parses the udev properties assigned by the hwdb and converts them into EVIOCSABS ioctl calls. These three pieces need to agree on each other's formats - the udev rule and hwdb agree on the matches and the hwdb and the builtin agree on the property names and value format.

By itself, the hwdb itself has no specific format beyond this:


some-match-that-identifies-a-device
PROPERTY_NAME=value
OTHER_NAME=othervalue

But since we want to match for specific use-cases, our udev rule assembles several specific match lines. Have a look at 60-evdev.rules again, the last rule in there assembles a string in the form of "evdev:name:the device name:content of /sys/class/dmi/id/modalias". So your hwdb entry could look like this:


evdev:name:My Touchpad Name:dmi:*svnDellInc*
EVDEV_ABS_00=0:1:3

If the name matches and you're on a Dell system, the device gets the EVDEV_ABS_00 property assigned. The "evdev:" prefix in the match line is merely to distinguish from other match rules to avoid false positives. It can be anything, libinput unsurprisingly used "libinput:" for its properties.

The last part now is understanding what EVDEV_ABS_00 means. It's a fixed string with the axis number as hex number - 0x00 is ABS_X. And the values afterwards are simply min, max, resolution, fuzz, flat, in that order. So the above example would set min/max to 0:1 and resolution to 3 (not very useful, I admit).

Trailing bits can be skipped altogether and bits that don't need overriding can be skipped as well provided the colons are in place. So the common use-case of overriding a touchpad's x/y resolution looks like this:


evdev:name:My Touchpad Name:dmi:*svnDellInc*
EVDEV_ABS_00=::30
EVDEV_ABS_01=::20
EVDEV_ABS_35=::30
EVDEV_ABS_36=::20

0x00 and 0x01 are ABS_X and ABS_Y, so we're setting those to 30 units/mm and 20 units/mm, respectively. And if the device is multitouch capable we also need to set ABS_MT_POSITION_X and ABS_MT_POSITION_Y to the same resolution values. The min/max ranges for all axes are left as-is.

The most confusing part is usually: the hwdb uses a binary database that needs updating whenever the hwdb entries change. A call to systemd-hwdb update does that job.

So with all the pieces in place, let's see what happens when the kernel tells udev about the device:

Once you understand how the various bits fit together it should be quite easy to understand what happens. Then the remainder is just adding hwdb entries where necessary but the touchpad-edge-detector tool is useful for figuring those out.

[1] Not technically correct, the udev rule merely calls the hwdb builtin which searches through all hwdb entries. It doesn't matter which file the entries are in.

09 Aug 2018 2:17am GMT

01 Aug 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Christian Schaller: Supporting developers on Patreon (and similar)

For some time now I been supporting two Linux developers on patreon. Namely Ryan Gordon of Linux game porting and SDL development fame and Tanu Kaskinen who is a lead developer on PulseAudio these days.

One of the things I often think about is how we can enable more people to make a living from working on the Linux desktop and related technologies. If your reading my blog there is a good chance that you are enabling people to make a living on working on the Linux desktop by paying for RHEL Workstation subscriptions through your work. So a big thank you for that. The fact that Red Hat has paying customers for our desktop products is critical in terms of our ability to do so much of the maintenance and development work we do around the Linux Desktop and Linux graphics stack.

That said I do feel we need more venues than just employment by companies such as Red Hat and this is where I would love to see more people supporting their favourite projects and developers through for instance Patreon. Because unlike one of funding campaigns repeat crowdfunding like Patreon can give developers predictable income, which means they don't have to worry about how to pay their rent or how to feed their kids.

So in terms of the two Patreons I support Ryan is probably the closest to being able to rely on it for his livelihood, but of course more Patreon supporters will enable Ryan to be even less reliant on payments from game makers. And Tanu's patreon income at the moment is helping him to spend quite a bit of time on PulseAudio, but it is definitely not providing him with a living income. So if you are reading this I strongly recommend that you support Ryan Gordon and Tanu Kaskinen on Patreon. You don't need to pledge a lot, I think in general it is in fact better to have many people pledging 10 dollars a Month than a few pledging hundreds, because the impact of one person coming or going is thus a lot less. And of course this is not just limited to Ryan and Tanu, search around and see if any projects or developers you personally care deeply about are using crowdfunding and support them, because if more of us did so then more people would be able to make a living of developing our favourite open source software.

Update: Seems I wasn't the only one thinking about this, Flatpak announced today that application devs can put their crowdfunding information into their flatpaks and it will be advertised in GNOME Software.

01 Aug 2018 2:32pm GMT

Dave Airlie (blogspot): virgl - exposes GLES3.1/3.2 and GL4.3

I'd had a bit of a break from adding feature to virgl while I was working on radv, but recently Google and Collabora have started to invest in virgl as a solution. A number of developers from both companies have joined the project.

This meant trying to get virgl to pass their dEQP suite and adding support for newer GL/GLES feature levels. They also have a goal for the renderer to run on a host GLES implementation whereas it currently only ran on a host GL.

Over the past few months I've worked with the group to add support for all the necessary features needed for guest GLES3.1 support (for them) and GL4.3 (for me).

The feature list was roughly:
tessellation shaders
fp64 support
ARB_gpu_shader5 support
Shader buffer objects
Shader image objects
Compute shaders
Copy Image
Texture views

With this list implemented we achieved GL4.3 and GLES3.1.

However Marek@AMD did some work on exposing ASTC for gallium drivers,
and with some extra work on EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch, we now expose GLES3.2.

There was also plenty of work done on avoiding crashes from rogue guests (rewrote the whole feature/capability bit handling), and lots of bug fixes. There are still ongoing fixes to finish the dEQP tests, but it looks like all the feature work should be landed now.

What next?

Well there is one big problem facing virgl in exposing GL 4.4. GL_ARB_buffer_storage requires exposing coherent buffer memory, and with the virgl architecture, we currently don't have a way to map the pages behind a host GL buffer mapping into a guest GL buffer mapping in order to achieve coherency. This is going to require some thought and it may even require exposing some new GL extensions to export a buffer to a dma-buf.

There has also been a GSoC student Nathan working on vulkan/virgl support, he's made some iniital progess, however vulkan also has requirements on coherent memory so that tricky problems needs to be solved.

Thanks again to all the contributors to the virgl project.

01 Aug 2018 4:26am GMT

Peter Hutterer: A Fedora COPR for libinput git master

To make testing libinput git master easier, I set up a whot/libinput-git Fedora COPR yesterday. This repo gets the push triggers directly from GitLab so it will rebuild with whatever is currently on git master.

To use the COPR, simply run:


sudo dnf copr enable whot/libinput-git
sudo dnf upgrade libinput

This will give you the libinput package from git. It'll have a date/time/git sha based NVR, e.g. libinput-1.11.901-201807310551git22faa97.fc28.x86_64. Easy to spot at least.

To revert back to the regular Fedora package run:


sudo dnf copr disable whot/libinput-git
sudo dnf distro-sync "libinput-*"

Disclaimer: This is an automated build so not every package is tested. I'm running git master exclusively (from a a ninja install) and I don't push to master unless the test suite succeeds. So the risk for ending up with a broken system is low.

On that note: if you are maintaining a similar repo for other distributions and would like me to add a push trigger in GitLab for automatic rebuilds, let me know.

01 Aug 2018 1:07am GMT

31 Jul 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Robert Foss: kms_swrast: A hardware-backed graphics driver

Stack overview

Let's start with having a look at a high level overview of what the graphics stack looks like.

Alt text

Before digging too much further into this, lets cover some terminology.

DRM - Direct Rendering Manager - is the Linux kernel graphics subsystem, which contains all of the graphics drivers and does all of the interfacing with hardware.
The DRM subsystem implements the KMS - kernel mode setting - API.

Mode setting is essentially configuring output settings like resolution for the displays that are being used. And doing it using the kernel means that userspace doesn't need access to setting these things directly.

Alt text

The DRM subsystem talks to the hardware and Mesa is used by applications through the APIs it implements. APIs like OpenGL, OpenGL ES, Vulkan, etc. All …

31 Jul 2018 7:14am GMT

30 Jul 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Peter Hutterer: libinput now has ReadTheDocs-style documentation

libinput's documentation started out as doxygen of the developer API - they were the main target 4 years ago. Over time, more and more extra documentation was added and now most of it is aimed at users (for self-debugging and troubleshooting or just to explain concepts and features). Unfortunately, with doxygen this all ends up in the "Related Pages". The developer API documentation itself became a less important part, by now all the major compositors have libinput support and it doesn't change much. So while it needs to be there, most of the traffic goes to the user documentation (I think, it's not like I'm running stats).

Something more suited for prose-style docs was needed. I prefer the RTD look so last week I converted most of the libinput documentation into RST format and it's now built with sphinx and the RTD theme. Same URL as before: http://wayland.freedesktop.org/libinput/doc/latest/.

The biggest difference is that the Developer API Documentation (still doxygen) is now at http://wayland.freedesktop.org/libinput/doc/latest/api/, (i.e. add /api/ to the link). If you're programming against libinput's API (e.g. because you're writing a compositor), that's where you need to go.

It's still basically the same content as before, I'll be tidying things up and adding to it over the next few weeks. Hopefully without breaking existing links. There is probably detritus from the doxygen → rst change floating around, I'll be fixing that too. If you want to help out please don't hesitate, I'll do my best to be quick to review any merge requests.

30 Jul 2018 4:16am GMT

Eric Anholt: 2018-07-30

I made some progress on GMP this week, getting jobs to run successfully if I enable regions in the GMP but never disable them. I need to do some more work on BO lifetime management if I want to clear disallowed regions back out of the GMP.

I did some more conformance debug, fixing one of the intermittent issues in GLES3 (The same rendering-versus-VS-texturing synchronization bug that broke glmark2 terrain on vc4). GLES3 conformance is now at GLES2 status plus one new set of intermittent issues. Another fix I made (not misusing HW semaphores) unfortunately doesn't seem to have improved anything.

I had a few performance ideas left over from last week, and built them on Monday (fixed extra flushing due to glClear() after drawing, or the GFHX-1461 workaround, avoid storing buffers that had all their drawing masked out). Performance of simple apps was still astoundingly slow, so I did some more poking around and determined that my V3D HW is actually running at 37 Mhz. My other board runs at 27Mhz. Now I know why my conformance runs have been taking so long! Unfortunately, Broadcom STB doesn't support clock control from Linux, so I won't really be able to do performance work on this driver until I can get a SW stack under me that can set the right clock speeds.

Finally, I cleaned up and merged my CLIF dumping code, so V3D can now generate simple traces that can be replayed by the software simulator or on FPGAs to debug lockups. It's going to take a bit more work to make it so that BO addresses in uniforms work, which is needed for texturing, UBOs, and spilling.

30 Jul 2018 12:30am GMT

29 Jul 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Lennart Poettering: ASG! 2018 CfP Closes TODAY

The All Systems Go! 2018 Call for Participation Closes TODAY!

The Call for Participation (CFP) for All Systems Go! 2018 will close TODAY, on 30th of July! We'd like to invite you to submit your proposals for consideration to the CFP submission site quickly!

ASG image

All Systems Go! is everybody's favourite low-level Userspace Linux conference, taking place in Berlin, Germany in September 28-30, 2018.

For more information please visit our conference website!

29 Jul 2018 10:00pm GMT

Daniel Stone: Introducing freedesktop.org GitLab

This is quite a long post. The executive summary is that freedesktop.org now hosts an instance of GitLab, which is generally available and now our preferred platform for hosting going forward. We think it offers a vastly better service, and we needed to do it in order to offer the projects we host the modern workflows they have been asking for.

In parallel, we're working on making our governance, including policies, processes and decision making, much more transparent.

Some history

Founded by Havoc Pennington in 2000, freedesktop.org is now old enough to vote. From the initial development of the cross-desktop XDG specs, to supporting critical infrastructure such as NetworkManager, and now as the home to open-source graphics development (the kernel DRM tree, Mesa, Wayland, X.Org, and more), it's long been a good home to a lot of good work.

We don't provide day-to-day technical direction or enforce set rules: it's a very loose collection of projects which we each trust to do their own thing, some with nothing in common but where they're hosted.

Unfortunately, that hosting hasn't really grown up a lot since the turn of the millennium. Our account system was forked (and subsequently heavily hacked) from Debian's old LDAP-based system in 2004. Everyone needing direct Git commit access to projects, or the ability to upload to web space, has to file a bug in Bugzilla, where after a trip through the project maintainer, eventually an admin will get around to pulling their SSH and GPG (!) keys and adding an account by hand.

Similarly, creating or reconfiguring a Git repository also requires manual admin intervention, where on request one of us will SSH into the Git server and do whatever is required. Beyond Git and cgit for viewing, we provide Bugzilla for issue tracking, Mailman and Patchwork for code review and discussion, and ikiwiki for tracking. For our sins, we also have an FTP server running somewhere. None of these services are really integrated with each other; separate accounts and separate sets of permissions are required.

Maintaining these disparate services is a burden on both admins and projects. Projects are frequently blocked on admins adding users and changing their SSH keys, changing Git hooks, adding people to Patchwork, manually applying more duct tape to the integration between these services, and fixing the duct tape when it breaks (which is surprisingly often). As a volunteer admin for the service, doing these kinds of things is not exactly the reason we get out of bed in the morning; it also consumes so much time treading water that we haven't been able to enable new features and workflows for the projects we host.

Seeking better workflows

As of writing, around one third of the non-dormant projects on fd.o have at some point migrated their development elsewhere; mostly to GitHub. Sometimes this was because the other sites were a more natural home (e.g. to sibling projects), and sometimes just because they offered a better workflow (integration between issue tracking and commits, web-based code review, etc). Other projects which would have found fd.o a natural home have gone straight to hosting externally, though they may use some of our services - particularly mailing lists.

Not everyone wants to make use of these features, and not everyone will. For example, the kernel might well never move away from email for issue tracking and code review. But the evidence shows us that many others do want to, and our platform will be a non-starter for them unless we provide the services they want.

A bit over three years ago, I set up an instance of Phabricator at Collabora to replace our mix of Bugzilla, Redmine, Trac, and JIRA. It was a great fit for how we worked internally, and upstream seemed like a good fit too; though they were laser-focused on their usecases, their extremely solid data storage and processing model made it quite easy to extend, and projects like MediaWiki, Haskell, LLVM and more were beginning to switch over to use it as their tracker. I set up an instance on fd.o, and we started to use it for a couple of trial projects: some issue tracking and code review for Wayland and Weston, development of PiTiVi, and so on.

The first point we seriously discussed it more widely was at XDC 2016 in Helsinki, where Eric Anholt gave a talk about our broken infrastructure, cleverly disguised as something about test suites. It became clear that we had wide interest in and support for better infrastructure, though with some reservation about particular workflows. There was quite a bit of hallway discussion afterwards, as Eric and Adam Jackson in particular tried out Phabricator and gave some really good feedback on its usability. At that point, it was clear that some fairly major UI changes were required to make it usable for our needs, especially for drive-by contributors and new users.

Last year, GNOME went through a similar process. With Carlos and some of the other members being more familiar with GitLab, myself and Emmanuele Bassi made the case for using Phabricator, based on our experiences with it at Collabora and Endless respectively. At the time, our view was that whilst GitLab's code review was better, the issue tracking (being much like GitHub's) would not really scale to our needs. This was mostly based on having last evaluated GitLab during the 8.x series; whilst the discussions were going on, GitLab were making giant strides in issue tracking throughout 9.x.

With GitLab coming up to par on issue tracking, both Emmanuele and I ended up fully supporting GNOME's decision to base their infrastructure on GitLab. The UI changes required to Phabricator were not really tractable for the resources we had, the code review was and will always be fundamentally unsuitable being based around the Subversion-like model of reviewing large branches in one go, and upstream were also beginning to move to a much more closed community model.

gitlab.freedesktop.org

By contrast, one of the things which really impressed us about GitLab was how openly they worked, and how open they were to collaboration. Early on in GNOME's journey to GitLab, they dropped their old CLA to replace it with a DCO, and Eliran Mesika from GitLab's partnership team came to GUADEC to listen and understand how GNOME worked and what they needed from GitLab. Unfortunately this was too early in the process for us, but Robert McQueen later introduced us, and Eliran and I started talking about how they could help freedesktop.org.

One of our bigger issues was infrastructure. Not only were our services getting long in the tooth, but so were the machines they ran on. In order to stand up a large new service, we'd need new physical machines, but a fleet of new machines was beyond the admin time we had. It also didn't solve issues such as everyone's favourite: half of Europe can't route to fd.o for half an hour most mornings due to obscure network issues with our host we've had no success diagnosing or fixing.

GitLab Inc. listened to our predicament and suggested a solution to help us: that they would sponsor our hosting on Google Cloud Platform for an initial period to get us on our feet. This involves us running the completely open-source GitLab Community Edition on infrastructure we control ourselves, whilst freeing us from having to worry about failing and full disks or creaking networks. (As with GNOME, we politely declined the offer of a license to the pay-for GitLab Enterprise Edition; we wanted to be fully in control of our infrastructure, and on a level playing field with the rest of the open-source community.)

They have also offered us support, from helping a cloud idiot understand how to deploy and maintain services on Kubernetes, to taking the time to listen and understand our workflows and improve GitLab for our uses. Much of the fruit of this is already visible in GitLab through feedback from us and GNOME, though there is always more to come. In particular, one area we're looking at is integration with mailing lists and placing tags in commit messages, so developers used to mail-based workflows can continue to consume the firehose through email, rather than being required to use the web UI for everything.

Last Christmas, we gave ourselves the present of standing up gitlab.freedesktop.org on GCP, and set about gradually making it usable and maintainable for our projects. Our first hosted project was Panfrost, who were running on either non-free services or non-collaborative hosted services. We wanted to help them out by getting them on to fd.o, but they didn't want to use the services we had at the time, and we didn't want to add new projects to those services anyway.

Over time, as we stabilised the deployment and fleshed out the feature set, we added a few smaller projects, who understood the experimental nature and gave us space to make some mistakes, have some down time, and helped us smooth out the rough edges. Some of the blocker here was migrating bugs: though we reused GNOME's bztogl script, we needed some adjustments for our different setups, as well as various bugfixes.

Not long ago, we migrated Mesa's repository hosting as well as Wayland and Weston for both repository tracking and issue tracking which are our biggest projects to date.

What we offer to projects

With GitLab, we offer everything you would expect from gitlab.com (their hosted offering), or everything you would expect from GitHub with the usual external services such as Travis CI. This includes issue tracking integrated with repository management (close issues by pushing), merge requests with online review and merge, a comprehensive CI suite with shared runners available to all, custom sites built with whatever toolchain you like, external web hooks to integrate with other services, and a well-documented stable API which allows you to use external clients like git lab.

In theory, we've always provided most of the above services. Most of these - if you ignore the lack of integration between them - were more or less fine for projects running their own standalone infrastructure. But they didn't scale to something like fd.o, where we have a very disparate family of projects sharing little in common, least of all common infrastructure and practices. For example, we did have a Jenkins deployment for a while, but it became very clear very early that this did not scale out to fd.o: it was impossible for us to empower projects to run their own CI without fatally compromising security.

Anyone familiar with the long wait for an admin to add an account or change an SSH key will be relieved to hear that this is no longer. Anyone can make an account on our GitLab instance using an email address and password, or with trusted external identity providers (currently Google, gitlab.com, GitHub, or Twitter) rather than having another username and password. We delegate permission management to project owners: if you want to give someone commit rights to your project, go right ahead. No need to wait for us.

We also support such incredible leading-edge security features as two-factor TOTP authentication for your account, Recaptcha to protect against spammers, and ways of deleting spam which don't involve an admin sighing into a SQL console for half an hour, trying to not accidentally delete all the content.

Having an integrated CI system allows our projects to run test pipelines on merge requests, giving people fast feedback about any required changes without human intervention, and making sure distcheck works all the time, rather than just the week before release. We can capture and store logs, binaries and more as artifacts.

The same powerful system is also the engine for GitLab Pages: you can use static site generators like Jekyll and Hugo, or have a very spartan, hand-written site but also host auto-generated documentation. The choice is yours: running everything in (largely) isolated containers means that you can again do whatever you like with your own sites, without having to ask admins to set up some duct-taped triggers from Git repositories, then ask them to fix it when they've upgraded Python and everything has mysteriously stopped working.

Migration to GitLab, and legacy services

Now that we have a decent and battle-tested service to offer, we can look to what this means for our other services.

Phabricator will be decommissioned immediately; a read-only archive will be taken of public issues and code reviews and maintained as static pages forever, and a database dump will also be kept. But we do not plan to bring this service back, as all the projects using it have already migrated away from it.

Similarly, Jenkins has already been decommissioned and deactivated some time ago.

Whilst we are encouraging projects to migrate their issue tracking away from Bugzilla and helping those who do, we realise a lot of projects have built their workflows around Bugzilla. We will continue to maintain our Bugzilla installation and support existing projects with its use, though we are not offering Bugzilla to new projects anymore, and over the long term would like to see Bugzilla eventually retired.

Patchwork (already currently maintained by Intel for their KMS and Mesa work) is in the same boat, complicated by the fact that the kernel might never move away from patches carved into stone tablets.

Hopefully it goes without saying that our mailing lists are going to be long-lived, even if better issue tracking and code review does mean they're a little less-trafficked than before.

Perhaps most importantly, we have anongit and cgit. anongit is not provided by GitLab, as they rightly prefer to serve repositories over https. Given that, for all existing projects we are maintaining anongit.fd.o as a read-only mirror of GitLab; there are far too many distributions, build scripts, and users out there with anongit URIs to discontinue the service. Over time we will encourage these downstreams to move to HTTPS to lessen the pressure, but this will continue to live for quite some time. Having cgit live alongside anongit is fairly painless, so we will keep it running whilst it isn't a burden.

Lastly, annarchy.fd.o (aka people.fd.o) is currently offered as a general-purpose shell host. People use this to manage their Git repositories on people.fd.o and their files publicly served there. Since it is also the primary web host for most projects, both people and scripts use it to deploy files to sites. Some people use it for random personal file storage, to run various scripts and even as a personal IRC host. We are trying to transition these people away from using annarchy for this, as it is difficult for us to provide totally arbitrary resources to everyone who has at one point had an account with one of our member projects. Running a source of lots of IRC traffic is also a good way to make yourself deeply unpopular with many hosts.

Migrating your projects

After being iterated and fleshed out, we are happy to offer to migrate all the projects. For each project, we will ask you to file an issue using the migration template. This gives you a checklist with all the information we need to migrate your GitLab repositories, as well as your existing Bugzilla bugs.

Every user with a freedesktop.org SSH account already has an account created for them on GitLab, with access to the same groups. In order to recover access to the migrated accounts, you can request a password-reset link by entering the email address you signed up with into the 'forgotten password' box on the GitLab front page.

More information is available on the freedesktop GitLab wiki, and of course the admins are happy to help if you have any problems with this. The usual failure mode is that your email address has changed since you signed up: we've had one user who needed it changed as they were still using a Yahoo! mail address.

Governance and process

Away from technical issues, we're also looking to inject a lot more transparency into our processes. For instance, why do we host kernel graphics development, but not new filesystems? What do we look for (both good and bad), and why is that? What is freedesktop.org even for, and who is it serving?

This has just been folk knowledge for some time; passed on by oral legend over IRC as verbal errata to out-of-date wiki pages. Just as with technical issues, this is not healthy for anyone: it's more difficult for people to get involved and give us the help we so clearly need, it's more difficult for our community to find out what they can expect from us and how we can help them, and it's impossible for anyone to measure how good a job we're actually doing.

One of the reasons we haven't done a great job at this is because just keeping the Rube Goldberg machine of our infrastructure running exhausts basically all the time we have to deal with fd.o. The time we spend changing someone's SSH keys by hand, or debugging a Git post-receive hook, is time we're not spending on the care and feeding of our community.

We've spent the past couple of years paying down our technical debt, and the community equivalent thereof. Our infrastructure is much less error-prone than it was: we've gone from fighting fires to being able to prepare the new GitLab infrastructure and spend time shepherding projects through it. Now that we have a fair few projects on GitLab and they've been able to serve themselves, we've been able to take some time for community issues.

Writing down our processes is still a work in progress, but something we've made a little more headway on is governance. Currently fd.o's governance is myself, Keith and Tollef discussing things and coming to some kind of conclusion. Sometimes that's in recorded public fora, sometimes over email with searchable archives, sometimes just over IRC message or verbally with no public record of what happened.

Given that there's a huge overlap between our mission and that of the X.Org Foundation (which is a lot more than just X11!), one idea we're exploring is to bring fd.o under the Foundation's oversight, with clear responsibility, accountability, and delegated roles. The combination of the two should give our community much more insight into what we're doing and why - as well as, crucially, the chance to influence it.

Of course, this is all conditional on fd.o speaking to our member projects, and the Foundation speaking to its individual members, and getting wide agreement. There will be a lot of tuning required - not least, the Foundation's bylaws would need a change which needs a formal vote from the membership - but this at least seems like a promising avenue.

29 Jul 2018 3:39pm GMT

26 Jul 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Christian Schaller: Some thoughts on smart home technology

A couple of Months ago we visited IKEA and saw the IKEA Trådfri smart lighting system. Since it was relatively cheap we decided to buy their starter pack and enough bulbs to make the recessed lights in our living rooms smartlight. I got it up and running and had some fun switching the light hue and turning the lights on and off from my phone.
A bit later I got a Google Assistant speaker at Google I/O and the system suddenly became somewhat more useful as I could control the lights by calling out to the google assistant. I was also able to connect our AC system thermostats to the google assistant so we could change the room temperature using voice commands.
As a result of this I ended up reading up on smart home technologies and found that my IKEA hub and bulbs was conforming to the ZigBee standard and that I should be able to buy further Zigbee compatible devices from other vendors to extend it. So I ordered a Zigbee compatible in-wall light switch from GE and I also ordered a Zigbee compatible in-ceiling switch from a company called Nue through Amazon. Once I got these home and tried to get them up and running I found that my understanding was flawed as there are two Zigbee standards, the older Zigbee HA and the newer Zigbee LightLink. The IKEA stuff is Zigbee LightLink while at least the GE switch was Zigbee HA and thus the IKEA hub could not control it. So I ended up ordering a Samsung SmartThings hub which supports Zigbee HA, Zigbee LL and the competing system called Z-Wave. At which point I got both my IKEA lights and my two devices working with it.
In the meantime I had also gotten myself a Google Assistant compatible portable aircon from FrigidAire for my home office (no part of main house) and a Google Assistant compatible fire alarm from Nest for the same office space.

So having lived in my new smarter home for a while now what are my conclusions? Well first of all that we still have some way to go before this is truly seamless and obvious. I consider myself a fairly technical person, but it still took quite a bit of googling for me to be able to get everything working. Secondly a lot of the smart home stuff feel a bit gimmicky in the end. For instance the Frigidaire portable air conditioner integration with the Google Assistant is more annoying than useful. It basically requires me to start by asking to talk to Frigidaire and then listen to a ton of crap before I can even start trying to do anything. As for the lights we do actually turn them on and off quite a bit using the voice commands (at least I try to until I realize my wife has disconnected the google assistant in order to use its cable to charge her phone :). I also realized that while installing and buying the in-wall switches are a bit more costly and complicated than just getting some smart bulbs it does work a lot better as I can then control the lights using both voice and switch. Because the smart bulbs can not be turned on using voice if you have a normal switch turned off (obviously, but not something I thought about before buying). So getting something like the IKEA bulbs is a nice and cheap way to try this stuff out I don't see it as our long term solution here. The thermostat we haven't controlled or queried once since I did the initial testing of its connection to Google assistant.

All in all I have to say that the smart home tech is cute, but it is far from being essential. I might end up putting in more wall switches for the light going forward, but apart from that, having smart home support in a device is not going to drive my purchasing decisions. Maybe as the tech matures and becomes more mainstream it will also become more useful, but as it stands it mostly solves first world problems (although of course there are real gains here for various accessibility situations).

26 Jul 2018 7:40pm GMT

25 Jul 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Rodrigo Siqueira: Talk about VKMS accepted in linuxdev-br

foo

Recently, I submitted a talk about VKMS in a conference named Linux Developer Conference Brazil (linuxdev-br)[1] and got accepted [2]. I am delighted with this opportunity, since I attended linuxdev-br 2017 as a complete newbie and the conference provided me the required inputs to start working in the Kernel. Also, I had the opportunity to talk with great kernel developers and learn a little bit more with them. As a result, I have a lot of affection for this conference; presenting at linuxdev-br 2018 means a lot to me.

In the talk, I will explain how I started with Linux Kernel and got accepted in the GSoC 2018. Following that, I want to provide an overview of the DRM subsystem and finish with the explanation of the VKMS. I want to detail some of the features that I developed, and I will try to explain the features developed by Haneen. As soon as I have the presentation done, I will post it here.

Reference

  1. Linux Developer Conference Brazil
  2. Linuxdev-br speakers

25 Jul 2018 3:00am GMT

Peter Hutterer: Why it's not a good idea to handle evdev directly

Gather round children, it's story time. Especially for you children who lurk on /r/linux and think you may learn something there. Today, I'll tell you a horror story. The one where we convert kernel input events into touchpad events, with the subtle subtitle of "friends don't let friends handle evdev events".

The question put forward is "why do we need libinput at all", when, as frequently suggested on the usual websites, it's sufficient to just read evdev data and there's really no need for libinput. That is of course true. You can use evdev events from the kernel directly. Did you know that the events the kernel gives you are absolute coordinates? And that not all touchpads have buttons? Or that some touchpads have specific event sequences that need to be filtered? No? Well, boy, are you in for a few surprises! Anyway, let's go and handle evdev events ourselves and write our own libmyinput.

How do we know something is a touchpad? Well, we look at the exposed evdev bits. We need ABS_X, ABS_Y and BTN_TOOL_FINGER but don't want INPUT_PROP_DIRECT. If the latter bit is set then we have a touchscreen (probably). We don't actually care about buttons here, that comes later. ABS_X and ABS_Y give us device-absolute coordinates. On touch down you get the evdev frame of "a finger is down at x/y device units from the top-left". As you move around, you get the x/y coordinate updates. The data itself is exactly the same as you would get from a touchscreen, but we know it's a touchpad because we queried the other bits at startup. So your first job is to convert the absolute x/y coordinates to deltas by subtracting the previous position.

Touchpads have different resolutions for x and y so a delta of 10/10 does not mean it's a 45-degree movement. Better check with the resolution to convert this to physical distances to be on the safe side. Oh, btw, the axes aren't reliable. The min/max ranges and the resolutions are wrong on a large number of touchpads. Luckily systemd fixes this for you with the 60-evdev.hwdb. But I should probably note that hwdb only exists because of libinput... Either way, you don't have to care about it because the road's already paved. You're welcome.

Oh wait, you do have to care a little because there are touchpads (e.g. HP Stream 11, ZBook Studio G3, ...) where bits are missing or wrong. So you better write a device database that tells you when you have correct the evdev bits. You could implement this as config option but that's just saying "I know what's wrong here, I know how to fix it but I'm still going to make you google for it and edit a local configuration file to make it work". You could treat your users this way, but you really shouldn't.

As you're happily processing your deltas, you notice that on some touchpads you get motion before you touch the touchpad. Ooops, we need a way to tell whether a finger is down. Luckily the kernel gives you BTN_TOUCH for that event, so you switch your implementation to only calculate deltas when BTN_TOUCH is set. But then you realise that is effectively a hardcoded threshold in the kernel and does not match a lot of devices. Some devices require too-hard finger pressure to trigger BTN_TOUCH, others send it on super-light pressure or even while hovering. After grinding some enamel away you find that many touchpads give you ABS_PRESSURE. Awesome, let's make touches pressure-based instead. Let's use a threshold, no, I mean a device-specific threshold (because if two touchpads would be the same the universe will stop doing whatever a universe does, I clearly haven't thought this through). Luckily we already have the device database so we just add the thresholds there.

Oh, if you want this to run on a Apple touchpad better implement touch size handling (ABS_MT_TOUCH_MAJOR/ABS_MT_TOUCH_MINOR). These axes give you the size of the touching ellipse which is great. Except that the value is just an arbitrary number range that have no reflection to physical properties, so better update your database so you can add those thresholds.

Ok, now we have single-finger handling in our libnotinput. Let's add some sophisticated touchpad features like button clicks. Buttons are easy, the kernel gives us BTN_LEFT and BTN_RIGHT and, if you're lucky, BTN_MIDDLE. Unless you have a clickpad of course in which case you only ever get BTN_LEFT because the whole touchpad can be depressed (much like you, if you continue writing your own evdev handling). Those clickpads are in the majority of laptops these days, so we have to deal with them. The two approaches we have are "software button areas" and "clickfinger". The former detects where your finger is when you push the touchpad down - if it's in the bottom right corner we convert the kernel's BTN_LEFT to a BTN_RIGHT and pass that on. Decide how big the buttons will be (note: some touchpads that need software buttons are only 50mm high, others exceed 100mm height). Whatever size you choose, it's an invisible line on the touchpad. Do you know yet how you will handle a finger that moves from outside the button are into the button area before the click? Or the other way round? Maybe add this to your todo list for fixing later.

Maybe "clickfinger" is easier? It counts how many fingers are on the touchpad when clicking (1 finger == left click, 2 fingers == right click, 3 fingers == middle click). Much easier, except that so far we only handle one finger. The easy fix is to use BTN_TOOL_DOUBLETAP and BTN_TOOL_TRIPLETAP which are bitflags that tell you when a second/third finger are down. Add that to your libthisisnotlibinput. Coincidentally, users often click with their thumb while moving. So you have one finger moving the pointer, then a thumb click. Two fingers down but the user doesn't perceive it as such, this should be a left click. Oops, we don't actually know where the second finger is.

Let's switch our libstillnotlibinput to use ABS_MT_POSITION_X and ABS_MT_POSITION_Y because that gives us per-finger position information (once you understand how the kernel's MT protocol slots work). And when I say "switch" of course I meant "add" because there are still touchpads in use that don't support multitouch so you get to keep both implementations. There are also a bunch of touchpads that can give you the position of two fingers but not of the third. Wipe that tear away and pencil that into your todo list. I haven't mentioned semi-mt devices yet that will give you multitouch position data for two fingers but it won't track them correctly - the first touch position is always the top/left of the bounding box, the second touch is always the bottom/right of the bounding box. Do the right thing for our libwhathaveidone and just pretend semi-mt devices are single-touch touchpads. libinput (the real one) does the same because my sanity is something to be cherished.

Oh, on another note, some touchpads don't have any buttons (some Wacom tablets are large touchpads). Add that to your todo list. You wanted middle buttons to work? Few touchpads have a middle button (clickpads never do anyway). Better write a middle button emulation system that generates BTN_MIDDLE when both buttons are pressed. Or when a finger is on the left and another finger is on the right software button. Or when a finger is in a virtual middle button area. All these need to be present because if not, you get dissed by users for not implementing their favourite interaction method.

So we're several paragraphs in and so far we have: finger tracking and some button handling. And a bunch of things on the todo list. We haven't even started with other fancy features like edge scrolling, two-finger scrolling, pinch/swipe gestures or thumb and palm detection. Oh, and you're not yet handling any other devices like graphics tablets which are a world of their own. If you think all the other features and devices are any less of a mess... well, an Austrian comedian once said (paraphrased): "optimism is just a fancy word for ignorance".

All this is just handling features that users have come to expect. Examples for non-features that you'll have to implement: on some Lenovo series (*50 and newer) you will get a pointer jump after a series of of events that only have pressure information. You'll have to detect and discard that jump. The HP Pavilion DM4 touchpad has random jumps in the slot data. Synaptics PS/2 touchpads may 'randomly' end touches and restart them on the next event frame 10ms later. If you don't handle that you'll get ghost taps. And so on and so forth.

So as you, happily or less so, continue writing your libthisismoreworkthanexpected you'll eventually come to realise that you're just reimplementing libinput. Congratulations or condolences, whichever applies.

libinput's raison d'etre is that it deals with all the mess above so that compositor authors can be blissfully unaware of all this. That's the reason why all the major/general-purpose compositors have switched to libinput. That's the reason most distributions now use libinput with the X server (through the xf86-input-libinput driver). libinput has made some design decisions that you may disagree with but honestly, that's life. Deal with it. It doesn't even do all I want and I wrote >90% of it. Suggesting that you can just handle evdev directly is like suggesting you can use GPS coordinates directly to navigate. Sure you can, but there's a reason why people instead use a Tom Tom or Google Maps.

25 Jul 2018 2:34am GMT

23 Jul 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Eric Anholt: 2018-07-23

Two more weeks of conformance debug, and I'm now down to 1 group of failures in GLES2 and 1 group in EGL, both of which I believe are bugs in the tests (regressions in recent CTS releases, which is why Intel hadn't caught them already).

Fixes have included:

I also spent a day knocking out some quick performance improvements:

After this I should probably work on the GMP support again, then get back to fixing GLES3.

23 Jul 2018 12:30am GMT

22 Jul 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Lennart Poettering: ASG! 2018 CfP Closes Soon

The All Systems Go! 2018 Call for Participation Closes in One Week!

The Call for Participation (CFP) for All Systems Go! 2018 will close in one week, on 30th of July! We'd like to invite you to submit your proposals for consideration to the CFP submission site quickly!

ASG image

Notification of acceptance and non-acceptance will go out within 7 days of the closing of the CFP.

All topics relevant to foundational open-source Linux technologies are welcome. In particular, however, we are looking for proposals including, but not limited to, the following topics:

While our focus is definitely more on the user-space side of things, talks about kernel projects are welcome, as long as they have a clear and direct relevance for user-space.

For more information please visit our conference website!

22 Jul 2018 10:00pm GMT