15 Oct 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Robert McQueen: Flatpaks, sandboxes and security

Last week the Flatpak community woke to the "news" that we are making the world a less secure place and we need to rethink what we're doing. Personally, I'm not sure this is a fair assessment of the situation. The "tl;dr" summary is: Flatpak confers many benefits besides the sandboxing, and even looking just at the sandboxing, improving app security is a huge problem space and so is a work in progress across multiple upstream projects. Much of what has been achieved so far already delivers incremental improvements in security, and we're making solid progress on the wider app distribution and portability problem space.

Sandboxing, like security in general, isn't a binary thing - you can't just say because you have a sandbox, you have 100% security. Like having two locks on your front door, two front doors, or locks on your windows too, sensible security is about defense in depth. Each barrier that you implement precludes some invalid or possibly malicious behaviour. You hope that in total, all of these barriers would prevent anything bad, but you can never really guarantee this - it's about multiplying together probabilities to get a smaller number. A computer which is switched off, in a locked faraday cage, with no connectivity, is perfectly secure - but it's also perfectly useless because you cannot actually use it. Sandboxing is very much the same - whilst you could easily take systemd-nspawn, Docker or any other container technology of choice and 100% lock down a desktop app, you wouldn't be able to interact with it at all.

Network services have incubated and driven most of the container usage on Linux up until now but they are fundamentally different to desktop applications. For services you can write a simple list of permissions like, "listen on this network port" and "save files over here" whereas desktop applications have a much larger number of touchpoints to the outside world which the user expects and requires for normal functionality. Just thinking off the top of my head you need to consider access to the filesystem, display server, input devices, notifications, IPC, accessibility, fonts, themes, configuration, audio playback and capture, video playback, screen sharing, GPU hardware, printing, app launching, removable media, and joysticks. Without making holes in the sandbox to allow access to these in to your app, it either wouldn't work at all, or it wouldn't work in the way that people have come to expect.

What Flatpak brings to this is understanding of the specific desktop app problem space - most of what I listed above is to a greater or lesser extent understood by Flatpak, or support is planned. The Flatpak sandbox is very configurable, allowing the application author to specify which of these resources they need access to. The Flatpak CLI asks the user about these during installation, and we provide the flatpak override command to allow the user to add or remove these sandbox escapes. Flatpak has introduced portals into the Linux desktop ecosystem, which we're really pleased to be sharing with snap since earlier this year, to provide runtime access to resources outside the sandbox based on policy and user consent. For instance, document access, app launching, input methods and recursive sandboxing ("sandbox me harder") have portals.

The starting security position on the desktop was quite terrible - anything in your session had basically complete access to everything belonging to your user, and many places to hide.

Even with these caveats, Flatpak brings a bunch of default sandboxing - IPC filtering, a new filesystem, process and UID namespace, seccomp filtering, an immutable /usr and /app - and each of these is already a barrier to certain attacks.

Looking at the specific concerns raised:

Zooming out a little bit, I think it's worth also highlighting some of the other reasons why Flatpak exists at all - these are far bigger problems with the Linux desktop ecosystem than app security alone, and Flatpak brings a huge array of benefits to the table:

Nobody is trying to claim that Flatpak solves all of the problems at once, or that what we have is anywhere near perfect or completely secure, but I think what we have is pretty damn cool (I just wish we'd had it 10 years ago!). Even just in the security space, the overall effort we need is huge, but this is a journey that we are happy to be embarking together with the whole Linux desktop community. Thanks for reading, trying it out, and lending us a hand.

15 Oct 2018 1:40pm GMT

05 Oct 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Christian Schaller: GStreamer Conference 2018

For the 9th time this year there will be the GStreamer Conference. This year it will be in Edinburgh, UK right after the Embedded Linux Conference Europe, on the 25th of 26th of October. The GStreamer Conference is always a lot of fun with a wide variety of talks around Linux and multimedia, not all of them tied to GStreamer itself, for instance in the past we had a lot of talks about PulseAudio, V4L, OpenGL and Vulkan and new codecs.This year I am really looking forward to talks such as the DeepStream talk by NVidia, Bringing Deep Neural Networks to GStreamer by Pexip and D3Dx Video Game Streaming on Windows by Bebo, to mention a few.

For a variety of reasons I missed the last couple of conferences, but this year I will be back in attendance and I am really looking forward to it. In fact it will be the first GStreamer Conference I am attending that I am not the organizer for, so it will be nice to really be able to just enjoy the conference and the hallway track this time.

So if you haven't booked yourself in already I strongly recommend going to the GStreamer Conference website and getting yourself signed up to attend.

See you all in Edinburgh!

Also looking forward to seeing everyone attending the PipeWire Hackfest happening right after the GStreamer Conference.

05 Oct 2018 5:08pm GMT

Rodrigo Siqueira: XDC 2018 Report

XDC 2018 Report


X.Org Developer's Conference (XDC) is the summit meeting for people that work with graphics in all the world to meet each other for three days. There you will find people working with compositors, direct rendering management (DRM), graphics applications, and so forth; all these people at the same place create a unique learning opportunity. Finally, you can feel the community spirit in every table, talk, and corner.

The XDC has many exciting talks, social events, and space for discussion with developers. All of this enabled thanks to the organization team, which did a great job by organizing the conference; they selected a great university that had a perfect structure for hosting the event. They also included social events that introduced some background about the history of the La Coruna; In my case, I enjoyed to learn a bit of the local history. About the food, the conference provided coffee breaks and lunch during all the days, all of them great!

About the community

In my case, I put as much effort as possible to learn from people. In the first day, I had a great conversation with Daniel Stone, Roman Gilg, Drew DeVault, Guido Günther and other about compositors. In particular, Daniel Stone explained a lot of details about Weston and Wayland; he also taught me how to test Weston on top of VKMS, and how to see logs. Additionally, Daniel gave me an excellent idea: add writeback to VKMS to provide visual output and other features. In the same day, Daniel explained me many things about the community organization and his work to maintain the Gitlab instance for the Freedesktop; I really enjoyed every second of our conversation.

Additionally, I met a group of Sway developers during lunch. After a small chat, for some reason they took their laptops and started to play with Sway; I got really impressed with their work and enthusiasm. Then, I decided that I wanted to learn how to contribute with Sway for two reasons: I want to learn more about graphics in the user space (compositors), and I want to use a new desktop environment. Afterwards, I started asking Drew to teach me how to compile and use Sway. He was really kind, he showed me many things about compositor then pointed me directions to better get into this world.

On the second day, I was obsessed about writeback, and I tried to talk with Brian Starkey; he is the original author of the patch that added writeback to DRM. We spoke for one hour, Bryan explained me so many details about writeback and gave me some ideas on how I could implement it on VKMS. In the end, he also sent me an email with diagrams that he made on-the-fly and some extra explanation about the subject. I am happy that I had the opportunity to learn so many things from him. In the same day, I also got a chance to talk to Arkadiusz Hiler about some of the patches that I sent to IGT, and I also made lots of questions about IGT. He explained with details, how I could read the intel CI report and other related stuff. I hope that after his explanations I can improve my patches and also send much more for IGT.

On the third day, Haneen and I worked together to learn as much as we could by asking many things to Daniel Vetter. We used the opportunity to clarify many of our questions, and also discuss some patches we sent. At the end of our conversation, I applied to become co-mentor in the Outreachy; I hope that I can help bringing new people to become part of this fantastic community.

This is just a brief summary of XDC, I took every single opportunity that I had to talk to people and learned something new.

I finally met Haneen, Daniel Vetter, Sean Paul, Martin Peres, and Arkadiusz Hiler

One exciting thing about working remotely it is the fact that you talk with many people without really know them in person. In particular, I worked with Haneen for such a long time, but I have never seen her; however, in the XDC I finally met her! It was really nice to talk to her, both of us were together most of the time trying to understand as much as we could; as a result, we always helped each other in the event to better understand the concepts that someone would explained us.

I also met Daniel Vetter, and Sean Paul, both of them were our mentors during summer. I really enjoyed to talk with them and put a face on the nickname. Additionally, I met Martin Peres, thanks to him I created this website to keep reporting my work and also thanks to him I could enjoy XDC.

Finally, I met Hiler from Intel. He provided many feedback on the patches I sent IGT; he also helped a lot in the IRC channel. I really liked to meet him in person.

Feedbacks

During the event, Haneen and I received so many feedback on how we could improve the VKMS that we decided to do a workshop in the last day. The workshop was great, a lot of people joined, and we took note of new ideas. From the conversation, we emerged the following list of tasks:

Now that I learned a lot and collected so many feedback, I will work on the following steps:

  1. Implement writeback support
  2. Implement configfs system
  3. Mentor a newcomer in the outreachy

05 Oct 2018 3:00am GMT

03 Oct 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Samuel Iglesias: XDC 2018 experience

XDC 2018 This year, X.org Developers' Conference (XDC 2018) happened in the Computer Science Faculty of University of Coruña, in the city of A Coruña, Spain during the last week of September, from Wednesday 26th to Friday 28th. XDC 2018 was a 3-day conference full of talks about all the technologies about free software graphics stack covering different topics like graphics driver development, testing and benchmarking, DRM, X, virtualization… Check the schedule for more info, slide decks and, once we have them edited, videos. For those loving statistics, we had 18 main track talks, 4 Workshops, 17 lightning talks, 3 social events, hallway tracks… Amazing!

XDC 2018 photo

This year we had 110 registered attendees and +40 students from the University of A Coruña attending it. Taking into account that some people couldn't come at the very last minute, we estimate that we had ~140 attendees in total, which is probably the most successful XDC conference ever in terms of attendance. Honestly, we were a bit worried as coming to A Coruña is not so easy as other international hubs, so thanks everybody for coming to A Coruña!

GPUL

This year the conference was organized by GPUL (Galician Linux User and Developer Group founded in 1998) together with University of A Coruña, Igalia and, of course, X.Org Foundation. The organization team was composed by 12 volunteers, some from Igalia and the rest from GPUL, who were taking care that everything went fine and fixed all the late minute issues that happened. I hope GPUL can keep organizing events for another 20 years! :-D

However, we are not perfect. Feel free to send us your feedback to both xdc2018@gpul.org and board@foundation.x.org, we would like to improve the organization of both next XDC conferences and our own local conferences.

Thanks to Igalia for allowing me organizing this event, for their platinum sponsorship and for sponsor Tuesday and Wednesday events.

Igalia

03 Oct 2018 12:00pm GMT

01 Oct 2018

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Hans de Goede: Announcing flickerfree boot for Fedora 29

A big project I've been working on recently for Fedora Workstation is what we call flickerfree boot. The idea here is that the firmware lights up the display in its native mode and no further modesets are done after that. Likewise there are also no unnecessary jarring graphical transitions.

Basically the machine boots up in UEFI mode, shows its vendor logo and then the screen keeps showing the vendor logo all the way to a smooth fade into the gdm screen. Here is a video of my main workstation booting this way.

Part of this effort is the hidden grub menu change for Fedora 29. I'm happy to announce that most of the other flickerfree changes have also landed for Fedora 29:


  1. There have been changes to shim and grub to not mess with the EFI framebuffer, leaving the vendor logo intact, when they don't have anything to display (so when grub is hidden)
  2. There have been changes to the kernel to properly inherit the EFI framebuffer when using Intel integrated graphics, and to delay switching the display to the framebuffer-console until the first kernel message is printed. Together with changes to make "quiet" really quiet (except for oopses/panics) this means that the kernel now also leaves the EFI framebuffer with the logo intact if quiet is used.
  3. There have been changes to plymouth to allow pressing ESC as soon as plymouth loads to get detailed boot messages.

With all these changes in place it is possible to get a fully flickerfree boot today, as the video of my workstation shows. This video is made with a stock Fedora 29 with 2 small kernel commandline tweaks:


  1. Add "i915.fastboot=1" to the kernel commandline, this removes the first and last modeset during the boot when using the i915 driver.
  2. Add "plymouth.splash-delay=20" to the kernel commandline. Normally plymouth waits 5 seconds before showing the charging Fedora logo so that on systems which boot in less then 5 seconds the system simply immediately transitions to gdm. On systems which take slightly longer to boot this makes the charging Fedora logo show up, which IMHO makes the boot less fluid. This option increases the time plymouth waits with showing the splash to 20 seconds.

So if you have a machine with Intel integrated graphics and booting in UEFI mode, you can give flickerfree boot support a spin with Fedora 29 by just adding these 2 commandline options. Note this requires the new grub hidden menu feature to be enabled, see the FAQ on this.

The need for these 2 commandline options shows that the work on this is not yet entirely complete, here is my current TODO list for finishing this feature:


  1. Work with the upstream i915 driver devs to make i915.fastboot the default. If you try i915.fastboot=1 and it causes problems for you please let me know.
  2. Write a new plymouth theme based on the spinner theme which used the vendor logo as background and draws the spinner beneath it. Since this keeps the logo and black background as is and just draws the spinner on top this avoids the current visually jarring transition from logo screen to plymouth, allowing us to set plymouth.splash-delay to 0. This also has the advantage that the spinner will provide visual feedback that something is actually happening as soon as plymouth loads.
  3. Look into making this work with AMD and NVIDIA graphics.

Please give the new flickerfree support a spin and let me know if you have any issues with it.

01 Oct 2018 12:18pm GMT

Hans de Goede: GRUB hidden menu change FAQ

There have questions about the new GRUB hidden menu Change in various places, here is a FAQ which hopefully answers most questions:

1. What is the GRUB hidden menu change?

See the Detailed Description on the change page. The main motivation for adding this is to get to a fully flickerfree boot.

2. How to enable hidden GRUB menu?

On new Fedora 29 Workstation installs this will be enabled by default. If your system has been upgraded to F29 from an older release, you can enable it by running these commands:

On a system using UEFI booting ("ls /sys/firmware/efi/efivars" returns a bunch of files):

sudo grub2-editenv - set menu_auto_hide=1
sudo grub2-mkconfig -o /etc/grub2-efi.cfg


On a system using legacy BIOS boot:

sudo grub2-editenv - set menu_auto_hide=1
sudo grub2-mkconfig -o /etc/grub2.cfg


Note the grub2-mkconfig will overwrite any manual changes you've made to your grub.cfg (normally no manually changes are done to this file).

If your system has Windows on it, but you boot it only once a year so you would still like to hide the GRUB menu, you can tell GRUB to ignore the presence of Windows by running:

sudo grub2-editenv - set menu_auto_hide=2

3. How to disable hidden GRUB menu

To permanently disable the auto-hide feature run:

sudo grub2-editenv - unset menu_auto_hide

That is it.

4.How to access the GRUB menu when hidden

If for some reason you need to access the GRUB menu while it is hidden there are multiple ways to get to it:


  1. If you can get to gdm, access the top-right menu (the system menu) and click on the power [⏻] icon. Then keep ALT pressed to change the "Restart" option into "Boot Options" and click "Boot Options".
  2. While booting keep SHIFT pressed, usually you need to first press SHIFT when the vendor logo is shown by the firmware / when the firmware says e.g. "Press F2 to enter setup" if you press it earlier it may not be seen. Note this may not work on some machines.
  3. During boot press ESC or F8 while GRUB loads (simply press the key repeatedly directly after power on until you are in the menu).
  4. Force the previous boot to be considered failed:

    1. Press CTRL + ALT + DEL while booting so that the system reboots before hitting gdm
    2. Press CTRL + ALT + F6 to switch away from gdm, followed by CTRL + ALT + DEL.
    3. Press the power-button for 4 seconds to force the machine off.
    Either of these will cause the boot_success grub_env flag to not get set and
    the menu will show the next boot.
  5. Manually set the menu show once flag by running: "grub-set-bootflag menu_show_once" This will cause the menu to show for 60 seconds before continuing with the default boot-option.

5. When is a boot considered successful ?

The boot_success grub_env flag gets set when you login as a normal user and your session lasts at least 2 minutes; or when you shutdown or restart the system from the GNOME system (top-right) menu.

So if you e.g. login, do something and then within 30 seconds type reboot in a terminal (instead of doing the reboot from the menu) then this will not count as a successful boot and the menu will show the next boot.

01 Oct 2018 12:13pm GMT

28 Sep 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Robert Foss: Android on Mainline Graphics @ All Systems Go

Intro slide

Downloads

If you're curious about the slides, you can download the PDF or the ODP.

Thanks

This post has been a part of work undertaken by my employer Collabora.

I would like to thank the wonderful organizers of All Systems Go!, the @ASGConf for hosting a great event.

28 Sep 2018 10:00pm GMT

25 Sep 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Roman Gilg: Wayland future and legacy

Plasma 5.14 is right around the corner, time to write again an update like I did for 5.13 on what was achieved in terms of Wayland and what is in the work.

On blocking and reprioritizing work

First I directly admit on what I did teaser for 5.14 in my last update but what will not make it: generic gamma color correction per display. There are two reasons for it. The first one is that some preliminary patches, which needed to be merged first, endured long review phases. The second reason is, that when these patches finally were accepted I had shifted my focus on some other topics, which I decided to give an higher priority.

Before delving into these other topics, a short analysis on why the reviews took so long: first there were of course some improvements possible to my patches, but after these got pointed out in the reviews I did fix them back then pretty quickly. The more striking reason is though that we are just short on people who can actually review KWin code changes, in particular with Martin being not maintainer anymore. That is not only a problem for my proposed code changes, but for anyone's patches to KWin. And this hasn't improved since back then. We must find a way to reduce the review pressure on the people being capable of doing reviews somehow, at best with only a minimal hit in code quality. I don't have a full solution for this problem yet, we will see if we find a good one.

After this is out of the way, let us talk about these other features, which I prioritized higher.

Xwayland drag and drop translation

Drag and drop is an important workflow on desktop platforms. In our Wayland session Xwayland clients were able to do this between each other through the X protocol provided by Xwayland. Wayland native clients were able to do it with the Wayland interfaces for data sharing, what already has been implemented in most aspects in KWin and KWayland.

But these two world were separated. Wayland native clients could not drop something on an Xwayland client and vice versa. For that to work a translation layer needed to be created. We had already some small workaround to translate the clipboard in place, but a similar small workaround would not have worked for drag and drop.

Nevertheless I have a solution now, not a small one for sure, but it is similar to how Weston and wlroots try to solve the task, what will hopefully allow us to work closer together in this regard in the future. The solution also rewrites the clipboard mechanism to have it more in line with the other compositors and to be better integrated in the Xwayland handling part of KWin. All the details I omit here for now, but if there is interest I will write another article only about this subject.

In regards to the other compositors one last comment: the Weston solution seems to be only partly done and wlroots still struggles with a few remaining issues, but it was still immensely helpful to read their code to get a first understanding on what needs to be done besides some other literature. I hope I can repay the favor by providing now some more information to them on what I learned when I wrote my patches.

Pointer lock and confining reimagined

While Xwayland drag and drop translation took up the majority of my time in the last three months and is somewhat more important to the majority of our users, who do daily work in the browser, there is a particular subset of users, who will be very happy about a series of changes I did before that and which even already will be available in 5.14. I am talking about our support for pointer constraining, what consists of pointer locking and pointer confining, and the particular subset of users affected by that are gamers.

In the past we already supported pointer constraints, but the support lacked in numerous aspects. I won't go into detail, but anybody who tried to play some games in a Wayland session can probably tell you about problems, starting from annoyingly often displayed warning messages to never locked or never unlocked cursors. A list of issues and what I did to solve them, can be found here.

The end result should be that pointer constraints can be used from 5.14 on without any hiccups and without even being noticed. This should improve the quality of our Wayland session for gamers drastically and I have planned some more changes for the future to improve it even more.

Touch drags and input redirection rework

A small missing item I noticed when working on Xwayland drag and drop was that we did not yet support Wayland native drags executed through input on a touch screen. To enable these only a few small code additions to KWayland and to KWin were necessary.

But when working on this feature and with my experience from the Xwayland drag and drop project it became all so more apparent to me that our input redirection code for pointer and touch devices needed a serious overhaul. In general the original idea behind it was fine: input redirection detects which client, decoration or internal window (a surface being created by KWin to use on its own, for example for depicting its effects) has device input focus. There is an update function per device, which redetermines the target, and there are filters to run though to channel off events in case of compositor overruling for example by some effect. But in detail there was much code duplication going on and the update function was recalled rather randomly throughout numerous filters.

My patch improves the code in both aspects: the update function gets called only once per event and code duplication is reduced through more inheritance usage. Also it is now more clear when the input focus is on the decoration of a client or if the client is an internal window and what to do then. Overall the effects of this rework will not be directly visible to the user, but it will give us a stronger foundation to build upon in the future.

Outlook

There is some more foundational work without a direct huge visible payoff necessary, in particular to how internal windows are being treated in KWin, which spawned some nasty problems in the past and needs a more thorough investigation than quick workarounds to ease the immediate pain.

Other foundational work, but which at least has direct impact, is the reorganization of our painting pipeline for multiple outputs at different frequencies, what was mentioned above already as an improvement for gamers. Doing this will not be a small feat and we will see when there is time for it. I hope sooner than later.

What should not be forgotten when talking about this particular feature is adaptive synchronization, better known under AMD's trademark FreeSync and that we want to support this technology of course as well. But the patches to the kernel and Mesa only recently have been posted to the respective mailing lists and I have literally no idea what is necessary from our side to enable it.

This and others topics to discuss is what I am looking forward to when the X.Org Developer's Conference 2018 starts tomorrow morning in A Coruña. I traveled a bit through Galicia in the last few days with a rental car and will arrive in the city at some point later today (by the way the picture accompanying this article is from one of the stops I made). Looking at the program and the attendees this should become a very interesting conference. If you are interested as well, you can follow the livestream starting tomorrow with the regular program.

25 Sep 2018 12:00pm GMT

24 Sep 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Christian Schaller: Getting the team together to revolutionize Linux audio

So anyone reading my blog posts would probably have picked up on my excitement for the PipeWire project, the effort to unify the world of Linux audio, add an equivalent video bit and provide multimedia handling capabilities to containerized applications. The video part as I have mentioned before was the critical first step and that is starting to look really good with the screen sharing functionality in GNOME shell already using PipeWire and equivalent PipeWire support being added to KDE by Jan Grulich. We have internal patches for both Firefox and Chrome(ium) which we are polishing up to propose them upstream, but we will in the meantime offer them as downstream patches in Fedora as soon as they are ready for primetime. Once those patches are deployed you should have any browser based desktop sharing software, like Google Hangouts, working fully under Wayland (and X).

With the video part of PipeWire already in production we decided the time has come to try to accelerate the development of the audio bits. So PipeWire creator Wim Taymans, PulseAudio developer Arun Raghavan and myself decided to try to host a PipeWire hackfest this fall to bring together many of the core Linux audio developers to try to hash out a plan and a roadmap. So I am very happy to say that at the end of October we will have a gathering in Edinburgh to work on this and the critical people we where hoping to have there are coming. Filipe Coelho who is the current lead developer on Jack will be there alongside Arun Raghavan, Colin Guthrie and Tanu Kaskinen from PulseAudio, Bastien Nocera from the GNOME project and Jan Grulich from KDE will be there representing desktop integration and finally Nirbheek Chauhan, Nicolas Dufresne and George Kiagiadakis from the GStreamer project. I think we have about the right amount of people for this to be productive and at the same time have representation from everyone who needs to be there, so I am feeling very optimistic that we can come out of this event with both a plan for what we want to do and the right people involved to make it happen. The idea that we can have a shared infrastructure for consumer level audio and pro-audio under Linux really excites me and I do believe that if we do this right Linux will take a huge step forward as a natural home for pro-audio desktop users.

A big thanks you to the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring this event and allow us to bring all this people together!

24 Sep 2018 7:31pm GMT

15 Sep 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Samuel Iglesias: XDC 2018: getting ready

XDC 2018 is going to happen in the Computer Science Faculty of University of Coruña, in the city of A Coruña, Spain during the last week of September, from Wednesday 26th to Friday 28th. This is a 3-day conference full of talks about all the technologies about free software graphics stack covering different topics like graphics driver development, testing and benchmarking, DRM, X, virtualization… Check the schedule for more info.

As member of the organization team, I'm proud to announce that there are several surprises for the attendees :-)

The organization team wants also to help attendees. If you have any food allergy, dietary restriction or something else that we should know in advance, please contact us as soon as possible, either by xdc2018@gpul.org or at the registration desk.

See you at X.org Developer's Conference 2018!

15 Sep 2018 12:00pm GMT

10 Sep 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Lennart Poettering: ASG! 2018 Tickets

All Systems Go! 2018 Tickets Selling Out Quickly!

Buy your tickets for All Systems Go! 2018 soon, they are quickly selling out! The conference takes place on September 28-30, in Berlin, Germany, in a bit over two weeks.

Why should you attend? If you are interested in low-level Linux userspace, then All Systems Go! is the right conference for you. It covers all topics relevant to foundational open-source Linux technologies. For details on the covered topics see our schedule for day #1 and for day #2.

For more information please visit our conference website!

See you in Berlin!

10 Sep 2018 10:00pm GMT

09 Sep 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Roman Gilg: My first Akademy in retrospect

Last month KDE Akademy was held in Vienna. It was the first Akademy I visited and there wasn't yet time to write a bit about the impression I got from it, judging what was nice and what could be improved from the point of view of someone new to it. Time to catch up on that.

Akademy came at a bad point in time for me. I was right in the middle of writing code for a larger feature in KWin's Wayland session: drag-and-drop support between Wayland native and Xwayland windows. When I began the work on this feature back in July I hoped that I could finish it until Akademy. Not being able to do so felt demotivating, but I have to admit my plan was way too optimistic anyways. Only now, several weeks after Akademy, I feel comfortable enough about my code to use it on my work system without constant anxiety for fatal session crashes. But anyway, I went to my first Akademy with a bit less enthusiasm, as I otherwise probably would have shown. On the other side this gives me maybe also a more neutral take on it.

Akademy is basically split into two phases: the talks at the beginning on Saturday and Sunday and the BoFs for the rest of the time from Monday till Friday.

The talks

This is basically what you expect from a conference. Talks by people involved in the community or friends from the outside about different topics related to KDE. And these topics were very different indeed, what shows how large the KDE community and its reach really is. Often KDE is identified with the desktop environment Plasma alone, but there is much more to it. Having this kind of diversity in topics is a great plus to Akademy.

Still one has to say that Plasma is KDE's flagship offering and by that deserves a central spot in the lineup. So judging from a Plasma dev point of view was this the case at this Akademy? That's difficult to judge. There were interesting longer talks by David and Nate about the core Plasma Desktop experience, David's talk technical, Nate's talk on a broader more visionary note they both presented a path forward for Plasma. There were also talks about Plasma in other contexts, for example by Bhushan about Plasma on Mobile.

So judging by quantity there were enough Plasma talks I would say. Also I can't really complain, since I personally did not contribute to increasing the quantity by submitting a talk proposal myself. The reason was just that on my first Akademy I wanted to be a listener only. So let us say quantity was fine and quality from what I can tell as a listener as well.

Still there was a distinct feel of too few, too disconnected, and I believe especially too disconnected describes it correctly, not only in regards to Plasma. The talks were spread out over two days in two different sized rooms somewhat randomly. There was no noticeable order to them or a grand arc connecting them besides being somewhat KDE related. One could argue this is a direct result of the KDE community being so diverse in interests and topics. But I believe with good planning by some key figures from the different parts of the community the talks could have been placed better and feel less disjointed. Also more relevant key notes would have helped. They could have provided for example an overarching focus point of the conference interconnecting the talks.

The BoFs

The second part of Akademy were the BoFs, what went for a full workweek. BoF means Birds of a feather and it denotes an informal discussion group about a specific topic. There were many BoFs, often in parallel, and I visited lots of them.

I won't go into detail for all of them, but a general impression I got was that there is no clear definition of what a BoF should be and what should happen. What is kind of the point of a BoF but somewhat still often disappointing. In an extreme case a BoF I visited was more an internal discussion of a team of half a dozen people working closely together and left everybody just interested in learning more about the project on the outside since they did not know enough about the project's internals yet. The BoF itself was not named as such and outsiders visiting out of interest were for sure disappointed. Other BoFs were more welcoming to newcomers, but still lacked a guiding structure or just someone moderating the discussion efficiently.

A plan to improve the BoF sessions could be the following: split them up into a mandatory common / introductory part and an optional team / current progress / special topic part, and advertise them as such to conference attendees. While both parts would still be open to anyone, the common part would be specifically suited for newcomers to the project while the team part can be used to discuss current topics in-depth. This at first sounds like it is double the work for project members, but the common part could be simply some reusable presentation slides explaining the core structure of the project together with a Q&A session. So I believe the additional amount of work is small. Also people would know what they get into and could plan their time efficiently. Besides one person from the team, which would probably most often be the maintainer or project lead, others could avoid the introductory part and newcomers could avoid the team part if they don't yet feel knowledgeable enough to follow the discussion.

The organisation

In general I felt the conference was well organized for being done by volunteers, who were by the way super friendly and keen on helping and solving problems. There were a few issues ranging from non-functional printers to a way too small social event site, but they were so minor to not be worth delving into them more.

But there is one large issue that can not be ignored, and this is the availability and quality of videos form the conference. The videos have just been published recently and I think this is too late. They should be online not later than one week after Akademy.

And watching these videos is no fun at all. The talk recordings have a low resolution, filmed from way back in the room, and the voice quality often is abysmal. In comparison to last Akademy the vidoes already have improved, but they still lack the quality you would expect from an open tech community having the web as the main communication channel.

As an example what a good recording looks like take a look at this talk out of the chamber of darkness. I personally would take some of the Pineapple money and pay a team of professionals at next Akademy to record the talks in HD and upload them timely if we can not do it on our own. Enabling people who can not travel to Akademy to watch the presentations pleasantly and the additional exposure are always worth it.

The social and unofficial program

Of course technical topics are not everything about Akademy. The conference exists also to connect like-minded people and let otherwise semi-anonymous contributors meet each other in person, what often enables them to work better together on KDE projects in the future. Overall for me personally this was fine. I know most of the Plasma devs already and we just had a meeting in Berlin a few months ago. So there was not really that much need to talk in person again, although it helped for some current hot topics of course.

But there were some members of the VDG I was really looking forward to meet in person and the discussions we had were very fruitful. Also it was great to get to know Carlos from the GNOME project. I hope we can improve the collaboration of our communities in term of Wayland in the future. What I missed was talking more with some of the KDE Apps and Frameworks devs. I am not sure why this was. Maybe my personal area of work just does not intersect that much with apps developers at the moment.

Conclusion

This article was in some parts quite critical to Akademy, but that does not mean the conference was bad. Quite the contrary, I enjoyed meeting all the members and friends of the KDE community and I can recommend going there to anyone from user to maintainer of KDE software. It doesn't matter what kind of KDE offering you use or contribute to, you will find sessions that interest you and people who share that same interest. Next Akademy is in less than a year and I look forward to meeting you there again or for the first time.

09 Sep 2018 11:00am GMT

07 Sep 2018

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Eric Anholt: 2018-09-07

TWIV3D has been inactive for a bit, because I've been inactive for a bit. On August 15th, we added Moss Anholt to our family:

moss

So most of my time has been spent laying around with them and keeping us fed instead of writing software.

Here and there I've managed to write some patches. I've been working on meeting the current GLES3 CTS's requirement for a 565 window system buffer being available. We don't expose those on X11 today, because why would you? Your screen is 8888, so all you could do with 565 is render to a pixmap or buffer. Rendering to a pixmap is useless, becasue EGL doesn't tell you whether R is in the top or bottom bits, so the X11 client doesn't know how to interpret the rendered contents other than glReadPixels() (at which point, just use an FBO). My solution for this bad requirement from the CTS has been to add support for 565 pbuffers, which is pointless but is the minimum. This led to a patch to the xserver and a fix to V3D for blending against RTs without alpha channels.

I'm particularly proud of a small series to create a default case handler function for gallium pipe caps. Previously, every addition of a PIPE_CAP (which happens probably at least 10 times a year) has to touch every single driver, or that driver will start failing. It's easy to forget a driver, particularly when rebasing a series across the addition of a new driver. And for driver authors, you're faced with this list of 100 values which you don't know the correct state of when starting to write a driver. The new helper lets CAP creators set a default value (usually whatever the hardcoded value was before their new CAP), and lets driver authors specify a much smaller set of required caps to get started.

Just before Moss arrived, I had landed some patches to VC4 to improve texture upload/download performance. Non-GL SDL apps on glamor were really slow, because the window wouldn't be aligned to tiles and we'd download the tile-aligned area from the framebuffer to a raster-order temporary, store our new contents into it, then reupload that to the screen. The download from write-combined memory is brutally slow. My new code (mostly a rebase of patches I wrote in January 2017!) got the following results:

I also wrote a followup patch to avoid the copy from the user's buffer into the temporary in the driver for texture uploads, for another 12.1586% +/- 1.38155% (n=145)

Other things since my last post:

07 Sep 2018 12:30am GMT

04 Sep 2018

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Peter Hutterer: What's new in libinput 1.12

libinput 1.12 was a massive development effort (over 300 patchsets) with a bunch of new features being merged. It'll be released next week or so, so it's worth taking a step back and looking at what actually changed.

The device quirks files replace the previously used hwdb-based udev properties. I've written about this in more detail here but the gist is: we have our own .ini style file format that can match on devices and apply the various quirks devices need. This simplifies debugging a lot, we can now reliably tell users why a quirks file applies or doesn't apply, historically a problem with the hwdb.

The sphinx-based documentation was merged, fixed and added to. We switched to sphinx for the docs and the result is much more user-friendly. Which was the point, it was a switch from a developer-oriented documentation to a user-oriented one. Not that documentation is ever finished.

The usual set of touchpad improvements went in, e.g. the slight motion on finger up is now ignored. We have size-based thumb detection now (useful for Apple touchpads!). And of course various quirks for better pressure ranges, etc. Tripletap on some synaptics touchpads had a tendency to cause multiple taps because of some weird event sequence. Movement in the software button now generates events, the buttons are not just a dead zone anymore. Pointer jump detection is more adaptive now and catches and discards smaller jumps that previously slipped through the cracks. A particularly quirky behaviour was seen on Dell XPS i2c touchpads that exhibit a huge pointer jump, courtesy of the trackpoint controller going to sleep and taking its time to wake up. The delay is still there but the pointer at least lands in the correct location.

We now have improved direction-locking for two-finger scrolling on touchpads. Scrolling up/down should not generate horizontal scroll events anymore as long as the movement is close enough to vertical. This feature is transparent, a diagonal or horizontal movement will immediately disable the direction lock and produce horizontal scroll events as expected.

The trackpoint acceleration has been re-done, see this post for more details and links to the background articles. I've only received one bug report for the new acceleration so it seems to work quite well now. Trackpoints that send events in bursts (e.g. bluetooth ones) are smoothened now to avoid jerky movement.

Velocity averaging was dropped to increase pointer accuracy. Previously we averaged the velocity across multiple events which makes the motion smoother on jittery devices but less accurate on good devices.

We build on FreeBSD now. Presumably this also means it works on FreeBSD :)

libinput now supports palm detection on touchscreens, at least where the ABS_MT_TOOL_TYPE evdev bit is provided.

I think that's about it. Busy days...

04 Sep 2018 3:34am GMT

02 Sep 2018

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Alyssa Rosenzweig: Panfrost on the RK3399 (Meow!)

A 3D model of a cat with Phong shading

In January 2018, I began using my C201 full-time. In June 2018, its charging port broke, apparently due to physical damage, and I was forced to discontinue my school laptop and Mali T760 development machine.

Rest in peace, Veyron Speedy.


In its place, I purchased adopted Kevin, better known by its brand name, the Samsung Chromebook Plus (v1). Kevin contains a 64-bit Rockchip RK3399 processor, a substantial upgrade over the C201's Rockchip RK3288, with a Mali T860 graphics processor. The T860, a new version of Mali Midgard in between its predecessor T760 and its successor Bifrost, was not supported in Panfrost, the community-led free software driver for modern Mali GPUs ubiquitous in phones and Chromebooks.

Meanwhile, back in May, TL Lim of Pine64 generously offered to send me a RK3399 development board, a ROCKPRO64. During my university days, the board arrived… and so work begun on T860 support.


The new hardware contains a number of challenges unseen in its predecessors. For instance, the RK3288 is a 32-bit processor (armv7) whereas the RK3399 is 64-bit (armv8). While Midgard is natively 64-bit, there are many memory-saving optimizations specifically for 32-bit machines like the RK3288. For instance, in the 32-bit command stream, the field encoding line width is stuffed in between a pointer at the end of the header and the beginning metadata of the tiler payload, in a spot that normally would contain padding to align everything. On a 64-bit machine, however, the preceding pointer is a full 8 bytes, and there is no room for the line width hack to function; this field is instead moved from the first to the last index in the data structure.

Another small change that took far too long to figure out was the modified kernel API for importing memory on 64-bit systems. Imports are necessary to setup the framebuffer correctly, avoiding expensive fullscreen blits. Once I read through the 64-bit portions of the kernel module, it was clear how to implement the new calls, but this change nevertheless slowed initial progress.

Another more challenging departure was the FBDs. From the kernel sources, we know there are two mysterious acronyms, SFBD and MFBD. We figured out these referred to the Framebuffer Descriptor. Why two? It turns out that older Midgard used the SFBD, and newer Midgard and Bifrost use the MFBD. The change coincided with the introduction of multi-render target (MRT) support in the newer chips. Accordingly, we are guessing these are the Single Framebuffer Descriptor (SFBD) and Multiple Framebuffer Descriptor (MFBD), though we can of course never be sure.

In any event, while the T760 supported MFBDs, it was possible to use a 32-bit SFBD instead. On the newer T860, due to the upgraded development hardware, we had no choice but to support the newer data structure. Luckily, Connor had already decoded the majority of the MFBD as part of his investigation in Bifrost. I was easily able to adapt his changes for the T860-family of processors, et voila, the command stream was making sense.

After decoding the new parts of the command stream, I implemented support in the Gallium driver for the new structures; as structures like the framebuffer descriptor are so fundamental, this implied significant changes. But after some fervent coding, the driver for T860 reached feature parity with Panfrost on the T760.

Turning our attention to shaders, it turns out there are no significant differences in the shader core between these two chips. That is, the minute I could replay a triangle on my laptop, we had free shaders. Woohoo!

Once the new hardware was setup, I turned my focus to cleaning up the codebase, implementing more of OpenGL ES 2.0, and debugging issues in the existing implementations. I squashed bugs ("Ow!") ranging from incorrect stencil testing to broken colour masking in the absence of blending to missing movs in certain shaders. In terms of new features, I implemented the scissor test and added support for shaders with multiple varyings, a common pattern which did not show up in the simpler 3D tests. Multi-varying support required changes in both the command stream driver and the compiler, although we're now able to understand why varyings are encoded in the (quirky) way they are.

I also (finally) fixed glReadPixels support, so we can start testing with dEQP and Piglit. The results remain somewhat depressing, but it's a starting point for further driver debugging as we make the jump from proof-of-concept to production code.

Soup's up, everypony!

(The soup is code.)


On the Bifrost side, Connor Abbott and Lyude Paul have been busy!

After decoding more of the Bifrost ISA, Connor turned his attention to the Bifrost command-stream, an iterative improvement on the Midgard command-stream. Building on my earlier work with the Midgard command stream, Connor identified analogue structures between the two versions, as well as marking off new structures including the aforementioned MFBD.

After decoding these initial structures, he implemented support in panwrap for generating replay-style traces of Bifrost command streams, again building on the infrastructure originally built for Midgard. Although he did not make direct use of the replay facilities in panwrap, these changes did enable a great deal of the Bifrost command stream to be elucidated.

He then went a step further, beyond OpenGL ES 2.0 vertex shaders and fragment shaders, venturing into the land of… compute shaders. Dun dun dun! ("What, no scary music?" "Sorry, Proselint says you already violated the 30ppm of exclamations rule. We are therefore forbidden from aiding your overexcited shenanigans." "Fiiine. Do I at least get a singing entourage?" "Definitely not.")

Incidentally, the initial investigations into compute shaders have shed light on vertex shaders, which are internally structured like compute jobs on both Bifrost and Midgard, with each vertex corresponding to a single invocation. However, Connor had a more immediate purpose in mind with his pursuit of compute shaders: gaining the ability to execute arbitrary shader binaries on a Bifrost board, implementing a "shader runner" to use the trochaic name. Midgard never needed this tool, as I have generally implemented the command stream parts of the driver in advance of the compiler, but Bifrost's ISA decoding is considerably further along than its graphics pipeline. Through his earlier work with panwrap, he was successfully able to build such a tool, directly submitting simple compute jobs with offline precompiled shaders to the Bifrost GPU!

That does beg the question - where do these shader binaries come from, as work has not yet begun on the Bifrost compiler? As you may know, Lyude has been at work implementing a Bifrost assembler, a large task given the shear complexity of Bifrost, especially in comparison to Midgard - and a task made even harder without the ability to test on neither real hardware nor emulators. Paired with Connor's shader runner, however, the assembler's shader binaries can be tested, and her assembler is showing signs of life! Pairing these two components have enabled the first free shaders to run on Bifrost. While there are a few unimplemented opcodes remaining, the assembler is working well.

Returning to the shader running, beyond its immense value as a proof-of-concept, a side benefit of this instrumentation is enabling fine-grained ISA decoding. Whereas Midgard uses high-level arithmetic opcodes, with dedicated instructions for operations like a reciprocal-square root, Bifrost uses a minimalist architecture, dividing complex high-level operations into many small instructions. However, it can be difficult to discern the individual meaning of each micro opcode from simply studying disassembled compiled shaders. Nevertheless, with the new ability to assemble and run shaders, it is possible to test micro operations individually, determining their functions outside the high-level sequence. Through this technique, Connor has been able to understand the fine-grained details of operations like division on Bifrost.

All in all, our understanding of Bifrost is beginning to converge with that of Midgard. The next step, of course, will be to implement the Bifrost compiler and extend the Midgard driver to support Bifrost command streams. But hey, if someone had told me a year ago that we could run code natively, bloblessly, on virtually every Mali device, I don't think I would have believed them. But between our work on Midgard and Bifrost, not to mention the Lima project's work on Utgard, this dream has become a reality. In the words of Equestria Girls, what a strange new world…


But let's not get ahead of ourselves. On the Mali T860 (Midgard), Freedreno's test-cat and glmark2's equivalent build test run successfully. The shaded cat screenshot at the beginning of the post is a native blobless render on the T860. Of course, the tests demoed on previous blog posts, like the shiny textured cube, continue to work on the new hardware.

Oh, and save for a funky viewport (corrected here) and some sporadic artefacts, it runs 'gears:

es2gears on the T860 with the blobless Panfrost stackes2gears on the T860 with the blobless Panfrost stack

Meow!

02 Sep 2018 7:00am GMT

30 Aug 2018

feedplanet.freedesktop.org

Robert Foss: Status of the Open Source GPU Ecosystem @ OSSummit NA

Intro slide

Downloads

If you're curious about the slides, you can download the PDF or the ODP.

Thanks

This post has been a part of work undertaken by my employer Collabora.

I would like to thank the wonderful organizers of OSSummit NA, the Linux Foundation for hosting a great event.

30 Aug 2018 10:00pm GMT