15 Apr 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Gentoo Haskell Herd: GHC as a cross-compiler update

TL;DR:

Gentoo's dev-lang/ghc-8.2.1_rc1 supports both cross-building and cross-compiling modes! It's useful for cross-compiling haskell software and initial porting of GHC itself on a new gentoo target.

Building a GHC crossompiler on Gentoo

Getting ${CTARGET}-ghc (crosscompiler) on Gentoo:

# # convenience variables:
CTARGET=powerpc64-unknown-linux-gnu
#
# # Installing a target toolchain: gcc, glibc, binutils
crossdev ${CTARGET}
# # Installing ghc dependencies:
emerge-${CTARGET} -1 libffi ncurses gmp
#
# # adding 'ghc' symlink to cross-overlay:
ln -s path/to/haskell/overlay/dev-lang/ghc part/to/cross/overlay/cross-${CTARGET}/ghc
#
# # Building ghc crosscompiler:
emerge -1 cross-${CTARGET}/ghc
#
powerpc64-unknown-linux-gnu-ghc --info | grep Target
# ,("Target platform","powerpc64-unknown-linux")

Cross-building GHC on Gentoo

Cross-building ghc on ${CTARGET}:

# # convenience variables:
CTARGET=powerpc64-unknown-linux-gnu
#
# # Installing a target toolchain: gcc, glibc, binutils
crossdev ${CTARGET}
# # Installing ghc dependencies:
emerge-${CTARGET} -1 libffi ncurses gmp
#
# # Cross-building ghc crosscompiler:
emerge-${CTARGET} --buildpkg -1 dev-lang/ghc
#
# # Now built packages can be used on a target to install
# # built ghc as: emerge --usepkg -1 dev-lang/ghc

Building a GHC crossompiler (generic)

That's how you get a powerpc64 crosscompiler in a fresh git checkout:

$ ./configure --target=powerpc64-unknown-linux-gnu
$ cat mk/build.mk
HADDOCK_DOCS=NO
BUILD_SPHINX_HTML=NO
BUILD_SPHINX_PDF=NO
# to speed things up
BUILD_PROF_LIBS=NO
$ make -j$(nproc)
$ inplace/bin/ghc-stage1 --info | grep Target
,("Target platform","powerpc64-unknown-linux")

Simple!

Below are details that have only historical (or backporting) value.

How did we get there?

Cross-compiling support in GHC is not a new thing. GHC wiki has a detailed section on how to build a crosscompiler. That works quite good. You can even target ghc at m68k: porting example.

What did not work so well is the attempt to install the result! In some places GHC build system tried to run ghc-pkg built for ${CBUILD}, in some places for ${CHOST}.

I never really tried to install a crosscompiler before. I think mostly because I was usually happy to make cross-compiler build at all: making GHC build for a rare target usually required a patch or two.

But one day I've decided to give full install a run. Original motivation was a bit unusual: I wanted to free space on my hard drive.

The build tree for GHC usually takes about 6-8GB. I had about 15 GHC source trees lying around. All in all it took about 10% of all space on my hard drive. Fixing make install would allow me to install only final result and get rid of all intermediate files.

I've decided to test make install code on Gentoo's dev-lang/ghc package as a proper package.

As a result a bunch of minor cleanups happened:

What works?

It allowed me to test various targets. Namely:

Target Bits Endianness Codegen
cross-aarch64-unknown-linux-gnu/ghc 64 LE LLVM
cross-alpha-unknown-linux-gnu/ghc 64 LE UNREG
cross-armv7a-unknown-linux-gnueabi/ghc 32 LE LLVM
cross-hppa-unknown-linux-gnu/ghc 32 BE UNREG
cross-m68k-unknown-linux-gnu/ghc 32 BE UNREG
cross-mips64-unknown-linux-gnu/ghc 32/64 BE UNREG
cross-powerpc64-unknown-linux-gnu/ghc 64 BE NCG
cross-powerpc64le-unknown-linux-gnu/ghc 64 LE NCG
cross-s390x-unknown-linux-gnu/ghc 64 BE UNREG
cross-sparc-unknown-linux-gnu/ghc 32 BE UNREG
cross-sparc64-unknown-linux-gnu/ghc 64 BE UNREG

I am running all of this on x86_64 (64-bit LE platform)

Quite a list! With help of qemu we can even test whether cross-compiler produces something that works:

$ cat hi.hs 
main = print "hello!"
$ powerpc64le-unknown-linux-gnu-ghc hi.hs -o hi.ppc64le
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( hi.hs, hi.o )
Linking hi.ppc64le ...
$ file hi.ppc64le 
hi.ppc64le: ELF 64-bit LSB executable, 64-bit PowerPC or cisco 7500, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked, interpreter /lib64/ld64.so.2, for GNU/Linux 3.2.0, not stripped
$ qemu-ppc64le -L /usr/powerpc64le-unknown-linux-gnu/ ./hi.ppc64le 
"hello!"

Many qemu targets are slightly buggy and usually are very easy to fix!

A few recent examples:

Tweaking qemu is fun 🙂


15 Apr 2017 11:05am GMT

10 Apr 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Alexys Jacob: py3status v3.5

Howdy folks,

I'm obviously slacking a bit on my blog and I'm ashamed to say that it's not the only place where I do. py3status is another of them and it wouldn't be the project it is today without @tobes.

In fact, this new 3.5 release has witnessed his takeover on the top contributions on the project, so I want to extend a warm thank you and lots of congratulations on this my friend 🙂

Also, an amazing new contributor from the USA has come around in the nickname of @lasers. He has been doing a tremendous job on module normalization, code review and feedbacks. His high energy is amazing and more than welcome.

This release is mainly his, so thank you @lasers !

What's new ?

Well the changelog has never been so large that I even don't know where to start. I guess the most noticeable change is the gorgeous and brand new documentation of py3status on readthedocs !

Apart from the enhanced guides and sections, what's amazing behind this new documentation is the level of automation efforts that @lasers and @tobes put into it. They even generate modules' screenshots programmatically ! I would never have thought of it possible 😀

The other main efforts on this release is about modules normalization where @lasers put so much energy in taking advantage of the formatter features and bringing all the modules to a new level of standardization. This long work brought to light some lack of features or bugs which got corrected along the way.

Last but not least, the way py3status notifies you when modules fail to load/execute got changed. Now modules which fail to load or execute will not pop up a notification (i3 nagbar or dbus) but display directly in the bar where they belong. Users can left click to show the error and right click to discard them from their bar !

New modules

Once again, new and recurring contributors helped the project get better and offer a cool set of modules, thank you contributors !

Special mention to @maximbaz for his continuous efforts and help. And also a special community mention to @valdur55 for his responsiveness and help for other users on IRC !

What's next ?

The 3.6 version will focus on the following ideas, some sane and some crazy 🙂

Stay tuned

10 Apr 2017 10:19am GMT

25 Mar 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Andreas K. Hüttel: Testers wanted for Gentoo Perl 5.24.1 stabilization

We want to stabilize Perl 5.24 on Gentoo pretty soon (meaning in a few weeks), and do actually not expect any big surprises there. If you are running a stable installation, are willing to do some testing, and are familiar with our Gentoo bugzilla and with filing bug reports, then you might just be the right volunteer to give it a try in advance!

Here's what to do:

Step 1: Update app-admin/perl-cleaner to current ~arch.
I'm deliberately not supplying any version number here, since I might do another release, but you should at least have perl-cleaner-2.25.

Step 2: Make sure your system is uptodate (emerge -uDNav world) and do a depclean step (emerge --depclean --ask).

Step 3: Download the current stabilization list from bug 604602 and place it into your /etc/portage/package.keywords or /etc/portage/package.accept_keywords.

Step 4: Update your world (emerge -uDNav world), which triggers the perl update and the module rebuild.

Step 5: Run "perl-cleaner --all" (you might also want to try "perl-cleaner --all --delete-leftovers").

... and make sure you file bugs for any problems you encounter, during the update and afterwards! Feedback is also appreciated if all goes fine; then you best leave a comment here on the blog post.

25 Mar 2017 9:15pm GMT

21 Mar 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Jason A. Donenfeld: WireGuard in Google Summer of Code

WireGuard is participating in Google Summer of Code 2017. If you're a student who would like to be funded this summer for writing interesting kernel code, studying cryptography, building networks, or working on a wide variety of interesting problems, then this might be appealing. The program opened to students on March 20th. If you're applying for WireGuard, choose "Linux Foundation" and state in your proposal that you'd like to work on WireGuard with "Jason Donenfeld" as your mentor.

21 Mar 2017 6:52pm GMT

17 Mar 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Michał Górny: Why you can’t rely on repository format (PMS)

You should know already that you are not supposed to rely on Portage internals in ebuilds - all variables, functions and helpers that are not defined by the PMS. You probably know that you are not supposed to touch various configuration files, vdb and other Portage files as well. What most people don't seem to understand, you are not supposed to make any assumptions about the ebuild repository either. In this post, I will expand on this and try to explain why.

What PMS specifies, what you can rely on

I think the first confusing point is that PMS actually defines the repository format pretty thoroughly. However, it does not specify that you can rely on that format being visible from within ebuild environment. It just defines a few interfaces that you can reliably use, some of them in fact quite consistent with the repository layout.

You should really look as the PMS-defined repository format as an input specification. This is the format that the developers are supposed to use when writing ebuilds, and that all basic tools are supposed to support. However, it does not prevent the package managers from defining and using other package formats, as long as they provide the environment compliant with the PMS.

In fact, this is how binary packages are implemented in Gentoo. The PMS does not define any specific format for them. It only defines a few basic rules and facilities, and both Portage and Paludis implement their own binary package formats. The package managers expose APIs required by the PMS, and can use them to run the necessary pkg_* phases.

However, the problem is not limited to two currently used binary package formats. This is a generic goal of being able to define any new package format in the future, and make it work out of the box with existing ebuilds. Imagine just a few possibilities: more compact repository formats (i.e. not requiring hundreds of unpacked files), fetching only needed ebuild files…

Sadly, none of this can even start being implemented if developers continuosly insist to rely on specific repository layout.

The *DIR variables

Let's get into the details and iterate over the few relevant variables here.

First of all, FILESDIR. This is the directory where ebuild support files are provided throughout src_* phases. However, there is no guarantee that this will be exactly the directory you created in the ebuild repository. The package manager just needs to provide the files in some directory, and this directory may not actually exist before the first src_* phase. This implies that the support files may not even exist at all when installing from a binary package, and may be created (copied, unpacked) later when doing a source build.

The next variable listed by the PMS is DISTDIR. While this variable is somewhat similar to the previous one, some developers are actually eager to make the opposite assumption. Once again, the package manager may provide the path to any directory that contains the downloaded files. This may be a 'shadow' directory containing only files for this package, or it can be any system downloads directory containing lots of other files. Once again, you can't assume that DISTDIR will exist before src_*, and that it will exist at all (and contain necessary files) when the build is performed using a binary package.

The two remaining variables I would like to discuss are PORTDIR and ECLASSDIR. Those two are a cause of real mayhem: they are completely unsuited for a multi-repository layout modern package managers use and they enforce a particular source repository layout (they are not available outside src_* phases). They pretty much block any effort on improvement, and sadly their removal is continuously blocked by a few short-sighted developers. Nevertheless, work on removing them is in progress.

Environment saving

While we're discussing those matters, a short note on environment saving is worth being written. By environment saving we usually mean the magic that causes the variables set in one phase function to be carried to a phase function following it, possibly over a disjoint sequence of actions (i.e. install followed by uninstall).

A common misunderstanding is to assume the Portage model of environment saving - i.e. basically dumping a whole ebuild environment including functions into a file. However, this is not sanctioned by the PMS. The rules require the package manager to save only variables, and only those that are not defined in global scope. If phase functions define functions, there is no guarantee that those functions will be preserved or restored. If phases redefine global variables, there is no guarantee that the redefinition will be preserved.

In fact, the specific wording used in the PMS allows a completely different implementation to be used. The package manager may just snapshot defined functions after processing the global scope, or even not snapshot them at all and instead re-read the ebuild (and re-inherit eclasses) every time the execution continues. In this case, any functions defined during phase function are lost.

Is there a future in this?

I hope this clears up all the misunderstandings on how to write ebuilds so that they will work reliably, both for source and binary builds. If those rules are followed, our users can finally start expecting some fun features to come. However, before that happens we need to fix the few existing violations - and for that to happen, we need a few developers to stop thinking only of their own convenience.

17 Mar 2017 2:58pm GMT

Marek Szuba: Gentoo Linux in a Docker container

I have been using Docker for ebuild development for quite a while and absolutely love it, mostly because how easy it is to manipulate filesystem state with it. Work on several separate ebuilds in parallel? Just spin up several containers. Clean up once I'm done? Happens automatically when I close the container. Come back to something later? One docker commit invocation and I'm done. I could of course do something similar with virtual machines (and indeed I have to for cross-platform work) - but for native amd64 is is extremely convenient.

There is, however, one catch. By default processes running in a Docker container are fairly restricted privilege-wise and the Gentoo sandbox uses ptrace(). Result? By default, certain ebuilds (sys-libs/glibc and dev-libs/gobject-introspection , to name just two) will fail to emerge. One can of course set FEATURES="-sandbox -usersandbox" for such ebuilds but it is an absolute no-no for both new ebuilds and any stabilisation work.

In the past working around this issue required messing with Docker security policies, which at least I found rather awkward. Fortunately since version 1.13.0 there has been a considerably easier way - simply pass

--cap-add=SYS_PTRACE

to docker-run. Done! Sandbox can now use ptrace() to its heart's content.

Big Fat Warning: The reason why by default Docker restricts CAP_SYS_PTRACE is that a malicious program can use ptrace() to break out of the container it runs in. Do not grant this capability to containers unless you know what you are doing. Seriously.

Unfortunately the above is not the end of the story because at least as of version 1.13.0, Docker does not allow to enhance the capabilities of a docker-build job. Why is this a problem? For my own work I use a custom image which extends somewhat the official gentoo/stage3-amd64-hardened . One of the things my Dockerfile does is rsync the Portage tree and update @world so that my image contains a fully up-to-date stage3 even when the official base image does not. You can guess what happens when Docker tries to emerge an ebuild requiring the sandbox to use ptrace()… and remember, one of the packages containing such ebuilds is sys-libs/glibc . To my current knowledge the only way around this is to spin up a ptrace-enabled container using the latest good intermediate image left behind by docker-build and execute the remaining build steps manually. Not fun… Hope they will fix this some day.

17 Mar 2017 2:31pm GMT

Marek Szuba: Changing the passphrase for SSH keys in gpg-agent

Possibly the simplest way of changing the passhprase protecting a SSH key imported into gpg-agent is to use the Assuan passwd command:

echo passwd foo | gpg-connect-agent

where foo is the keygrip of your SSH key, which one can obtain from the file $GNUPGHOME/sshcontrol [1]. So far so good - but how does one know which of the keys listed in that file is the right one, especially if your sshcontrol list is fairly long? Here are the options I am aware of at this point:

Use the key comment. If you remember the contents of the comment field of the SSH key in question you can simply grep for it in all the files stored in $GNUPGHOME/private-keys-v1.d/ . Take the name of the file that matches, strip .key from the end and you're set! Note that these are binary files so make sure your grep variant does not skip over them.

Use the MD5 fingerprint and the key comment. If for some reason you would rather not do the above you can take advantage of the fact that for SSH keys imported into gpg-agent the normal way, each keygrip line in sshcontrol is preceded by comment lines containing, among other things, the MD5 fingerprint of the imported key. Just tell ssh-add to print MD5 fingerprints for keys known to the agent instead of the default SHA256 ones:

ssh-add -E md5 -l

locate the fingerprint corresponding to the relevant key comment, then find the corresponding keygrip in sshcontrol .

Use the MD5 fingerprint and the public key. A slightly more complex variant of the above can be used if your SSH key pair in question has no comment but you still have the public key lying around. Start by running

ssh-add -L

and note the number of the line in which the public key in question shows up. The output of ssh-add -L and ssh-add -l is in the same order so you should have no trouble locating the corresponding MD5 fingerprint.

Bottom line: use meaningful comments for your SSH keys. It can really simplify key management in the long run.

[1] https://lists.gnupg.org/pipermail/gnupg-users/2007-July/031482.html

17 Mar 2017 1:21pm GMT

08 Mar 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Marek Szuba: Hello world!

Welcome to Gentoo Blogs. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

08 Mar 2017 2:12am GMT

06 Mar 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Sven Vermeulen: Handling certificates in Gentoo Linux

I recently created a new article on the Gentoo Wiki titled Certificates which talks about how to handle certificate stores on Gentoo Linux. The write-up of the article (which might still change name later, because it does not handle everything about certificates, mostly how to handle certificate stores) was inspired by the observation that I had to adjust the certificate stores of both Chromium and Firefox separately, even though they both use NSS.

06 Mar 2017 9:20pm GMT

28 Feb 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Denis Dupeyron: Gentoo is accepted to GSoC 2017

There was good news in my mailbox today. The Gentoo Foundation was accepted to be a mentor organization for Google Summer of Code 2017!

What this means is we need you as a mentor, backup mentor or expert mentor. Whether you are a Gentoo developer and have done GSoC before does not matter at this point.

A mentor is somebody who will help during the selection of students, and will mentor a student during the summer. This should take at most one hour of your time on weekdays when student actually work on their project. What's in it for you, you ask? A pretty exclusive Google T-shirt, a minion who does things you wouldn't have the time or energy to do, but most importantly gratification and a lot of fun.

Backup mentors are for when the primary mentor of a student becomes unavailable for an extended period, typically for medical or family reasons. It rarely happens but it does happen. But a backup mentor can also be an experienced mentor (i.e., have done it at least once) who assists a primary mentor who is doing it for the first time.

Expert mentors have a very specific knowledge and are contacted on an as-needed basis to help with technical decisions.

You can be any combination of all that. However, our immediate need in the coming weeks is for people (again, not necessarily mentors or devs) who will help us evaluate student proposals.

If you're a student, it's the right time now to start thinking about what project idea you would want to work on during the summer. You can find ideas on our dedicated page, or you can come up with yours (these are the best!). One note though: you are going to be working on this full-time (i.e., 8 hours a day, we don't allow for another even part-time job next to GSoC, although we do accommodate students who have a limited amount of classes or exams) for 3 months, so make sure your idea can keep you busy for this long. Whether you pick one of our ideas or come up with yours, it is strongly recommended to start discussing it with us on IRC.

As usual, we'd love to chat with you or answer your questions in #gentoo-soc on Freenode IRC. Make sure you stay long enough in the channel and give us enough time to respond to you. We are all volunteers and can't maintain a 24/7 presence. It can take up to a few hours for one of us to see your request.

28 Feb 2017 12:07am GMT

18 Feb 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Sebastian Pipping: Creating Fedora chroots on Debian, Gentoo, … easily

Hi!

Just a quick tip on how to easily create a Fedora chroot environment from (even a non-Fedora) Linux distribution.

I am going to show the process on Debian stretch but it's not be much different elsewhere.

Since I am going to leverage pip/PyPI, I need it available - that and a few non-Python widespread dependencies:

# apt install python-pip db-util lsb-release rpm yum
# pip install image-bootstrap pychroot

Now for the actual chroot creation, process and usage is very close to debootstrap of Debian:

# directory-bootstrap fedora --release 25 /var/lib/fedora_25_chroot

Done. Now let's prove we have actual Fedora 25 in there. For lsb_release we need package redhat-lsb here, but the chroot was is functional before that already.

# pychroot /var/lib/fedora_25_chroot dnf -y install redhat-lsb
# pychroot /var/lib/fedora_25_chroot lsb_release -a
LSB Version:    :core-4.1-amd64:core-4.1-noarch:[..]:printing-4.1-noarch
Distributor ID: Fedora
Description:    Fedora release 25 (Twenty Five)
Release:        25
Codename:       TwentyFive

Note the use of pychroot which does bind mounts of /dev and friends out of the box, mainly.

directory-bootstrap is part of image-bootstrap and, besides Fedora, also supports creation of chroots for Arch Linux and Gentoo.

See you 🙂

18 Feb 2017 10:20pm GMT

09 Feb 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Andreas K. Hüttel: Gentoo LiveDVD "Crispy Belgian Waffle", FOSDEM 2017 edition

So, FOSDEM 2017 is over, and as every year it was both fun and interesting. There will for sure be more blog posts, e.g., with photographs from talks by our developers, the booth, the annual Gentoo dinner, or (obviously) the beer event. The Gentoo booth, centrally located just opposite to KDE and Gnome and directly next to CoreOS, was quite popular; it's always great to hear from all the enthusiastic Gentoo fans. Many visitors also prepared, compiled, and installed their own Gentoo buttons at our button machine.
In addition we had a new Gentoo LiveDVD as handout - the "Crispy Belgian Waffle" FOSDEM 2017 edition. For those of you who couldn't make it to Brussels, you can still get it! Download the ISO here and burn it on a DVD or copy it on a USB stick - all done. Many thanks to Fernando Reyes (likewhoa) for all his work!

Finally, for those who are wondering, the "Gentoo Ecosystem" poster from our table can be downloaded as PDF here. It is based on work by Daniel Robbins and mitzip from Funtoo; the source files are available on Github. Of course this poster is continous work in progress, so tell me if you find something missing!

09 Feb 2017 9:22pm GMT

Matthew Thode: Gentoo at Fosdem

At the stand

It was nice to meet everyone and hang out as well. There was an interview with Hacker Public Radio which you can find HERE as well.

Just a short one this time, but it was nice to meet everyone.

09 Feb 2017 6:00am GMT

07 Feb 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Sven Vermeulen: I missed FOSDEM

I sadly had to miss out on the FOSDEM event. The entire weekend was filled with me being apathetic, feverish and overall zombie-like. Yes, sickness can be cruel. It wasn't until today that I had the energy back to fire up my laptop.

Sorry for the crew that I promised to meet at FOSDEM. I'll make it up, somehow.

07 Feb 2017 4:06pm GMT

06 Feb 2017

feedPlanet Gentoo

Bernard Cafarelli: app-text/tesseract 4.0 alpha ebuild available for testing

Tesseract is one of the best open-source OCR software available, and I recently took over ebuilds maintainership for it. Current development is still quite active, and since last stable release they added a new OCR engine based on LSTM neural networks. This engine is available in an alpha release, and initial numbers show a much faster OCR pass, with fewer errors.

Sounds interesting? If you want to try it, this alpha release is now in tree (along with a live ebuild). I insist on the alpha tag, this is for testing, not for production; so the ebuild masked by default, and you will have to add to your package.unmask file:
=app-text/tesseract-4.00.00_alpha*
The ebuild also includes some additional changes, like current documentation generated with USE=doc (available in stable release too), and updated linguas.

Testing with paperwork

The initial reason I took over tesseract is that I also maintain paperwork ebuilds, a personal document manager, to handle scanned documents and PDFs (which is heavy tesseract user). It recently got a new 1.1 release, if you want to give it a try!

06 Feb 2017 1:15pm GMT

Denis Dupeyron: Google Summer of Code 2017 is starting!

(A previous version of this post recommended #gentoo-soc-mentors on Freenode as the preferred discussion channel for GSoC, please use #gentoo-soc instead as the former is invite-only or ask us to invite you to it)

It's time to send us your GSoC ideas whether you can/want to mentor or not. We need as many good ideas as possible to make sure Google will select us as an organization again this year. Experience has shown us that we're not automatically selected. You can submit them yourself on the wiki or let us do it. Don't waste any time because some polishing typically needs to occur before the deadline (February 27th). You can discuss your ideas with us on Freenode in #gentoo-soc (preferred), or by email at soc-mentors@gentoo.org.

If you're potentially interested in being a mentor, only want to help during the early phases of discussing and reviewing projects, or are just curious and want to see what goes on there, please let us know and we'll add you to the mail alias. Everybody from last year was removed so don't assume you'll be on the alias because you were last year. Note that you do not have to be a Gentoo developer to be a mentor or help us with GSoC in any way.

Finally, if you're a student it's not quite time yet to ask us about projects. Please be patient, we'll let you know.

Now go and submit that idea!

06 Feb 2017 1:53am GMT