20 Nov 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Alexys Jacob: RIP ns2

Today we did shutdown our now oldest running Gentoo Linux production server : ns2.

Obviously this machine was happily spreading our DNS records around the world but what's remarkable about it is that it has been doing so for 2717 straight days !

$ uptime
 13:00:45 up 2717 days,  2:20,  1 user,  load average: 0.13, 0.04, 0.01

As I mentioned when we did shutdown stabber, our beloved firewall, our company has been running Gentoo Linux servers in production for a long time now and we're always a bit sad when we have to power off one of them.

As usual, I want to take this chance to thank everyone contributing to Gentoo Linux ! Without our collective work, none of this would have been possible.

20 Nov 2014 12:39pm GMT

19 Nov 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Aaron W. Swenson: Request Tracker

So, I've kind of taken over Request Tracker (bestpractical.com).

Initially I took it because I'm interested in using RT at work to take track customer service emails. All I did at the time was bump the version and remove old, insecure versions from the tree.

However, as I've finally gotten around to working on getting it setup, I've discovered there were a lot of issues that had gone unreported.

The intention is for RT to run out of its virtual host root, like /var/www/localhost/rt-4.2.9/bin/rt and configured by /var/www/localhost/rt-4.2.9/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm, and for it to reference any supplementary packages with ${VHOST_ROOT} as its root. However, because of a broken install process and a broken hook script used by webapp-config that didn't happen. Further, the rt_apache.conf included by us was outdated by a few years, too, which in itself isn't a bad thing, except that it was wrong for RT 4+.

I spent much longer than I care to admit trying to figure out why my settings weren't sticking when I edited RT_SiteConfig.pm. I was trying to run RT under its own path rather than on a subdomain, but Set($WebPath, '/rt') wasn't doing what it should.

It also complained about not being able to write to /usr/share/webapps/rt/rt-4.2.9/data/mason_data/obj, which clearly wasn't right.

Once I tried moving RT_SiteConfig.pm to /usr/share/webapps/rt/rt-4.2.9/etc/, and chmod and chown on ../data/mason_data/obj, everything worked as it should.

Knowing this was wrong and that it would prevent anyone using our package from having multiple installation, aka vhosts, I set out to fix it.

It was a descent into madness. Things I expected to happen did not. Things that shouldn't have been a problem were. Much of the trouble I had circled around webapp-config and webapp.eclass.

But, I prevailed, and now you can really have multiple RT installations side-by-side. Also, I've added an article (wiki.gentoo.org) to our wiki with updated instructions on getting RT up and running.

Caveat: I didn't use FastCGI, so that part may be wrong still, but mod_perl is good to go.

19 Nov 2014 3:52pm GMT

16 Nov 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Sebastian Pipping: (German) rsync mirror rsync1.de.gentoo.org wieder online

Nach mehreren Wochen downtime - primär durch mich verschuldet - ist rsync1.de.gentoo.org nun wieder online.
Wie vorher wird das komplette Repository aus einer RAM disk ausgeliefert, daher ist der Mirror relativ flott.

# rsync --list-only rsync://rsync1.de.gentoo.org/gentoo-portage/
drwxr-xr-x          3,480 2014/11/16 16:01:19 .
-rw-r--r--            121 2014/01/01 01:31:01 header.txt
-rw-r--r--          3,658 2014/08/18 21:01:02 skel.ChangeLog
-rw-r--r--          8,119 2014/08/30 12:01:02 skel.ebuild
-rw-r--r--          1,231 2014/08/18 21:01:02 skel.metadata.xml
drwxr-xr-x            860 2014/11/16 16:01:02 app-accessibility
drwxr-xr-x          4,800 2014/11/16 16:01:03 app-admin
drwxr-xr-x            100 2014/11/16 16:01:03 app-antivirus
[..]
drwxr-xr-x          1,240 2014/11/16 16:01:21 x11-wm
drwxr-xr-x            340 2014/11/16 16:01:21 xfce-base
drwxr-xr-x          1,340 2014/11/16 16:01:21 xfce-extra

Die Hardware darunter ist gesponsort von Manitu.

16 Nov 2014 3:53pm GMT

Sebastian Pipping: Introducing Gambit to Gentoo

Hi!

I would like to introduce you to Gambit, a rather young Qt-based chess UI with excellent usability and its very own engine.


It has been living in the betagarden overlay while maturing and just hit the Gentoo main repository.
Install through

emerge -av games-board/gambit

as usual.

16 Nov 2014 2:50pm GMT

15 Nov 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Andreas K. Hüttel: RDepending on Perl itself

Writing correct dependency specifications is an art in itself. So, here's a small guide for Gentoo developers how to specify runtime dependencies on dev-lang/perl. First, the general rule.
Check the following two things: 1) is your package linking anywhere to libperl.so, 2) is your package installing any Perl modules into Perl's vendor directory (e.g., /usr/lib64/perl5/vendor_perl/5.20.1/)? If at least one of these two questions is answered with yes, you need in your dependency string a slot operator, i.e. "dev-lang/perl:=" Obviously, your ebuild will have to be EAPI=5 for that. If neither 1) nor 2) are the case, "dev-lang/perl" is enough.
Now, with eclasses. If you use perl-module.eclass or perl-app.eclass, two variables control automatic adding of dependencies. GENTOO_DEPEND_ON_PERL sets whether the eclass automatically adds a dependency on Perl, and defaults to yes in both cases. GENTOO_DEPEND_ON_PERL_SUBSLOT controls whether the slot operator ":=" is used. It defaults to yes in perl-module.eclass and to no in perl-app.eclass. (This is actually the only difference between the eclasses.) The idea behind that is that a Perl module package always installs modules into vendor_dir, while an application can have its own separate installation path for its modules or not install any modules at all.
In many cases, if a package installs Perl modules you'll need Perl at build time as well since the module build system is written in Perl. If a package links to Perl, that is obviously needed at build time too.

So, summarizing:

eclass 1) or 2) true 1) false, 2) false
none "dev-lang/perl:=" needed in RDEPEND and most likely also DEPEND "dev-lang/perl" needed in RDEPEND, maybe also in DEPEND
perl-module.eclass no need to do anything GENTOO_DEPEND_ON_PERL_SUBSLOT=no possible before inherit
perl-app.eclass GENTOO_DEPEND_ON_PERL_SUBSLOT=yes needed before inherit no need to do anything


15 Nov 2014 5:36pm GMT

14 Nov 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter: Gentoo Monthly Newsletter: October 2014

Gentoo News

Council News

The council addressed a number of issues this month. The change with the biggest long-term significance was clearing the way to proceed with the git migration once infra is ready. This included removing changelogs from future git commits, removing cvs headers, and simplifying our news repository format. The infra and git migration projects will coordinate the actual migration hopefully in the not-so-distant future.

The council also endorsed getting rid of herds, but acknowledged that there are some details that need to be worked out before pulling the plug. The bikeshedding was moved back to the lists so all could share in the fun.

There are still some concerns with the games team. The council decided to give the team more time to sort things out internally before interfering. It was acknowledged that most of the serious issues were already resolved with the decision to allow anybody to elect to make their packages a part of the games herd or not. Some QA concerns with some games were brought up, but it was felt that this is best dealt with on a per-package basis with QA/treecleaners and that games shouldn't receive any special treatment one way or the other.

Other decisions include removing einstall from EAPI6, and approving GLEP64 (VDB caching / API). There was also a status update on multilib (nearly done), and migrating project pages to the wiki (sadly we can't just get rid of unmigrated projects like the x86 and amd64 arches).

PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGETS updates

(by Ian Stakenvicius)

On November 7th, packages inheriting python-single-r1 got a whole lot easier for end-users to manage.

It used to be that any package supporting just one Python required it to have a python_single_target_* USE-flag set to choose it, even if the package was only compatible with one Python in the first place. Since November 7th, if a package is only compatible with a single supported Python version (say, python-2.7), then it no longer uses python_single_target_* use flags and relies instead on that implementation being enabled in PYTHON_TARGETS.

The most visible change seen from this is package rebuilds from removal of a lot of PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGET flags, especially on python-2.7-only packages. However, the removal of these flags also means that setting PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGET to something other than python2_7 no longer needs all of those packages to be listed in package.use.

Portage users are also likely to notice that exceptions to PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGET that would require package.use changes are now also be calculated properly by -autounmask, instead of solely being reported as an illegible REQUIRED_USE error.

Gentoo Developer Moves

Summary

Gentoo is made up of 243 active developers, of which 39 are currently away.
Gentoo has recruited a total of 804 developers since its inception.

Changes

Additions

Portage

This section summarizes the current state of the Gentoo ebuild tree.

Architectures 45
Categories 163
Packages 17876
Ebuilds 38009
Architecture Stable Testing Total % of Packages
alpha 3663 592 4255 23.80%
amd64 10926 6462 17388 97.27%
amd64-fbsd 0 1580 1580 8.84%
arm 2709 1812 4521 25.29%
arm64 565 46 611 3.42%
hppa 3103 502 3605 20.17%
ia64 3218 629 3847 21.52%
m68k 624 99 723 4.04%
mips 0 2423 2423 13.55%
ppc 6869 2479 9348 52.29%
ppc64 4381 988 5369 30.03%
s390 1445 376 1821 10.19%
sh 1625 461 2086 11.67%
sparc 4160 921 5081 28.42%
sparc-fbsd 0 319 319 1.78%
x86 11576 5402 16978 94.98%
x86-fbsd 0 3245 3245 18.15%

gmn-portage-stats-2014-11

Security

The following GLSAs have been released by the Security Team

GLSA Package Description Bug
201410-02 perl-core/Locale-Maketext (and 1 more) Perl, Perl Locale-Maketext module: Multiple vulnerabilities 446376
201410-01 app-shells/bash Bash: Multiple vulnerabilities 523742

Package Removals/Additions

Removals

Package Developer Date
media-sound/cowbell k_f 06 Oct 2014
x11-plugins/msn-pecan voyageur 08 Oct 2014
x11-plugins/pidgin-facebookchat voyageur 08 Oct 2014
dev-perl/IO-Socket-IP dilfridge 11 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Template-Latex dilfridge 13 Oct 2014
app-emulation/emul-linux-x86-compat ulm 14 Oct 2014
app-doc/djbdns-man mjo 15 Oct 2014
app-text/unix2dos mjo 18 Oct 2014
app-text/regex idella4 29 Oct 2014
games-board/chessdb mr_bones_ 30 Oct 2014
dev-ml/async_core aballier 30 Oct 2014

Additions

Package Developer Date
net-analyzer/openvas-tools jlec 01 Oct 2014
net-p2p/bitcoin-cli blueness 02 Oct 2014
app-benchmarks/wrk vikraman 02 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Net-IPv4Addr mjo 04 Oct 2014
dev-ruby/compass-core graaff 05 Oct 2014
dev-ruby/compass-import-once graaff 05 Oct 2014
media-sound/apulse jauhien 05 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Test-Warnings zlogene 05 Oct 2014
x11-misc/rofi jer 06 Oct 2014
dev-python/parse alunduil 06 Oct 2014
dev-python/clint alunduil 07 Oct 2014
app-admin/lastpass robbat2 08 Oct 2014
dev-perl/XML-Entities dilfridge 09 Oct 2014
dev-python/Numdifftools jlec 10 Oct 2014
app-text/krop dilfridge 10 Oct 2014
net-voip/vidyodesktop prometheanfire 10 Oct 2014
kde-misc/kcm-touchpad mrueg 11 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Unicode-Normalize dilfridge 11 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Net-IDN-Encode dilfridge 11 Oct 2014
dev-perl/tkispell dilfridge 11 Oct 2014
perl-core/IO-Socket-IP dilfridge 11 Oct 2014
virtual/perl-IO-Socket-IP dilfridge 11 Oct 2014
dev-python/pyhamcrest alunduil 11 Oct 2014
dev-python/enum34 alunduil 11 Oct 2014
dev-db/postgresql titanofold 11 Oct 2014
dev-python/doublex alunduil 11 Oct 2014
dev-python/pycallgraph alunduil 12 Oct 2014
dev-python/python-termstyle alunduil 12 Oct 2014
dev-python/rednose alunduil 12 Oct 2014
dev-python/PyQt5 pesa 13 Oct 2014
net-analyzer/ipguard jer 13 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Template-Plugin-Latex dilfridge 13 Oct 2014
dev-perl/LaTeX-Driver dilfridge 14 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Pod-LaTeX dilfridge 14 Oct 2014
dev-perl/LaTeX-Encode dilfridge 14 Oct 2014
dev-perl/MooseX-FollowPBP dilfridge 14 Oct 2014
dev-perl/LaTeX-Table dilfridge 14 Oct 2014
virtual/perl-Term-ReadLine dilfridge 14 Oct 2014
dev-python/python-etcd zmedico 15 Oct 2014
dev-db/etcd zmedico 15 Oct 2014
dev-libs/extra-cmake-modules kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kglobalaccel kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kwallet kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kjobwidgets kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kxmlgui kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/plasma kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kcrash kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kdesignerplugin kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/frameworkintegration kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kf-env kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kdesu kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/ki18n kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kitemmodels kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kguiaddons kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/knewstuff kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kcoreaddons kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kapidox kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kactivities kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kdelibs4support kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kcmutils kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/sonnet kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kconfig kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kidletime kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kunitconversion kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kio kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kdbusaddons kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kconfigwidgets kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kauth kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kcompletion kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kcodecs kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kpty kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/solid kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kplotting kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kbookmarks kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/knotifyconfig kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kemoticons kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kinit kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kross kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kwidgetsaddons kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kimageformats kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kdewebkit kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kdeclarative kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/attica kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kservice kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kiconthemes kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kdnssd kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kmediaplayer kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/knotifications kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kded kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kjsembed kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kjs kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/ktexteditor kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kdoctools kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/krunner kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kitemviews kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/karchive kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/khtml kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kwindowsystem kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/kparts kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/ktextwidgets kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-frameworks/threadweaver kensington 15 Oct 2014
kde-base/oxygen-fonts kensington 15 Oct 2014
dev-libs/sni-qt mrueg 15 Oct 2014
dev-db/etcdctl zmedico 15 Oct 2014
dev-db/go-etcd zmedico 16 Oct 2014
sys-fs/etcd-fs zmedico 16 Oct 2014
dev-python/mamba alunduil 16 Oct 2014
virtual/podofo-build zmedico 16 Oct 2014
dev-games/goatee hasufell 16 Oct 2014
games-board/goatee-gtk hasufell 16 Oct 2014
app-crypt/etcd-ca zmedico 16 Oct 2014
dev-python/expects alunduil 17 Oct 2014
app-emacs/rust-mode jauhien 18 Oct 2014
app-vim/rust-mode jauhien 18 Oct 2014
app-shells/rust-zshcomp jauhien 18 Oct 2014
dev-lang/rust-bin jauhien 18 Oct 2014
dev-python/args alunduil 18 Oct 2014
sys-process/xjobs mjo 19 Oct 2014
dev-python/parse-type alunduil 19 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Devel-CheckCompiler dilfridge 19 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Cwd-Guard dilfridge 19 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Module-Build-XSUtil dilfridge 19 Oct 2014
dev-perl/File-Find-Rule-Perl dilfridge 19 Oct 2014
dev-perl/PPI-PowerToys dilfridge 19 Oct 2014
dev-util/jenkins-bin mrueg 20 Oct 2014
dev-python/sphinxcontrib-cheeseshop alunduil 21 Oct 2014
dev-perl/BZ-Client dilfridge 21 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Data-Serializer dilfridge 21 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Math-NumberCruncher dilfridge 21 Oct 2014
dev-python/behave alunduil 22 Oct 2014
dev-python/django-opensearch ercpe 22 Oct 2014
app-admin/lastpass-cli zx2c4 22 Oct 2014
dev-python/simpleeval cedk 22 Oct 2014
net-misc/xrdp mgorny 23 Oct 2014
dev-libs/collada-dom aballier 23 Oct 2014
sci-libs/libccd aballier 23 Oct 2014
dev-ml/ocaml-re aballier 24 Oct 2014
dev-ml/cudf aballier 24 Oct 2014
dev-perl/File-ShareDir-Install dilfridge 24 Oct 2014
dev-perl/POSIX-strftime-Compiler dilfridge 24 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Apache-LogFormat-Compiler dilfridge 24 Oct 2014
dev-python/doublex-expects alunduil 25 Oct 2014
app-crypt/libu2f-host flameeyes 25 Oct 2014
app-crypt/libykneomgr flameeyes 25 Oct 2014
app-crypt/yubikey-neo-manager flameeyes 25 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Redis dilfridge 25 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Types-Serialiser dilfridge 25 Oct 2014
net-analyzer/ospd jlec 26 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Cache-FastMmap dilfridge 26 Oct 2014
dev-python/dockerpty alunduil 27 Oct 2014
app-text/restview radhermit 27 Oct 2014
dev-ml/parmap aballier 27 Oct 2014
dev-ml/camlbz2 aballier 27 Oct 2014
net-misc/x11rdp mgorny 27 Oct 2014
app-emulation/fig alunduil 27 Oct 2014
dev-perl/Algorithm-ClusterPoints dilfridge 27 Oct 2014
dev-ml/dose3 aballier 28 Oct 2014
x11-libs/libQGLViewer aballier 28 Oct 2014
dev-ml/cmdliner aballier 29 Oct 2014
dev-ml/uutf aballier 29 Oct 2014
dev-ml/jsonm aballier 29 Oct 2014
dev-ml/opam aballier 29 Oct 2014
sci-libs/octomap aballier 29 Oct 2014
app-text/regex idella4 29 Oct 2014
dev-python/regex idella4 29 Oct 2014
games-rpg/soltys calchan 30 Oct 2014
sci-libs/orocos_kdl aballier 30 Oct 2014
dev-cpp/metslib aballier 31 Oct 2014
media-libs/libsixel hattya 31 Oct 2014
app-crypt/libscrypt blueness 31 Oct 2014
sec-policy/selinux-android swift 31 Oct 2014

Bugzilla

The Gentoo community uses Bugzilla to record and track bugs, notifications, suggestions and other interactions with the development team.

Activity

The following tables and charts summarize the activity on Bugzilla between 01 October 2014 and 01 November 2014. Not fixed means bugs that were resolved as NEEDINFO, WONTFIX, CANTFIX, INVALID or UPSTREAM.
gmn-activity-2014-11

Bug Activity Number
New 1881
Closed 1153
Not fixed 171
Duplicates 168
Total 6198
Blocker 4
Critical 18
Major 65

Closed bug ranking

The following table outlines the teams and developers with the most bugs resolved during this period

Rank Team/Developer Bug Count
1 Gentoo Linux Gnome Desktop Team 50
2 Gentoo Perl team 43
3 Gentoo Games 42
4 Gentoo KDE team 39
5 Gentoo's Team for Core System packages 39
6 Netmon Herd 32
7 Python Gentoo Team 27
8 PHP Bugs 25
9 Gentoo Toolchain Maintainers 21
10 Others 834


gmn-closed-2014-11

Assigned bug ranking

The developers and teams who have been assigned the most bugs during this period are as follows.

Rank Team/Developer Bug Count
1 Gentoo Linux bug wranglers 107
2 Gentoo Linux Gnome Desktop Team 69
3 Gentoo's Team for Core System packages 65
4 Gentoo Security 58
5 Gentoo KDE team 53
6 Python Gentoo Team 49
7 Gentoo Games 47
8 Gentoo Perl team 44
9 Default Assignee for New Packages 43
10 Others 1345


gmn-opened-2014-11

Heard in the community

Send us your favorite Gentoo script or tip at gmn@gentoo.org

Getting Involved?

Interested in helping out? The GMN relies on volunteers and members of the community for content every month. If you are interested in writing for the GMN or thinking of another way to contribute, please send an e-mail to gmn@gentoo.org.

Comments or Suggestions?

Please head over to this forum post.

14 Nov 2014 7:30pm GMT

09 Nov 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Michał Górny: PyPy is back, and for real this time!

As you may recall, I was looking for a dedicated PyPy maintainer for quite some time. Sadly, all the people who helped (and who I'd like to thank a lot) ended up lacking time soon enough. So finally I've decided to look into the hacks reducing build-time memory use and take care of the necessary ebuild and packaging work myself.

So first of all, you may notice that the new PyPy (source-code) ebuilds have a new USE flag called low-memory. When this flag is enabled, the translation process is done using PyPy with some memory-reducing adjustments suggested by upstream. The net result is that it finally is possible to build PyPy with 3.5G RAM (on amd64) and 1G of swap (the latter being used the compiler is spawned and memory used during translation is no longer necessary), at a cost of slightly increased build time.

As noted above, the low-memory option requires using PyPy to perform the translation. So while having to enforce that, I went a bit further and made the ebuild default to using PyPy whenever available. In fact, even for a first PyPy build you are recommended to install dev-python/pypy-bin first and let the ebuild use it to bootstrap your own PyPy.

Next, I have cleaned up the ebuilds a bit and enforced more consistency. Changing maintainers and binary package builders have resulted in the ebuilds being a bit inconsistent. Now you can finally expect pypy-bin to install exactly the same set of files as source-built pypy.

I have also cleaned up the remaining libpypy-c symlinks. The library is not packaged upstream currently, and therefore has no proper public name. Using libpypy-c.so is just wrong, and packages can't reliably refer to that. I'd rather wait with installing it till there's some precedence in renaming. The shared library is still built but it's kept inside the PyPy home directory.

All those changes were followed by a proper version bump to 2.4.0. While you still may have issues upgrading PyPy, Zac already committed a patch to Portage and the next release should be able to handle PyPy upgrades seamlessly. I have also built all the supported binary package variants, so you can choose those if you don't want to spend time building PyPy.

Finally, I have added the ebuilds for PyPy 3. They are a little bit more complex than regular PyPy, especially because the build process and some of the internal modules still require Python 2. Sadly, PyPy 3 is based on Python 3.2 with small backports, so I don't expect package compatibility much greater than CPython 3.2 had.

If you want to try building some packages with PyPy 3, you can use the convenience PYTHON_COMPAT_OVERRIDE hack:

PYTHON_COMPAT_OVERRIDE='pypy3' emerge -1v mypackage

Please note that it is only a hack, and as such it doesn't set proper USE flags (PYTHON_TARGETS are simply ignored) or enforce dependencies.

If someone wants to help PyPy on Gentoo a bit, there are still unsolved issues needing a lot of specialist work. More specifically:

  1. #465546; PyPy needs to be modified to support /usr prefix properly (right now, it requires prefix being /usr/lib*/pypy which breaks distutils packages assuming otherwise.
  2. #525940; non-SSE2 JIT does not build.
  3. #429372; we lack proper sandbox install support.

09 Nov 2014 11:17pm GMT

Patrick Lauer: gentooJoin 2004/04/11

How time flies!
gentooJoin: 2004/04/11

Now I feel ooold

09 Nov 2014 11:06am GMT

05 Nov 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Patrick Lauer: Just a simple webapp, they said ...

The complexity of modern software is quite insanely insane. I just realized ...
Writing a small webapp with flask, I've had to deal with the following technologies/languages:

So that's about a dozen things that each would take years to master. And for a 'small' project there's not much time to learn them deeply, so we staple together what we can, learning as we go along ...

And there's an insane amount of context switching going on, you go from mangling CSS to rewriting SQL in the span of a few minutes. It's an impressive polyglot marathon, but how is this supposed to generate sustainable and high-quality results?

Und then I go home in the evening and play around with OpenCL and such things. Learning never ends - but how are we going to build things that last for more than 6 months? Too many moving parts, too much change, and never enough time to really understand what we're doing :)

05 Nov 2014 8:38am GMT

02 Nov 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Sven Vermeulen: No more DEPENDs for SELinux policy package dependencies

I just finished updating 102 packages. The change? Removing the following from the ebuilds:

DEPEND="selinux? ( sec-policy/selinux-${packagename} )"

In the past, we needed this construction in both DEPEND and RDEPEND. Recently however, the SELinux eclass got updated with some logic to relabel files after the policy package is deployed. As a result, the DEPEND variable no longer needs to refer to the SELinux policy package.

This change also means that for those moving from a regular Gentoo installation to an SELinux installation will have much less packages to rebuild. In the past, getting USE="selinux" (through the SELinux profiles) would rebuild all packages that have a DEPEND dependency to the SELinux policy package. No more - only packages that depend on the SELinux libraries (like libselinux) or utilities rebuild. The rest will just pull in the proper policy package.

02 Nov 2014 12:51pm GMT

31 Oct 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Aaron W. Swenson: EVE Online on Gentoo Linux

Good news, everyone! I'm finally rid of Windows.

A couple weeks ago my Windows installation corrupted itself on the 5 minute trip home from the community theatre. I didn't command it to go to sleep, I just unplugged it and closed the lid. Somehow, it managed to screw up its startup files, and the restore process didn't do what it was supposed to so I was greeted with a blank screen. No errors. Just staring into the void.

I've been using Windows as the sole OS on this machine with Gentoo running in VirtualBox for various reasons related to minor annoyances of unsupported hardware, but as I needed a working machine sooner rather than later and the only tools I could find to solve my Windows problem appeared to be old, defunct, and/or suspicious, I downloaded an ISO of SystemRescueCd (www.sysresccd.org) and installed Gentoo in the sliver of space left on the drive.

There were only two real reasons why I was intent on keeping Windows: Netflix (netflix.com) and EVE Online (eveonline.com). I intended to get Windows up and running once the show was over at the theatre, but then I read about Netflix being supported in Linux (www.mpagano.com). That left me with just one reason to keep Windows: EVE. I turned to Wine (www.winehq.org) and discovered reports of it running EVE quite well (appdb.winehq.org). I also learned that the official Mac OS release of EVE runs on Cider (www.transgaming.com), which is based on Wine.

I had another hitch: I chose the no-multilib stage3 for that original sliver thinking I wouldn't be running anything other than 64 bit software, and drive space was at a premium. EVE Online is 32 bit.

So I had to begin my adventure with switching to multilib. This didn't involve me reinstalling Gentoo thanks to a handy, but unsupported and unofficial, guide (jkroon.blogs.uls.co.za) by Jaco Kroon.

As explained on Multilib System without emul-linux Packages (wiki.gentoo.org), I decided it's better to build my own 32 bit library. So, the next step is to mask the emulation packages:

# /etc/portage/package.mask
app-emulation/emul-linux-x86-*

Because I didn't want to build a 32 bit variant for everything on my system, I iterated through what Portage wanted and marked several packages to build their 32 bit variant via use flags. This is what I wound up with:

# /etc/portage/package.use
app-arch/bzip2 abi_x86_32
app-emulation/wine mono abi_x86_32
dev-libs/elfutils static-libs abi_x86_32
dev-libs/expat abi_x86_32
dev-libs/glib abi_x86_32
dev-libs/gmp abi_x86_32
dev-libs/icu abi_x86_32
dev-libs/libffi abi_x86_32
dev-libs/libgcrypt abi_x86_32
dev-libs/libgpg-error abi_x86_32
dev-libs/libpthread-stubs abi_x86_32
dev-libs/libtasn1 abi_x86_32
dev-libs/libxml2 abi_x86_32
dev-libs/libxslt abi_x86_32
dev-libs/nettle abi_x86_32
dev-util/pkgconfig abi_x86_32
media-libs/alsa-lib abi_x86_32
media-libs/fontconfig abi_x86_32
media-libs/freetype abi_x86_32
media-libs/glu abi_x86_32
media-libs/libjpeg-turbo abi_x86_32
media-libs/libpng abi_x86_32
media-libs/libtxc_dxtn abi_x86_32
media-libs/mesa abi_x86_32
media-libs/openal abi_x86_32
media-sound/mpg123 abi_x86_32
net-dns/avahi abi_x86_32
net-libs/gnutls abi_x86_32
net-print/cups abi_x86_32
sys-apps/dbus abi_x86_32
sys-devel/llvm abi_x86_32
sys-fs/udev gudev abi_x86_32
sys-libs/gdbm abi_x86_32
sys-libs/ncurses abi_x86_32
sys-libs/zlib abi_x86_32
virtual/glu abi_x86_32
virtual/jpeg abi_x86_32
virtual/libffi abi_x86_32
virtual/libiconv abi_x86_32
virtual/libudev abi_x86_32
virtual/opengl abi_x86_32
virtual/pkgconfig abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libX11 abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXau abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXcursor abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXdamage abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXdmcp abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXext abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXfixes abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXi abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXinerama abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXrandr abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXrender abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libXxf86vm abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libdrm abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libvdpau abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libxcb abi_x86_32
x11-libs/libxshmfence abi_x86_32
x11-proto/damageproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/dri2proto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/dri3proto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/fixesproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/glproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/inputproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/kbproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/presentproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/randrproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/renderproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/xcb-proto abi_x86_32 python_targets_python3_4
x11-proto/xextproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/xf86bigfontproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/xf86driproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/xf86vidmodeproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/xineramaproto abi_x86_32
x11-proto/xproto abi_x86_32

Now emerge both Wine - the latest and greatest of course - and the questionable library so textures will be rendered:

emerge -av media-libs/libtxc_dxtn =app-emulation/wine-1.7.29

You may get some messages along the lines of:

emerge: there are no ebuilds to satisfy ">=sys-libs/zlib-1.2.8-r1".

This was a bit of a head scratcher for me. I have syslibs/zlib-1.2.8-r1 installed. I didn't have to accept its keyword. It's already stable! I haven't really looked into why, but you have to accept its keyword to press forward:

# echo '=sys-libs/zlib-1.2.8-r1' >> /etc/portage/package.accept_keywords

You'll have to do the above several times for other packages when you try to emerge Wine. Most of the time the particular version it wants is something you already have installed. Check what you do have installed with eix or other favorite tool so you don't downgrade anything. Once wine is installed, as your user run:

$ winecfg

Download the EVE Online Windows installer and run it using Wine:

$ wine EVE_Online_Installer_*.exe

Once that's done, invoke the launcher as:

$ force_s3tc_enable=true wine 'C:\Program Files (x86)\CCP\EVE\eve.exe'

force_s3tc_enable=true is needed to enable texture rendering. Without it, EVE will freeze during start up. (If you didn't emerge media-libs/libtxc_dxtn, EVE will start, but none of the textures will load, and you'll have a lot of black on black objects.) I didn't have to do any of the other things I've found, such as disabling DirectX 11.

As for my Linux setup: I have a Radeon HD6480G (SUMO/r600) in my ThinkPad Edge E525, and I'm using the open source radeon (www.x.org) drivers with graphics on high and medium anti-aliasing with Mesa and OpenGL. For the most part, I find the game play to be smooth and indistinguishable from my experience on Windows.

There are a few things that don't work well. Psychedelic, rendering artifacts galore when I open the in-game browser (IGB) or switch to another application, but that's resolve without logging out of EVE by changing the graphics quality to something else. It may be related to resource caching, but I need to do more testing. I haven't tried going into the Captain's Quarters (other users have reported crashes entering there) as back on Windows that brings my system to a crawl, and there isn't anything particularly interesting about going in there…yet.

Overall, I'm quite happy with the EVE/Wine experience on Gentoo. It was quite easy and there wasn't any real troubleshooting for me to do.

If you're a fellow Gentoo-er in EVE, drop me a line. If you want to give EVE a go, have an extra week on me.

Update: I've been informed by Aatos Taavi that running EVE in windowed mode works quite well. I've also been informed that we need to declare stable packages in portage.accept_keywords because abi_x86_32 is use masked.

31 Oct 2014 4:56pm GMT

30 Oct 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Diego E. Pettenò: On professionalism (my first and last post explicitly about systemd)

I have been trying my best not to comment on systemd one way or another for a while. For the most part because I don't want to have a trollfest on my blog, because moderating it is something I hate and I'm sure would be needed. On the other hand it seems like people start to bring me in the conversation now from time to time.

What I would like to point out at this point is that both extreme sides of the vision are, in my opinion, behaving childishly and being totally unprofessional. Whether it is name-calling of the people or the software, death threats, insults, satirical websites, labeling of 300 people for a handful of them, etc.

I don't think I have been as happy to have a job that allows me not to care about open source as much as I did before as in the past few weeks as things keep escalating and escalating. You guys are the worst. And again I refer to both supporters and detractors, devs of systemd, devs of eudev, Debian devs and Gentoo devs, and so on so forth.

And the reason why I say this is because you both want to bring this to extremes that I think are totally uncalled for. I don't see the world in black and white and I think I said that before. Gray is nuanced and interesting, and needs skills to navigate, so I understand it's easier to just take a stand and never revise your opinion, but the easy way is not what I care about.

Myself, I decided to migrate my non-server systems to systemd a few months ago. It works fine. I've considered migrating my servers, and I decided for the moment to wait. The reason is technical for the most part: I don't think I trust the stability promises for the moment and I don't reboot servers that often anyway.

There are good things to the systemd design. And I'm sure that very few people will really miss sysvinit as is. Most people, especially in Gentoo, have not been using sysvinit properly, but rather through OpenRC, which shares more spirit with systemd than sysv, either by coincidence or because they are just the right approach to things (declarativeness to begin with).

At the same time, I don't like Lennart's approach on this to begin with, and I don't think it's uncalled for to criticize the product based on the person in this case, as the two are tightly coupled. I don't like moderating people away from a discussion, because it just ends up making the discussion even more confrontational on the next forum you stumble across them - this is why I never blacklisted Ciaran and friends from my blog even after a group of them started pasting my face on pictures of nazi soldiers from WW2. Yes I agree that Gentoo has a good chunk of toxic supporters, I wish we got rid of them a long while ago.

At the same time, if somebody were to try to categorize me the same way as the people who decided to fork udev without even thinking of what they were doing, I would want to point out that I was reproaching them from day one for their absolutely insane (and inane) starting announcement and first few commits. And I have not been using it ever, since for the moment they seem to have made good on the promise of not making it impossible to run udev without systemd.

I don't agree with the complete direction right now, and especially with the one-size-fit-all approach (on either side!) that tries to reduce the "software biodiversity". At the same time there are a few designs that would be difficult for me to attack given that they were ideas of mine as well, at some point. Such as the runtime binary approach to hardware IDs (that Greg disagreed with at the time and then was implemented by systemd/udev), or the usage of tmpfs ACLs to allow users at the console to access devices - which was essentially my original proposal to get rid of pam_console (that played with owners instead, making it messy when having more than one user at console), when consolekit and its groups-fiddling was introduced (groups can be used for setgid, not a good idea).

So why am I posting this? Mostly to tell everybody out there that if you plan on using me for either side point to be brought home, you can forget about it. I'll probably get pissed off enough to try to prove the exact opposite, and then back again.

Neither of you is perfectly right. You both make mistake. And you both are unprofessional. Try to grow up.

Edit: I mistyped eudev in the original article and it read euscan. Sorry Corentin, was thinking one thing and typing another.

30 Oct 2014 6:46pm GMT

Sven Vermeulen: Migrating to SELinux userspace 2.4 (small warning for users)

In a few moments, SELinux users which have the ~arch KEYWORDS set (either globally or for the SELinux utilities in particular) will notice that the SELinux userspace will upgrade to version 2.4 (release candidate 5 for now). This upgrade comes with a manual step that needs to be performed after upgrade. The information is mentioned as post-installation message of the policycoreutils package, and basically sais that you need to execute:

~# /usr/libexec/selinux/semanage_migrate_store

The reason is that the SELinux utilities expect the SELinux policy module store (and the semanage related files) to be in /var/lib/selinux and no longer in /etc/selinux. Note that this does not mean that the SELinux policy itself is moved outside of that location, nor is the basic configuration file (/etc/selinux/config). It is what tools such as semanage manage that is moved outside that location.

I tried to automate the migration as part of the packages themselves, but this would require the portage_t domain to be able to move, rebuild and load policies, which it can't (and to be honest, shouldn't). Instead of augmenting the policy or making updates to the migration script as delivered by the upstream project, we currently decided to have the migration done manually. It is a one-time migration anyway.

If for some reason end users forget to do the migration, then that does not mean that the system breaks or becomes unusable. SELinux still works, SELinux aware applications still work; the only thing that will fail are updates on the SELinux configuration through tools like semanage or setsebool - the latter when you want to persist boolean changes.

~# semanage fcontext -l
ValueError: SELinux policy is not managed or store cannot be accessed.
~# setsebool -P allow_ptrace on
Cannot set persistent booleans without managed policy.

If you get those errors or warnings, all that is left to do is to do the migration. Note in the following that there is a warning about 'else' blocks that are no longer supported: that's okay, as far as I know (and it was mentioned on the upstream mailinglist as well as not something to worry about) it does not have any impact.

~# /usr/libexec/selinux/semanage_migrate_store
Migrating from /etc/selinux/mcs/modules/active to /var/lib/selinux/mcs/active
Attempting to rebuild policy from /var/lib/selinux
sysnetwork: Warning: 'else' blocks in optional statements are unsupported in CIL. Dropping from output.

You can also add in -c so that the old policy module store is cleaned up. You can also rerun the command multiple times:

~# /usr/libexec/selinux/semanage_migrate_store -c
warning: Policy type mcs has already been migrated, but modules still exist in the old store. Skipping store.
Attempting to rebuild policy from /var/lib/selinux

You can manually clean up the old policy module store like so:

~# rm -rf /etc/selinux/mcs/modules

So… don't worry - the change is small and does not break stuff. And for those wondering about CIL I'll talk about it in one of my next posts.

30 Oct 2014 5:44pm GMT

26 Oct 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Diego E. Pettenò: Packaging for the Yubikey NEO, a frustrating adventure

I have already posted a howto on how to set up the YubiKey NEO and YubiKey NEO-n for U2F, and I promised I would write a bit more on the adventure to get the software packaged in Gentoo.

You have to realize at first that my relationship with Yubico has not always being straightforward. I have at least once decided against working on the Yubico set of libraries in Gentoo because I could not get a hold of a device as I wanted to use it. But luckily now I was able to place an order with them (for some two thousands euro) and I have my devices.

But Yubico's code is usually quite well written, and designed to be packaged much more easily than most other device-specific middleware, so I cannot complain too much. Indeed, they split and release separately different libraries with different goals, so that you don't need to wait for enough magnitude to be pulled for them to make a new release. They also actively maintain their code in GitHub, and then push proper make dist releases on their website. They are in many ways a packager's dream company.

But let's get back to the devices themselves. The NEO and NEO-n come with three different interfaces: OTP (old-style YubiKey, just much longer keys), CCID (Smartcard interface) and U2F. By default the devices are configured as OTP only, which I find a bit strange to be honest. It is also the case that at the moment you cannot enable both U2F and OTP modes, I assume because there is a conflict on how the "touch" interaction behaves, indeed there is a touch-based interaction on the CCID mode that gets entirely disabled once enabling either of U2F or OTP, but the two can't share.

What is not obvious from the website is that to enable U2F (or CCID) modes, you need to use yubikey-neo-manager, an open-source app that can reconfigure the basics of the Yubico device. So I had to package the app for Gentoo of course, together with its dependencies, which turned out to be two libraries (okay actually three, but the third one sys-auth/ykpers was already packaged in Gentoo - and actually originally committed by me with Brant proxy-maintaining it, the world is small, sometimes). It was not too bad but there were a few things that might be worth noting down.

First of all, I had to deal with dev-libs/hidapi that allows programmatic access to raw HID USB devices: the ebuild failed for me, both because it was not depending on udev, and because it was unable to find the libusb headers - turned out to be caused by bashisms in the configure.ac file, which became obvious as I moved to dash. I have now fixed the ebuild and sent a pull request upstream.

This was the only real hard part at first, since the rest of the ebuilds, for app-crypt/libykneomgr and app-crypt/yubikey-neo-manager were mostly straightforward ­- only I had to figure out how to install a Python package as I never did so before. It's actually fun how distutils will error out with a violation of install paths if easy_install tries to bring in a non-installed package such as nose, way before the Portage sandbox triggers.

The problems started when trying to use the programs, doubly so because I don't keep a copy of the Gentoo tree on the laptop, so I wrote the ebuilds on the headless server and then tried to run them on the actual hardware. First of all, you need to have access to the devices to be able to set them up; the libu2f-host package will install udev rules to allow the plugdev group access to the hidraw devices ­- but it also needed a pull request to fix them. I also added an alternative version of the rules for systemd users that does not rely on the group but rather uses the ACL support (I was surprised, I essentially suggested the same approach to replace pam_console years ago!)

Unfortunately that only works once the device is already set in U2F mode, which does not work when you're setting up the NEO for the first time, so I originally set it up using kdesu. I have since decided that the better way is to use the udev rules I posted in my howto post.

After this, I switched off OTP, and enabled U2F and CCID interfaces on the device - and I couldn't make it stick, the manager would keep telling me that the CCID interface was disabled, even though the USB descriptor properly called it "Yubikey NEO U2F+CCID". It took me a while to figure out that the problem was in the app-crypt/ccid driver, and indeed the change log for the latest version points out support for specifically the U2F+CCID device.

I have updated the ebuilds afterwards, not only to depend on the right version of the CCID driver - the README for libykneomgr does tell you to install pcsc-lite but not about the CCID driver you need - but also to check for the HIDRAW kernel driver, as otherwise you won't be able to either configure or use the U2F device for non-Google domains.

Now there is one more part of the story that needs to be told, but in a different post: getting GnuPG to work with the OpenPGP applet on the NEO-n. It was not as straightforward as it could have been and it did lead to disappointment. I'll be a good post for next week.

26 Oct 2014 5:56pm GMT

25 Oct 2014

feedPlanet Gentoo

Diego E. Pettenò: Setting up Yubikey NEO and U2F on Gentoo (and Linux in general)

When the Google Online Security blog announced earlier this week the general availability of Security Key, everybody at the office was thrilled, as we've been waiting for the day for a while. I've been using this for a while already, and my hope is for it to be easy enough for my mother and my sister, as well as my friends, to start using it.

While the promise is for a hassle-free second factor authenticator, it turns out it might not be as simple as originally intended, at least on Linux, at least right now.

Let's start with the hardware, as there are four different options of hardware that you can choose from:

I got the NEO, but mostly to be used with LastPass ­- the NFC support allows you to have 2FA on the phone without having to type it back from a computer - and a NEO-n to leave installed on one of my computers. I already had a NEO from work to use as well. The NEO requires configuration, so I'll get back at it in a moment.

The U2F devices are accessible via hidraw, a driverless access protocol for USB devices, originally intended for devices such as keyboards and mice but also leveraged by UPSes. What happen though is that you need access to the device, that the Linux kernel will make by default accessible only by root, for good reasons.

To make the device accessible to you, the user actually at the keyboard of the computer, you have to use udev rules, and those are, as always, not straightforward. My personal hacky choice is to make all the Yubico devices accessible - the main reason being that I don't know all of the compatible USB Product IDs, as some of them are not really available to buy but come from instance from developer mode devices that I may or may not end up using.

If you're using systemd with device ACLs (in Gentoo, that would be sys-apps/systemd with acl USE flag enabled), you can do it with a file as follows:

# /etc/udev/rules.d/90-u2f-securitykey.rules
ATTRS{idVendor}=="1050", TAG+="uaccess"
ATTRS{idVendor}=="2581", ATTRS{idProduct}=="f1d0", TAG+="uaccess"

If you're not using systemd or ACLs, you can use the plugdev group and instead do it this way:

# /etc/udev/rules.d/90-u2f-securitykey.rules
ATTRS{idVendor}=="1050", GROUP="plugdev", MODE="0660"
ATTRS{idVendor}=="2581", ATTRS{idProduct}=="f1d0", GROUP="plugdev", MODE="0660"

-These rules do not include support for the Plug-up because I have no idea what their VID/PID pairs are, I asked Janne who got one so I can amend this later.- Edit: added the rules for the Plug-up device. Cute their use of f1d0 as device id.

Also note that there are properly less hacky solutions to get the ownership of the devices right, but I'll leave it to the systemd devs to figure out how to include in the default ruleset.

These rules will not only allow your user to access /dev/hidraw0 but also to the /dev/bus/usb/* devices. This is intentional: Chrome (and Chromium, the open-source version works as well) use the U2F devices in two different modes: one is through a built-in extension that works with Google assets, and it accesses the low-level device as /dev/bus/usb/*, the other is through a Chrome extension which uses /dev/hidraw* and is meant to be used by all websites. The latter is the actually standardized specification and how you're supposed to use it right now. I don't know if the former workflow is going to be deprecated at some point, but I wouldn't be surprised.

For those like me who bought the NEO devices, you'll have to enable the U2F mode - while Yubico provides the linked step-by-step guide, it was not really completely correct for me on Gentoo, but it should be less complicated now: I packaged the app-crypt/yubikey-neo-manager app, which already brings in all the necessary software, including the latest version of app-crypt/ccid required to use the CCID interface on U2F-enabled NEOs. And if you already created the udev rules file as I noted above, it'll work without you using root privileges. Just remember that if you are interested in the OpenPGP support you'll need the pcscd service (it should auto-start with both OpenRC and systemd anyway).

I'll recount separately the issues with packaging the software. In the mean time make sure you keep your accounts safe, and let's all hope that more sites will start protecting your accounts with U2F - I'll also write a separate opinion piece on why U2F is important and why it is better than OTP, this is just meant as documentation, howto set up the U2F devices on your Linux systems.

25 Oct 2014 10:37pm GMT

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter: Gentoo Monthly Newsletter: September 2014

Gentoo News

Council News

The september council meeting was quite uneventful. The only outcome of note was that the dohtml function for ebuilds will be deprecated now and banned in a later EAPI, with some internal consequences for, e.g., einstalldocs.

Releases

New LiveDVD - Iron Penguin Edition thanks to the Gentoo Infrastructure team and Fernando Reyes. If you haven't yet checked it out, what are you waiting for? Go get it on your closest mirror.

Gentoo Miniconf 2014

(shameless copy of Tomas Chvatal's report on the gentoo-project mailing list)

Hello guys,

First I would like to say big thank you to Amy (amynka) for prodding and nudging people and working on the booth. Next in line is Christopher (chithead) whom also handled our booth and even brought with him fancy MIPS machine and monitor all the way from Berlin. Kudos for that. And last I want to commend all the people giving the talks during the day. In the end we did bit Q&A with users, which was short so rest I spent asking how we should do the miniconf and what would be desired. So first lets take look on what we had and what we can do there to make it even cooler for next time:

Booth

Place where we share/sell SWAG chat with community. People stopped by, took some stickers here and there and watched the MIPS boxie we had there. I have to admit that I screwed up with our materials a bit and we didn't have much on the stand. I thought we have more leftover stickers/brochures, but we had just few and super plan to get Gentoo t-shirts failed me miserably…

Future possibilities

Someone from Gentoo ev. could arrive too and actually sell some stuff like cups/tshirts as we seem unable to get something working here in Czech republic. With that we would have really pretty booth. People were quite interested in our merchandise and are even willing to buy it.

Track

We had one day of talks, and basically everything went smoothly and videos will be available in near future on youtube. I will try to remember to post link here as reply when it is done (if it is not here in a week, prod me on irc because that means I forgot).

Future possibilities

We should make the thing 2 days, so it is worth for people to go to Prague, for one day I guess it is not that motivating. We should start looking for talks sooner than couple of months in advance so people can plan for it.

Overall state/possibilities

First here are photos:
http://www.root.cz/galerie/linuxdays-2014-sobota/
http://www.root.cz/galerie/linuxdays-2014-nedele/

Linuxdays people are more than happy to provide us with the room if we have the content. Most of the people attending to the conference speak english, so even tho quite parts of the tracks are czech, we can talk with the people around. We could do it yearly/bi-yearly, my take would be to create 2 days miniconf each two year, so next one could be done 2016 unless of course you want it next year again and tell me right now

Gentoo Developer Moves

Summary

Gentoo is made up of 242 active developers, of which 43 are currently away.
Gentoo has recruited a total of 803 developers since its inception.

Changes

Portage

This section summarizes the current state of the portage tree.

Architectures 45
Categories 162
Packages 17722
Ebuilds 37899
Architecture Stable Testing Total % of Packages
alpha 3661 582 4243 23.94%
amd64 10915 6318 17233 97.24%
amd64-fbsd 0 1573 1573 8.88%
arm 2701 1773 4474 25.25%
arm64 569 34 603 3.40%
hppa 3097 490 3587 20.24%
ia64 3213 627 3840 21.67%
m68k 612 98 710 4.01%
mips 0 2419 2419 13.65%
ppc 6866 2460 9326 52.62%
ppc64 4369 969 5338 30.12%
s390 1458 355 1813 10.23%
sh 1646 432 2078 11.73%
sparc 4156 916 5072 28.62%
sparc-fbsd 0 316 316 1.78%
x86 11564 5361 16925 95.50%
x86-fbsd 0 3238 3238 18.27%

gmn-portage-stats-2014-10

Security

The following GLSAs have been released by the Security Team

GLSA Package Description Bug
201409-10 app-shells/bash Bash: Code Injection (Updated fix for GLSA 201409-09) 523592
201409-09 app-shells/bash Bash: Code Injection 523592
201409-08 dev-libs/libxml2 libxml2: Denial of Service 509834
201409-07 net-proxy/c-icap c-icap: Denial of Service 455324
201409-06 www-client/chromium Chromium: Multiple vulnerabilities 522484
201409-05 www-plugins/adobe-flash Adobe Flash Player: Multiple vulnerabilities 522448
201409-04 dev-db/mysql MySQL: Multiple vulnerabilities 460748
201409-03 net-misc/dhcpcd dhcpcd: Denial of service 518596
201409-02 net-analyzer/net-snmp Net-SNMP: Denial of Service 431752
201409-01 net-analyzer/wireshark Wireshark: Multiple vulnerabilities 519014

Package Removals/Additions

Removals

Package Developer Date
dev-python/amara dev-zero 07 Sep 2014
dev-python/Bcryptor pacho 07 Sep 2014
dev-python/Yamlog pacho 07 Sep 2014
app-crypt/opencdk pacho 07 Sep 2014
net-dialup/gnome-ppp pacho 07 Sep 2014
media-plugins/vdr-dxr3 pacho 07 Sep 2014
media-video/dxr3config pacho 07 Sep 2014
media-video/em8300-libraries pacho 07 Sep 2014
media-video/em8300-modules pacho 07 Sep 2014
net-misc/xsupplicant pacho 07 Sep 2014
www-apache/mod_lisp2 pacho 07 Sep 2014
dev-python/py-gnupg pacho 07 Sep 2014
media-sound/decibel-audio-player pacho 07 Sep 2014
sys-power/gtk-cpuspeedy pacho 07 Sep 2014
app-emulation/emul-linux-x86-glibc-errno-compat pacho 07 Sep 2014
sys-fs/chironfs pacho 07 Sep 2014
net-p2p/giftui pacho 07 Sep 2014
app-misc/discomatic pacho 07 Sep 2014
x11-misc/uf-view pacho 07 Sep 2014
games-action/minetest_build hasufell 09 Sep 2014
games-action/minetest_common hasufell 09 Sep 2014
games-action/minetest_survival hasufell 09 Sep 2014
www-client/opera-next jer 15 Sep 2014
www-apps/swish-e dilfridge 19 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qcustomplot jlec 29 Sep 2014

Additions

Package Developer Date
dev-ruby/typhoeus graaff 01 Sep 2014
dev-python/toolz patrick 02 Sep 2014
dev-python/cytoolz patrick 02 Sep 2014
dev-python/unicodecsv patrick 02 Sep 2014
dev-python/characteristic idella4 02 Sep 2014
dev-python/service_identity idella4 02 Sep 2014
dev-libs/gom pacho 02 Sep 2014
games-roguelike/mazesofmonad hasufell 02 Sep 2014
dev-ruby/ast mrueg 04 Sep 2014
dev-ruby/cliver mrueg 04 Sep 2014
dev-ruby/parser mrueg 04 Sep 2014
dev-ruby/astrolabe mrueg 04 Sep 2014
net-ftp/pybootd vapier 04 Sep 2014
net-analyzer/nbwmon jer 04 Sep 2014
net-misc/megatools dlan 05 Sep 2014
dev-python/placefinder idella4 06 Sep 2014
dev-python/flask-cors idella4 09 Sep 2014
app-crypt/crackpkcs12 vapier 10 Sep 2014
dev-qt/linguist-tools pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qdbus pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qdoc pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtconcurrent pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtdiag pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtgraphicaleffects pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtimageformats pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtnetwork pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtpaths pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtprintsupport pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtquick1 pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtquickcontrols pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtserialport pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qttranslations pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtwebsockets pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtwidgets pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtx11extras pesa 11 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtxml pesa 11 Sep 2014
www-client/otter jer 13 Sep 2014
dev-util/pycharm-community xmw 14 Sep 2014
dev-util/pycharm-professional xmw 14 Sep 2014
media-libs/libgltf dilfridge 14 Sep 2014
www-client/opera-beta jer 15 Sep 2014
dev-libs/libbase58 blueness 15 Sep 2014
net-libs/courier-unicode hanno 16 Sep 2014
dev-libs/bareos-fastlzlib mschiff 16 Sep 2014
sys-libs/nss-usrfiles ryao 17 Sep 2014
sys-cluster/poolmon mschiff 18 Sep 2014
dev-python/pyClamd xmw 20 Sep 2014
sci-libs/htslib jlec 20 Sep 2014
dev-python/pika xarthisius 21 Sep 2014
games-rpg/wasteland2 hasufell 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-lib-common alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-backup-sqlite alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-backup-pgdump alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-backup-example alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-backup-random alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-lib-lvm alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-lib-mysql alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-backup-mysqldump alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-backup-mysqlhotcopy alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-backup-mysql-lvm alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland-backup-mysql-meta alunduil 21 Sep 2014
app-backup/holland alunduil 21 Sep 2014
net-libs/libndp pacho 22 Sep 2014
dev-python/keystonemiddleware prometheanfire 22 Sep 2014
media-libs/libbdplus beandog 22 Sep 2014
dev-python/texttable alunduil 23 Sep 2014
dev-perl/IMAP-BodyStructure chainsaw 25 Sep 2014
net-libs/uhttpmock pacho 25 Sep 2014
dev-perl/Data-Validate-IP chainsaw 25 Sep 2014
dev-perl/Data-Validate-Domain chainsaw 25 Sep 2014
dev-perl/Template-Plugin-Cycle chainsaw 25 Sep 2014
dev-perl/XML-Directory chainsaw 25 Sep 2014
dev-python/treq ryao 25 Sep 2014
dev-python/eliot ryao 25 Sep 2014
dev-python/xcffib idella4 26 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtsensors pesa 26 Sep 2014
dev-python/path-py floppym 27 Sep 2014
dev-perl/Archive-Extract dilfridge 27 Sep 2014
dev-python/requests-mock alunduil 27 Sep 2014
dev-libs/appstream-glib eva 27 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qtpositioning pesa 28 Sep 2014
dev-qt/qcustomplot jlec 28 Sep 2014
dev-perl/Data-Structure-Util dilfridge 28 Sep 2014
dev-perl/IO-Event dilfridge 28 Sep 2014
dev-libs/qcustomplot jlec 29 Sep 2014
dev-python/webassets yngwin 30 Sep 2014
dev-python/google-apputils idella4 30 Sep 2014
dev-python/pyinsane voyageur 30 Sep 2014
dev-python/pyocr voyageur 30 Sep 2014
app-text/paperwork voyageur 30 Sep 2014

Bugzilla

The Gentoo community uses Bugzilla to record and track bugs, notifications, suggestions and other interactions with the development team.

Activity

The following tables and charts summarize the activity on Bugzilla between 01 September 2014 and 01 October 2014. Not fixed means bugs that were resolved as NEEDINFO, WONTFIX, CANTFIX, INVALID or UPSTREAM.
gmn-activity-2014-10

Bug Activity Number
New 1196
Closed 769
Not fixed 175
Duplicates 136
Total 6132
Blocker 5
Critical 17
Major 66

Closed bug ranking

The following table outlines the teams and developers with the most bugs resolved during this period

Rank Team/Developer Bug Count
1 Gentoo Security 49
2 Gentoo Linux Gnome Desktop Team 38
3 Python Gentoo Team 21
4 Qt Bug Alias 20
5 Perl Devs @ Gentoo 20
6 Gentoo KDE team 20
7 Portage team 19
8 Gentoo Games 17
9 Netmon Herd 16
10 Others 548


gmn-closed-2014-10

Assigned bug ranking

The developers and teams who have been assigned the most bugs during this period are as follows.

Rank Team/Developer Bug Count
1 Gentoo Linux bug wranglers 92
2 Gentoo Security 62
3 Gentoo Linux Gnome Desktop Team 59
4 Gentoo's Team for Core System packages 39
5 Gentoo Games 37
6 Portage team 33
7 Python Gentoo Team 32
8 Gentoo KDE team 32
9 Perl Devs @ Gentoo 27
10 Others 782


gmn-opened-2014-10

Tip of the month

(thanks to Thomas D. for the link to the blog post)

In case you like messing with your kernel Kconfig options to tweak the kernel image for your Gentoo boxes, you may want to know that menuconfig accepts regular expressions for searching symbols. You can start the search by typing '/'. For example, if you want to find all symbols ending with PCI do something like this after pressing '/'.

PCI$

You get a bunch of results, and then you can press the number listed on the left to jump directly to that symbol.

Related references:

http://michaelmk.blogspot.de/2014/08/jumping-directly-into-found-results-in.html

https://plus.google.com/101327154101389327284/posts/MyrhGjng1rQ

Heard in the community

Send us your favorite Gentoo script or tip at gmn@gentoo.org

Getting Involved?

Interested in helping out? The GMN relies on volunteers and members of the community for content every month. If you are interested in writing for the GMN or thinking of another way to contribute, please send an e-mail to gmn@gentoo.org.

Comments or Suggestions?

Please head over to this forum post.

25 Oct 2014 9:10am GMT